Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

21212 Restaurant


Recommended Posts

Lemon tart with fillet steak?? What? It could be im missing something here but what is so clever and creative about that?  Maybe its the purist in me but for fu.k sake.

What was he trying to do, clear out his fridges?

I thnk you've just solved the mystery of 'avant-garde' cooking. Its all about clearing out the fridges. Thats a truly brilliant idea. I shall not look at Heston's work quite the same ever again.

It no longer exists, but it was lovely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Damn!!!

I regularly clear the fridge about 1 in the morning whilst spluttering Oliver Reed inspired renditions of "Wild Thing". Lesser the cowboy tache, naturally, but with equally disapproving pissy-pants. So, where's MY ticket to Madrid Fusion?

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lemon tart with fillet steak?? What? It could be im missing something here but what is so clever and creative about that?  Maybe its the purist in me but for fu.k sake.

What was he trying to do, clear out his fridges?

If thats gets your juices going, then fair play to you. Im all for avant guard cooking but there comes a point in my view, when it just becomes a nonsense.

You know, I don't like the sound of Snail Porridge or Bacon and Egg Ice-Cream but I'm willing to bet that Michelin and the body of opinion is correct and when I get the chance to try them they'll be lovely.

I hate tapioca with a passion but I still tried Thomas Keller's "Oysters and Pearls" at Per Se and it was one of the most sublime experiences of my life. And I do include losing my virginity.

With this in mind, let's remember that lemon is a classic aromat with beef and then stretch our imagination just slightly to consider that the lemon tart in question isn't a bog-standard tarte citron.

So, unless you've tried, are you qualified to condemn? Personally I'm of the belief that eating out should sometimes be theatre and you should always give something a try before writing it off, I've written off The Kitchen but that's after going there!

I do agree with some of your comments Ross BUT there are times when experience of working with high quality foods on a daily basis comes into its own. There are times when you don't need to physically visit an establishment, to have a fair idea of whats going on. What works, what doesn't etc. Sounds a little daft but there will be others on here who know exactly what Im talking about.

While we are at it with name dropping, I've also been to Keller's, French Laundry. Was it the best meal of my life? no. Was it one of the best experiences? Without a doubt. You work it out :hmmm:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The lunch at £20 is a bargain, most certainly for the quality.

How does the lunch pricing work? Is £20 for two courses, with price building up to the £60 for the full 21212 shooting match?

PS

Edinburgh

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The lunch at £20 is a bargain, most certainly for the quality.

How does the lunch pricing work? Is £20 for two courses, with price building up to the £60 for the full 21212 shooting match?

I never asked the question.

It looks that way on the website, although being lunch it surely has to be quite a bit cheaper than dinner.

Anybody been for lunch yet?

A report would be appreciated :smile:

Ps Thought I might give em a call, but they close Mondays.

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do agree with some of your comments Ross BUT there are times when experience of working with high quality foods on a daily basis comes into its own. There are times when you don't need to physically visit an establishment, to have a fair idea of whats going on. What works, what doesn't etc. Sounds a little daft but there will be others on here who know exactly what Im talking about.

While we are at it with name dropping, I've also been to Keller's, French Laundry. Was it the best meal of my life? no. Was it one of the best experiences? Without a doubt. You work it out :hmmm:

I suspect we're coming at this from different places (or at least our palates are), I love haute food and will happily eat it 'till the cows come home but I do believe that there is almost a "sameness" about joints like Restaurant Martin Wishart, Restaurant Gordon Ramsay and Per Se. The flavours are all superlative and yet familiar at times and this is exactly why I'm so excited about 21212, the combinations and layers of flavour refreshed my palate and left me giddy with excitement, and I'm not a schoolgirl, I've got a beard and everything!

I mentioned TK's Oysters and Pearls at Per Se because it was the only dish in the entire meal that really excited me, though the meal was excellent as I'm sure your French Laundry experience would have been. At 21212 all the courses had that effect.

Now I know that Paul Kitching isn't the only, or even first chef to take this approach - Pierre Gagnaire springs to mind - but it's something totally new to Edinburgh and makes a great counterpoint to the established, and rather good themselves, joints like The Plumed Horse and Number 1.

It's all horses for courses I suppose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just stumbled on these wonderful photies of Pauls food.

