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Mousse


Tri2Cook
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If I wanted to formulate a mousse base mainly for encasing and filling cakes that will have a firmer texture than traditional mousse (yeah, gelatin... I know) that has increased stability once out of the cooler (for situations where the cake may have to sit out for a bit) with reduced risk of syneresis due to the freeze/thaw cycle during production (the last two being the reasons the obvious, gelatin, isn't the perfect solution) but still maintains good mouthfeel, what would be a good hydrocolloid/stabilizer/etc. to look into?

I've ordered a sample of Stabilizer CT-D100 (a blend of carrageenan and tara gum) from GumTech because it sounds like it might be perfect for the job but I'm always on the lookout for backup plans and interesting solutions to problems (and I don't have a good track record of getting responses from U.S. based companies despite being an industry customer).

I don't need this for my normal day-to-day work but I get the occasional situation where I need the qualities stated above. I had a glazed mousse-encased cake slip part of the glaze due to syneresis in the mousse underneath with a cake that had to spend some time at room temp, fortunately not for a paying customer but I was still very unhappy about it.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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If I wanted to formulate a mousse base mainly for encasing and filling cakes that will have a firmer texture than traditional mousse (yeah, gelatin... I know) that has increased stability once out of the cooler (for situations where the cake may have to sit out for a bit) with reduced risk of syneresis due to the freeze/thaw cycle during production (the last two being the reasons the obvious, gelatin, isn't the perfect solution) but still maintains good mouthfeel, what would be a good hydrocolloid/stabilizer/etc. to look into?

I've ordered a sample of Stabilizer CT-D100 (a blend of carrageenan and tara gum) from GumTech because it sounds like it might be perfect for the job but I'm always on the lookout for backup plans and interesting solutions to problems (and I don't have a good track record of getting responses from U.S. based companies despite being an industry customer).

I don't need this for my normal day-to-day work but I get the occasional situation where I need the qualities stated above. I had a glazed mousse-encased cake slip part of the glaze due to syneresis in the mousse underneath with a cake that had to spend some time at room temp, fortunately not for a paying customer but I was still very unhappy about it.

A couple of questions please for the newbie folk:

from Wiki sources: Syneresis (also spelled 'synæresis' or 'synaeresis'), in chemistry, is the extraction or expulsion of a liquid from a gel, as when lymph drains from a contracting clot of blood. Another example of syneresis is the collection of whey on the surface of yogurt.

So this would mean that the liquid part of the mousse drains out and makes things slip?

Also why is gelatin not an answer to the problem? It doesn't do the job? It is also subject to syneresis?

Thanks. :smile:

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Gelatin is very prone to syneresis, especially after freezing. It holds up well enough in higher concentrations (in the 1% or higher range) to not usually be a problem unless it needs to have a longer shelf life (which is not an issue for what I do) or it needs to spend more than a short time out of it's cold environment (which is sometimes an issue for what I do and the main reason behind my question). Agar can help with temp stability but I was hoping to find some less gelatinous options.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I've read that as well. It's a bit on the expensive side to serve as a general purpose stabilizer but it may be worth looking into. It also made me wonder if simply working some cocoa butter into the formula may help.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Gelatin is very prone to syneresis, especially after freezing. It holds up well enough in higher concentrations (in the 1% or higher range) to not usually be a problem unless it needs to have a longer shelf life (which is not an issue for what I do) or it needs to spend more than a short time out of it's cold environment (which is sometimes an issue for what I do and the main reason behind my question). Agar can help with temp stability but I was hoping to find some less gelatinous options.

Thank you Tri2Cook. Learn something new every day. Learn, learn, learn...

I searched earlier for a thread on a new product which purported to do something for stability, but couldn't find it. I wrote to the manufacturer, who was giving out free samples???, and received neither sample or reply. :sad:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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If you're experimenting with interesting hydrocolloids, it might be worth playing around with the fundamental structure of the mousse. Rather than trying to stabilize a traditional mousse that's based on a fundamentally unstable foam (egg white? whipped cream?) folded into the chocolate mixture, you can dispense with all that. The chocolate base can include cream, water, or liquids to adjust the consistency, and then other ingredients to emulsify, stabilize, and adjust the final texture. After chilling it below 50 degrees, the whole thing can be whipped into an airy mouse, molded, and chillled again for several hours. the result is stable.

I've experimented with combinations of gelatin and cornstarch, and gelatin and xanthan gum. I think I'd stick with gelatin just for the melting mouthfeel that it lends. But for complimentary ingredients, there may be a lot of more effective choices than the ones i've tried.

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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I use Mycryo on a regular basis. In my shop we use it to "solidfy" the desserts sop thet unmold alittle cleaner. I like the product, yes it is pricey

"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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even the proteins in your cream and eggs are prone to syneresis.

look for products that are thixotropic, I suggest a combination of xanthan and iota carrageenan, but thats as much as ill say.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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Thanks for the information everybody, that gives me some directions to check out.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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