Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Jstern35

The Bread Topic (2009 – 2014)

Recommended Posts

image.jpg

European-style hearth bread. No idea why it is called that!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

European-style hearth bread. No idea why it is called that!

Originally made by sitting the dough beside the fire? Looks good, Anna.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

European-style hearth bread. No idea why it is called that!

Originally made by sitting the dough beside the fire? Looks good, Anna.

Thank you. I don't mean to brag but this was the BEST bread I have ever made (for its stye). It's wonderfully light with a crisp but not tough crust. Four tasters were ecstatic over it and I didn't use any fancy flour as called for in the original recipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I currently only make "Home Made (Machine) Bread"

1/3d white whole wheat. 2/3 all purpose white ( KA ) this :

BMBread.jpg

its 7 " x 5 " x 6 " high.

not so pretty to look at. it makes great toast if you cut the crust off, which gets pretty hard in the

toaster oven. thick cut like this:

Breakfast 2.jpg

it has good texture ( not the crust ) takes all of 3 min. to the 'start' button and is better than anything I

can buy.

hope to move to some focaccia this fall once my oven gets repaired:

amazon part: 14 $$ repairman to put it in: 150 $ +

will start with

Franci's

delicious looking focaccia from a few months ago.


Edited by rotuts (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently I woke up my starter from a deep deep slumber. I started working again on my baguettes, as well as made a simple boule.

Baguettes.jpg

Proofing.jpg

Boule.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Double batch of the Ideas In Food Olive Bread. Decided not to go with the optional suggestion of using half whole wheat flour. I used all white flour and replaced ~1/2 cup of that with potato flour. Dough rising nicely. Back later with the results...

olivedough.JPG




  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One last shot and I'll give it a rest. Haven't made bread just for the fun of it in a long time.

olivebread2.JPG



  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One last shot and I'll give it a rest. Haven't made bread just for the fun of it in a long time.

.....

It looks fabulous!
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One last shot and I'll give it a rest. Haven't made bread just for the fun of it in a long time.

.....

It looks fabulous!

It's tasty. I had softened butter and coarse salt at the ready when I cut the bread and decided it was just fine without them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember this hunt for celery bread as served at the Erie Beach Hotel?

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145272-making-memories-in-manitoulin-at-it-again/?p=1926517

image.jpg

Voila!

Kerry had a student yesterday who came via Port Dover and stopped at the market to grab 4 pieces of this famous stuff. This morning I tossed it into a dry cast iron pan, browned it in all four sides and we each enjoyed a piece while dissecting it. It is a plain, fluffy, white bread (think Wonderbread), crust sliced off and bread cut into large doorsteps. It is then brushed with melted butter (we think) mixed with celery seed. The photo was taken by my daughter who excitedly ran home with the last two, browned them and then tormented me with the photo.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Minas6907, Wow, beautiful baguettes.

Tri2Cook, I agree with Anna. Love olive bread.

I started a 12 cup batch of bread dough on Monday, with the addition of a biga.

Baguettes%20November%2011th%2C%202013%20

Baked three baguettes on Monday, and used another 1/3 of the dough today

Baguettes%20and%20Pain%20d%27epi%20Novem

for two more baguettes and a black olive pain d' epi.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After a little over 8 years, my levain is still holding up great!! I was bored yesterday and my kids wanted to make something with me. So we decided cranberry/walnut sourdough. Although as a common mistake what I do at home, I forgot to lower the oven temperature midway through. The kids love it regardless.

IMG_1052.JPG

IMG_1053.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Shiitake flat bread from Bon Appetit/Wired. Uses 1/4 cup of powdered shiitake mushrooms. Touted as a huge umami blast but failed to deliver in my opinion. Makes an interesting base for a faux pizza.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cornetti with some prepared with almond paste. The recipe is from Carol Fields The Italian Baker and has become a Christmas tradition.

P1020437(1).JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, I like your Christmas tradition. It has been awhile since I baked croissants.

Baked bread yesterday using the "Flour Water Salt Yeast - The Saturday White Bread" recipe.

The recipe makes two large round loaves.

The%20Saturday%20White%20Bread%20January

Sliced%20January%206th%2C%202014-XL.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, I like your Christmas tradition. It has been awhile since I baked croissants.

Baked bread yesterday using the "Flour Water Salt Yeast - The Saturday White Bread" recipe.

The recipe makes two large round loaves.

The%20Saturday%20White%20Bread%20January

Sliced%20January%206th%2C%202014-XL.jpg

Wow, Ann_T. That's bread to die for! I am jealous as hell.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Anna. I was really happy with the way this bread turned out.

Oh, and it makes great toast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The same bread dough makes a great pizza crust.

Pizza%20Sausage%20and%20Olive%20January%

Pizza%20Sausage%20and%20Olive%20January%

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann_T great looking bread and pizza. I've started making bread after a lay off of many years. A nice loaf cost about $6-$7 so I thought I'll make bread and upgrade my beer. This loaf is Pan Bigio from Carol Fields book made with a starter and 2:1 ratio of bread flour to whole wheat. It makes great toast.

Anna_N beautiful ciabatta. I'll try that later in the week or the coccodrillo variation posted by Jon.

