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The Fat Duck 2008


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I have bought the Alinea book, pretty excellent and 1/4 of the price of the FD book (although compleltely quality altogether) I don't think I will be dishing 100 quid for the FD book as I read somewhere that HB will have a cheapo version out soon

edit: just read the post above, 100 quid is the cheap version????? what the "duck"???

Out of interest, where did you get the Alinea book from? Amazon (both US and UK) have it listed for an October release date?

Lee

He means hes ordered it/payed. Amazon is a very good price, i'll be ordering it off there. opinion seems to be that the mosaic you get to see when you order from the alinea website is good but not specifically worth it for the extra money, i'd agree from what i've seen (thanks again :wink: ) though the videos are mindblowing.

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I have bought the Alinea book, pretty excellent and 1/4 of the price of the FD book (although compleltely quality altogether) I don't think I will be dishing 100 quid for the FD book as I read somewhere that HB will have a cheapo version out soon

edit: just read the post above, 100 quid is the cheap version????? what the "duck"???

Out of interest, where did you get the Alinea book from? Amazon (both US and UK) have it listed for an October release date?

Lee

pre-ordered it from amazon, 23 pounds. I would wish I had a pre-release copy...

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I have bought the Alinea book, pretty excellent and 1/4 of the price of the FD book (although compleltely quality altogether) I don't think I will be dishing 100 quid for the FD book as I read somewhere that HB will have a cheapo version out soon

edit: just read the post above, 100 quid is the cheap version????? what the "duck"???

Out of interest, where did you get the Alinea book from? Amazon (both US and UK) have it listed for an October release date?

Lee

pre-ordered it from amazon, 23 pounds. I would wish I had a pre-release copy...

i ordered a pre release copy last year and i just recieved a pasword and login name which gives acces to pics + recipes + videos and preview pages of the alinea book and its awesome stuff. i cant wait for october when it get released

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  • 3 weeks later...

Took 20 minutes to get on the waiting list for lunch, 25th or 26th of June, so that's not too bad. What's the general experience of being on the waiting list - rough odds of getting a table?

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hav ejust been onto amazon uk and the big fat duck book is on fro £75 pound pre order, alinea is £38 pre order. both look brilliant. but wonder if they will be about as much use as the elbulli book whick is really hard to work from.

any thoughts

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hav ejust been onto amazon uk and the big fat duck book is on fro £75 pound pre order, alinea is £38 pre order. both look brilliant. but wonder if they will be about as much use as the elbulli book whick is really hard to work from.

any thoughts

Well my first thought is order the alinea book on the US site amazon.com. Its listing for $31.50 (abt £16) at the moment. Even with international postage thrown in you'll be streets ahead...

J

More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!
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  • 2 months later...

I'm off to the fat duck tonight :) Been waiting to go for ages and since it was my bday yesterday i figured the timing was right!

I'll write up a report when i get the chance - i'm not sure whether to bring my camera or not though..

To say i'm looking forward to tonight is an understatement... :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
I've only bought the past couple of Good Food Guides, so I always presumed a 10 was impossible. How exicting, maybe one day I'll be able to go and experience it for myself!

Well, we're booked for the end of next week, so we should be able to see at first hand what difference the score of 10 has over the 9 it had on our last visit. It is now 2 (or 3?) years since we last went to the Fat Duck, so the menu should have evolved a bit more since then.

Looking back through the old GFG's which I haven't yet thrown out shows that a 10 is not unknown - in the 2005 guide Gordon Ramsay @ Royal Hospital Road had cooking = 10 and was the guide's UK Restaurant of the Year. What isn't clear to me is whether the cooking standard had really dropped by 2006 or if they had revised their criteria.

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