Food porn at its best  :biggrin:

http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=21212+rest...erer_searched=1

Looks like Paul has got a great discount on Lethicin............ :laugh:

I think this is Pauls wonderful attempt at introducing healthy eating to high end dining :wink:

http://www.howtodothings.com/health-fitnes...t-from-lecithin

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My partner and I dined in 21212 just after it opened. While there was a lot we enjoyed about the evening, we would end up leaving disappointed. This seemed to be due to what were a mix of teething problems, and some more worrying signs.

I should quickly preface all this description by initially saying that my partner has specific dietary requirements due to wheat and dairy allergies. This said, we as much as anyone else appreciate how difficult this is to accommodate in a meal and gave 21212 three weeks notice about this. They said that they would be able to accommodate her.

The evening is probably best dealt with in chronological order. We arrived to a half-full room that while breathtakingly elegant, was awkwardly quiet. The service on arrival was respectful while still appearing kind and sincere. Offered a choice of seating, we asked for a shallow table by the window, looking back into the dining room and kitchen. Sitting next to each other on a couch, the arrangement was an almost impossible mix of comfort and suitability to dining. This was perhaps, the nicest seating arrangement I have encountered in a restaurant.

Saving discussion of the wine for later, I’ll start with a description of the starters, both of which were exquisite. We had the warm scallops with seven peas and the chicken BLT that have been described previously in this thread. These were brilliantly executed, challenging (to culinary norms rather than to the diner), and playful. The clarity and depth of flavour really stood out (as they would for all the dishes): which is saying a lot when you consider that we were using a benchmark set by Edinburgh’s Michelin-starred establishments.

My partner was not able to eat the soup, so they very graciously provided her with a replacement course which seemed like a variation on the chicken dish I had to start, sous vide chicken with ‘trail mix’ and foam. Both the soup and the other dish were much like the starter: bright clear and defined flavours all complimenting each other in a way that seemed to defy their description on paper.

The mention of trail-mix might seem an odd segue into discussion of the wine, but with all the nut and dried fruit flavours (the chorizo too) that feature on the menu, I was really wanting a wine list that gave more than a cursory nod to sherry. The list is comprehensive, but somewhat lacking in exciting or interesting bottles. While this might not be so noticeable in other establishments, the stark thematic contrast with the menu is a shame. This said, the pricing of the list will sit happily with the range of dinners that 21212 will be sure to host.

The mains were much like that starters, original, witty and weird. I had the turbot, chorizo, vanilla, date and swede pure and my partner had the beef fillet with citrus custard and crushed green olives. Again, I was astounded with the precision of the technique used by the kitchen and the clarity of flavour. The cheese was plentiful, well chosen and served in perfect condition.

Deserts were a joy for me and a resounding disaster for my partner. To reiterate, the kitchen had more than three weeks notice of her requirements, but on the night what they served her was a large portion of the ginger sorbet (which accompanies one of the desserts on the menu) with some dried fruit. The ginger sorbet is brilliantly firey, I’m sure that the three or so mouthfuls that accompany the dessert on the menu, it fits in perfectly. The problem was that no one in the kitchen had considered how a diner might feel about a larger portion.

For my partner, the first few mouthfuls were great, and then she started looking a bit uncomfortable. By the fifth or six spoonful, she gave up as the ginger was completely overwhelming her palate to the point where it was starting to sting. To add injury to insult, the kitchen had left one of the dates in the dessert unpitted. She sent the dessert back less that half eaten and with the date pit on the side. Given that we politely informed the waitress about the problem, I was quite puzzled as to why the kitchen did not send an apology.

The coffee was the second disaster and really needs to be addressed. To end of a meal which from a kitchen so obviously striving for culinary heights, with a sour, insipid espresso in apparently from a netspresso machine, to serve it in a disposable paper cup, and to not offer even a coffee spoon (replaced by individually wrapped and disposable swizzle sticks) was the most frustrating end to a meal I have ever had. The accompanying bon bons, I can not comment on as I felt it rude to consider eating them in front of my partner when she had not been offered any substitute.

We ended up leaving with a definite feeling of disappointed. The meal had hit some very high highs, but the depths of its lows were not worth putting-up with. In retrospect, I just wished that I had my evening (and expectations) back.

Edited by beef_and_burgundy (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And it's typical of Fatty Bath that he felt the portions were too small.

Mind you, from reading his other reviews, I'm amazed that his palate is refined enough to discern components that we all missed (us being mere amateurs of course). He'd never call Katie the next day to ask what the dishes were, surely not.

