Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Robot Coupe Blixer for ganache


Chocolot
 Share

Recommended Posts

I use a Robot Coupe R2, but a supplier has suggested a Blixer. I like the R2 just fine and have good success with it. Just wondering if any of you have experience with the Blixer. It is about twice as much money as the R2.

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I worked in a kitchen equipped with a Blixer for about 6 years. It's a large, heavy, and powerful machine. I think the advantages of the Blixer over the R2 include the large (7qt?) stainless steel bowl, the additional processing attachments, and the amount of power. If the R2 works for you, and you don't need the additional capacity and attachments, than the Blixer might be overkill. Hope this helps!

Adam

I use a Robot Coupe R2, but a supplier has suggested a Blixer.  I like the R2 just fine and have good success with it.  Just wondering if any of you have experience with the Blixer.  It is about twice as much money as the R2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I have read about other chocolatiers doing their ganache with the robot coupe, also I found it as a topic in one of the Chocolate Academy class

http://www.bcna-chocolateacademy.com/expert they talk about a vacuum robot coupe tecnique, I was wondering if anyone does this ( not that I am thinking of doing it, the prices for these babies are crazy!) like this one? http://www.shopping.com/xPO-R8

Vanessa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got back from Wybauw's course in Chicago - he recommends the blixer over the R2 because of it's capability to do other things. The R2 is just not strong enough for a lot of applications. He made an almond gianduja in the blixer - the R2 couldn't handle it...

That being said, he has a new favourite machine - the Thermomix. http://www.thermomixcanada.ca/en/

It's not available in the US yet but it is available in Canada and can be shipped to the US. He loves it. The only problem is that it has a small capacity - I think only 2 litres. He said this is made as a home machine but almost every professional in Europe has one.

When I was in Italy, Paul DeBondt showed us his - he loves it too. In Italy they called it a Bimby.

I'd love to hear about anyone's experience with this machine - especially for making ganache.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahh the famous bimby, I have several italian friends that use it, I know they make everything with it, I should ask about ganaches and report back.

Anyway the prices for the blixers and co are improbable for a small production, at least for me.

Vanessa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it seems so unnecessary doesn't it? How hard is it to make ganache properly? Why do you need a food processor? I personally do not think it makes the ganache any better what-so-ever, so why waste your money, even on the electricity to use it? why?

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got back from Wybauw's course in Chicago - he recommends the blixer over the R2 because of it's capability to do other things.  The R2 is just not strong enough for a lot of applications.  He made an almond gianduja in the blixer - the R2 couldn't handle it...

That being said, he has a new favourite machine - the Thermomix.  http://www.thermomixcanada.ca/en/

It's not available in the US yet but it is available in Canada and can be shipped to the US.  He loves it.  The only problem is that it has a small capacity - I think only 2 litres.  He said this is made as a home machine but almost every professional in Europe has one. 

When I was in Italy, Paul DeBondt showed us his - he loves it too.  In Italy they called it a Bimby.

I'd love to hear about anyone's experience with this machine - especially for making ganache.

Did Wybauw make any ganaches in the machine? What technique is he using?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm intrigued, how do you make your ganaches Chiantiglace? And when you say the machine-made aren't any better, are you referring to texture and shelflife?

With a spatula, a pot, and a bow. Also, preferably with a big piece of marble as well.

If the ganache is emulsified properly, then how can a machine increase its shelf life. I can understand that people think the ganache may be smoother with a machine, but I have seen no difference, in fact I have tasted a few machine made ganaches that tasted kind of spongy and or flaky, I did not care for that at all.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally, I like using hand-held immersion blenders because I work with really small quantities. Some MOF chocolatiers don't like them though as to get a homogenous emulsion with an immersion blender you have to lift the mixing head up and down: thus 'breaking' the emulsion. I think this is discussed a bit in Kestener's class at the French Pastry School. 'Blenders' like the robotcoupe etc circulate the ganache on it's own in a continuous movement and supposedly makes for a more thorough emulsion.

There are videos with Wybauw demonstrating the thermomix on the Callebaut website.

At the Bajard school I hear they use a thermomix in class combined with the 'hot chocolate' technique explained in Ramon Morato's book (pouring heating chocolate into cold cream) for a really good result. Besides the convenience factor with weighing/heating/mixing in the same unit, the only observable benefit is the high rotation speed of the blades: roughly 10,000 per minute whereas my robotcoupe only goes to 3,000. I'd love to know if there are any unique features to this machine that contribute to a superior ganache though as I've gotten in contact with thermomix and am getting them to do a demonstration but I think they can only tell me the capabilities of the machine and it's up to me to figure out why it's good for ganache.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a fair enough point Chiantiglace. After all, what you sense when you eat the product is the most important thing after all.