P1020479(1).JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, those loaves look great! I have dough rising for Ken Forkish' Saturday Bread. Hope the finished loaf is worthy of posting here.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By trfl
      Dear fellow bakers,
      We have been baking no-knead bread at home for several years and as a family of scientists and engineers, we consistently tried to make it even more easier and convenient. 
      We liked what we ended up with so much that, I decided to start a small company (based in Eindhoven, Netherlands) to make a new bread kit product out of it.
       
      I am seeking your help to know your opinion of the product and how the story is told.
       
      LoafNest is an improvement on no-knead Dutch oven bread making. We took perforated silicone liner designed for professional bread baking and put it into a uniquely designed cast iron casserole. With this improvement, there is no need for shaping or second raising of the bread. You just mix, let the dough raise, pre-heat, pour the dough, bake and done!
       
      So, LoafNest is a no-knead, no-mess, no-cleanup solution for convenient and practical bread making.
       
      The perforated silicone liner is from the same company that makes Silpat mats. Our liner is a more advanced version with perforations that allow radiative, conductive and convective heat to all sides of the bread. It is also rated to a higher temperature (260C/500F)
       
      With less than 5 minutes of active work that can fit into a busy schedule, we hope to reduce the entry barrier for people who are willing to make bread. Our primary targets are people who buy expensive premium bread but want to make their own premium bread at home or people who use bread machines and want to eat better bread.
       
      While it is not a primary target, we also believe this is a nice solution for experienced bakers who want to use a high-humidity, high thermal mass baking environment.
       
      You can find the details and more images on http://trfl.nl/LoafNest  [still a little bit work in progress] and http://trfl.nl/loafnest-gallery 
      What are your impressions of the product? Visually and functionally? What are your thoughts on how the story is told? Any improvement to resonate better with people who are thinking of starting to bake their own bread? Any thoughts on pricing? I would be grateful to your feedback and suggestions.
       
      I am sure, in the end, we all want more people to eat better and healthier bread. So please support me in this endeavor. 
       


    • By Chris Hennes
      Of the many zillions of inclusions they discuss in Modernist Bread, one that I'd honestly never considered was sprouted grains. Apparently I'm out of touch with the "health food" movement! Have any of you made bread with sprouted grains? Can you describe the flavor difference between sprouted versus just soaked? Right now I'm sprouting some rye, but I'm curious about what to expect from the finished product.
    • By KennethT
      Is there a discussion in the book about the purpose of adding ascorbic acid?  I just saw the contest #2 in which the recipe called for it.  I'm curious because a woman I know on the internet used to work in a bakery in Vietnam, and said that to get similar results to the banh mi there, you need to add ascorbic acid.  Does it act as a gluten relaxer?  Traditional banh mi have a very tender and crisp crust, and a very light and tender, relatively closed crumb.
    • By Kasia
      A SANDWICH TO GO
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a snack which you can grab and eat "on the go". I know that it is unhealthy. We should celebrate eating and eat calmly and with deliberation. However, sometimes the day is too short for everything on our schedule and we still have to eat. Admittedly, we can sin and go for some fast food, but it is healthier and tastier to prepare something quickly in our own kitchen.

      Today, Camembert cheese and cranberries in a fresh, crunchy roll take the lead role. It sounds easy and yummy, doesn't it? Try it and get on with your day . Today I used a homemade cranberry preserve which was left over from dessert, but if you like you can buy your own.

      Ingredients:
      2 fresh rolls (your favourite ones)
      150g of camembert cheese
      1 handful of lettuce
      2 teaspoons of butter
      2 teaspoons of pine nuts or sunflower seeds
      preserve
      100g of fresh cranberries
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      100ml of apple juice

      Wash the cranberries. Put the cranberries, sugar and apple juice into a pan with a heavy bottom and boil with the lid on for 10-12 minutes, stirring from time to time. Try it and if necessary add some sugar. Leave to cool down. Cut the rolls in half and spread with the butter. Put some lettuce on one half of the roll. Slice the camembert cheese and arrange it on the lettuce. Put a fair portion of the cranberry preserve on top of the cheese. Sprinkle with the roast pine nuts or sunflower seeds and cover with the second half of the roll.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Dave the Cook
      Modernist Bread is out now, but maybe you haven't taken the plunge. Here's your chance to win your own copy, courtesy of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Cooking Lab has provided us with a couple of other prizes that will go to a second and third winner: second place will win an autographed poster and calendar, and third place will receive an autographed poster. They are also providing an autographed bookplate for the first place winner's copy of Modernist Bread. The rules are simple: we are going to post recipes from the book that the team at The Cooking Lab has graciously provided for this purpose. To enter into the contest, you need to bake one or more of these recipes and post about them in the official contest topics by the end of November 2017. Winners will be drawn at random from those posting pictures and descriptions of their completed loaves. Complete rules and other details can be found here.
       
      For part two, we're featuring another cornerstone recipe from the book: Direct Country-Style Bread. The only leavener here is instant yeast, so production time is considerably shortened. The relative lack of flavor compared to long-proofed doughs is offset by the use of whole grains. Courtesy of The Cooking Lab, here's that recipe (extracted from the book and reformatted for purposes of this contest):
       




  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×