Oops, I think we've stumbled onto another of my hobby horses, local hacks who think they're critics because they expense the odd meal or two; even MPs have better judgement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oops, I think we've stumbled onto another of my hobby horses, local hacks who think they're critics because they expense the odd meal or two; even MPs have better judgement.

Couldn't agree more. I gave up on the Scotsman's restaurant reviews a long time ago, as they seem to think it appropriate to send random journos/minor "celebs" without a trace of culinary knowledge to do them.

PS

Edinburgh

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And it's typical of Fatty Bath that he felt the portions were too small

Interesting comment about the portions though, he's not the first to be disappointed with them. In retrospect, I was reasonably happy with the overall quantity, but would have liked a bit more variation ideally. The starter, main and cheese course were all more-or-less equal in size. My preference is for the main course to be the main course: or at least the peak of the meal (especially as we're talking only 5 courses here).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ross, you said before that you liked the style of Wishart's but not of Kitchin. Any chance of you expanding on this in the interests of a bit of light-hearted food geekery?

There's a full report on my issues with The Kitchin on the Kitchin thread (http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=119285) but in short, Restaurant MW has stayed true to itself and Martin's nature.

The Kitchin's cuisine however suffered from a rather more jarring change around the same time Tom first appeared on GBM (and photos of Tom appeared in the dining room as well); and so instead of the clean, pared down and refreshing plates that excited me so much when they first opened we are offered plates that owe a lot to Fergus Henderson and Fernand Point but are lacking in their finesse (intentionally I suspect). It all feels a bit contrived of late.

And the service has gone down hill too since Mrs K has been on Maternity leave; that said, I do hope it gets it's act back in gear as it's a sorely missed option from my regular haunt roster.

Edited by Ross Boyce (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link. Might head over and add my 2 pennies (from my generally positive experiences at The Kitchin). Interestingly though, I really didn’t get any sense of ‘Henderson-ness’ from the dishes there. I’ll go off and deliberate about exactly where the differences lie. As for Point, I have to admit that I know more of him and his cooking from reputation (through Leibling etc.) than from any first-hand look at his writing. It’s something I really need to look into closer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David, sounds like its love between you and the 'maestro' PK!!!!!!! :laugh:

Richard, I think a weekly visit to eat his food would be in order if we lived in Edinburgh.

I can categorically claim not to be on the payroll, or receive any special treatment, but admit to being a bit of an obsessive of late :laugh:

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David, sounds like its love between you and the 'maestro' PK!!!!!!! :laugh:

Richard, I think a weekly visit to eat his food would be in order if we lived in Edinburgh.

I can categorically claim not to be on the payroll, or receive any special treatment, but admit to being a bit of an obsessive of late :laugh:

You do right David! Its great that you enjoy your eating.

Edinburgh now seems to boast an excellent draw, when it comes to decent restaurants. Certainly wish I could visit more often. Wisharts is still the place for me. Enjoyed some grand food there, although the portions can be a wee bit on the tame side! Also, No 1 at the Balmoral is definately worth going to. Again have enjoyed it there too.

Not sure about the Plummed horse though. For saying it recieved a star, I wasn't impressed one bit. To my reckoning it was no more than the michelin looking after their own, so to speak. Would be interested in hearing others comments on this place.

So wheres next on the agenda? You certainly get about a bit!!! :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David, sounds like its love between you and the 'maestro' PK!!!!!!! :laugh:

Richard, I think a weekly visit to eat his food would be in order if we lived in Edinburgh.

I can categorically claim not to be on the payroll, or receive any special treatment, but admit to being a bit of an obsessive of late :laugh:

You do right David! Its great that you enjoy your eating.

Edinburgh now seems to boast an excellent draw, when it comes to decent restaurants. Certainly wish I could visit more often. Wisharts is still the place for me. Enjoyed some grand food there, although the portions can be a wee bit on the tame side! Also, No 1 at the Balmoral is definately worth going to. Again have enjoyed it there too.

Not sure about the Plummed horse though. For saying it recieved a star, I wasn't impressed one bit. To my reckoning it was no more than the michelin looking after their own, so to speak. Would be interested in hearing others comments on this place.

So wheres next on the agenda? You certainly get about a bit!!! :laugh:

I might just beat you to the Sportsman, I know you fancy going, all the reports are great including Andy Haylers recent visit

http://www.andyhayler.com/food_blog_view.asp?id=188

Its still a heck of a treck though, over 400 miles round trip......... still :smile:

"So many places, so little time"

http://londoncalling...blogspot.co.uk/

@d_goodfellow1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...