I'm speculating here but I think the thought is that there are degrees of emulsions. The finer the water particles in the fat or vice versa, the better the emulsion and the better the shelf life. Also that machines, when used properly, do not incorporate air. Without getting a microscope and actually analysing though, I'm just relying on hearsay.

You mentioned a marble to make your ganaches, do you table them then?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are videos with Wybauw demonstrating the thermomix on the Callebaut website.

Please let us know how your demo goes! I think you're probably right - they'll tell you it's capabilities and you'll have to figure out if it's good for ganache.

Like I said before, it only has a 2 litre container. My ganache slabs require more capacity than that so it's not even an option for me.

I looked on the Callebaut website and couldn't find a video with Wybauw demonstrating the thermomix... can you provide a link if it's not too much trouble?

Kerry, Wybauw made his ganache using a whisk (boiled cream over callets). He said not to use a rubber spatula as it must be emulsified. He was not at all adverse to using tempered chocolate and the cream at 35 C. As well, he encouraged us to try the robot coupe. He didn't really care which method was used to make the ganache. What he did stress was that it had to be crystallized. I think Mark Rose already talked about that in another thread.

chiantiglace, I'm looking at the Robot Coupe to make ganache because it is so darn easy and makes a great emulsion which = better shelf life. But back to easy -right now I use tempered chocolate and an immersion blender to make ganache . Works OK but my quantities are bigger than when I first started and this method can incorporate air easily if not done perfectly. I also like the emulsion that can be achieved with the robot coupe. And I really couldn't believe how FAST it happens! I'd also like to use callets to make my ganache - also easier than having to temper the chocolate each time I make ganache. Without the robot coupe I don't get complete melting of the callets so have to fuss. Again I reiterate - so easy with the Robot Coupe!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally, I like using hand-held immersion blenders because I work with really small quantities. Some MOF chocolatiers don't like them though as to get a homogenous emulsion with an immersion blender you have to lift the mixing head up and down: thus 'breaking' the emulsion. I think this is discussed a bit in Kestener's class at the French Pastry School. 'Blenders' like the robotcoupe etc circulate the ganache on it's own in a continuous movement and supposedly makes for a more thorough emulsion.

There are videos with Wybauw demonstrating the thermomix on the Callebaut website.

At the Bajard school I hear they use a thermomix in class combined with the 'hot chocolate' technique explained in Ramon Morato's book (pouring heating chocolate into cold cream) for a really good result. Besides the convenience factor with weighing/heating/mixing in the same unit, the only observable benefit is the high rotation speed of the blades: roughly 10,000 per minute whereas my robotcoupe only goes to 3,000. I'd love to know if there are any unique features to this machine that contribute to a superior ganache though as I've gotten in contact with thermomix and am getting them to do a demonstration but I think they can only tell me the capabilities of the machine and it's up to me to figure out why it's good for ganache.

Do you have a link to the videos with Wybauw demonstrating the thermonix? I haven't found it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

did anyone understand how the chocoalte got tempered? He put it at 50C and 4 minutes and then the lady claimed it was tempered. Did I miss out on something?

She did say that there were still some unmelted bits to provide seed crystals, so maybe it doesn't heat all that fast and 4 minutes was only enough to melt most of the chocolate but not all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

did anyone understand how the chocoalte got tempered? He put it at 50C and 4 minutes and then the lady claimed it was tempered. Did I miss out on something?

She did say that there were still some unmelted bits to provide seed crystals, so maybe it doesn't heat all that fast and 4 minutes was only enough to melt most of the chocolate but not all.

I don't get it either. Even if there are unmelted bits to provide seed crystals, wouldn't you have to do some sort of cooling with agitation to temper the chocolate. My impression from the video was that at the end of the 4 minutes the chocolate was tempered. Maybe I missed something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

did anyone understand how the chocoalte got tempered? He put it at 50C and 4 minutes and then the lady claimed it was tempered. Did I miss out on something?

She did say that there were still some unmelted bits to provide seed crystals, so maybe it doesn't heat all that fast and 4 minutes was only enough to melt most of the chocolate but not all.

I don't get it either. Even if there are unmelted bits to provide seed crystals, wouldn't you have to do some sort of cooling with agitation to temper the chocolate. My impression from the video was that at the end of the 4 minutes the chocolate was tempered. Maybe I missed something.

Yes, they did seem to suggest that the chocolate was tempered and ready to be used, not just melted and ready to be tempered. On the other hand, maybe it is more of an infomercial and they are not to be believed, although I would expect more from Callebaut and such chefs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...