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chocomoo

Paris restaurants - sharing tables

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Hi, 4 of us will be going to Paris at the end of May. We're looking for suggestions for restaurants where we can share tables with strangers. My sister & her bf went to Chartier a couple years ago and shared a great conversation with a Jamaican guy & a Parisian guy.

Anyone know if Daniel Rose's Spring (1st arrondisement) has re-opened yet?

Thanks!

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Hi, 4 of us will be going to Paris at the end of May.  We're looking for suggestions for restaurants where we can share tables with strangers.  My sister & her bf went to Chartier a couple years ago and shared a great conversation with a Jamaican guy & a Parisian guy.

Afaria, Vieil Ami, Violin d'Ingres albeit the last is small, the counters at l'Atelier de J.R + Les Cocottes.

Anyone know if Daniel Rose's Spring (1st arrondisement) has re-opened yet?
When it does, you'll hear.
Thanks!


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Hi, 4 of us will be going to Paris at the end of May.  We're looking for suggestions for restaurants where we can share tables with strangers.  My sister & her bf went to Chartier a couple years ago and shared a great conversation with a Jamaican guy & a Parisian guy.

Anyone know if Daniel Rose's Spring (1st arrondisement) has re-opened yet?

Thanks!

Most popular restaurants, brasseries and cafes have seating that is so close and cramped that you are practically sharing a table with your neighbours anyway. It is relatively common for conversations to develop with your neighbours, however it is good to be sensitive not everyone will welcome the chat and Parisians tend to be quietly spoken and good manners are essential.

It may be a shorter list if you reverse the question and ask for restaurants where there is space between the tables.

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It may be a shorter list if you reverse the question and ask for restaurants where there is space between the tables.

Now that I think of it you're exactly correct Phil. One's elbow is usually in somebody else's veloute. Plus I dine with a maxilingual friend who will start schmoozing with anyone within 10 feet. I'm among those asocial beings who doesn't like cross-table chatter anywhere, doesn't like to be touched by the waitstaff and hates B&B breakfasts.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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It may be a shorter list if you reverse the question and ask for restaurants where there is space between the tables.

Now that I think of it you're exactly correct Phil. One's elbow is usually in somebody else's veloute. Plus I dine with a maxilingual friend who will start schmoozing with anyone within 10 feet. I'm among those asocial beings who doesn't like cross-table chatter anywhere, doesn't like to be touched by the waitstaff and hates B&B breakfasts.

I am one of those who loves to interact with people.Specially when i am alone.

Great places with communal tables are.La cantine de troquet,la cave de l'os a moele,afaria, etc

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I'm with John. A man after my own heart.

My wife on the other hand is like John's friend. She'll start a conversation with anybody anywhere.

In my experience ad hoc restaurant neighbor conversations run about 7 to 1 bad or embarrassing per good/ interesting, C'est la vie.

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While we are in the Talbot/Hatfield camp, friends travelling with us split off one evening and went to Allard. They loved it, not the least for your reason. They were seated in an English speaking area and soon were chatting with several couples from as many countries. They said that the food was quite alright and that it was great fun to exchange travel stories with fellow diners. They also raved about the old Paris decor and ambience.

(Visitors often complain about being segregated in an Anglo area, but if you have one waiter who speaks fluent English and the rest do not, it makes some sense to group diners by language.)


eGullet member #80.

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While we are in the Talbot/Hatfield camp, friends travelling with us split off one evening and went to Allard.  They loved it, not the least for your reason.  They were seated in an English speaking area and soon were chatting with several couples from as many countries.  They said that the food was quite alright and that it was great fun to exchange travel stories with fellow diners.  They also raved about the old Paris decor and ambience.

(Visitors often complain about being segregated in an Anglo area, but if you have one waiter who speaks fluent English and the rest do not, it makes some sense to group diners by language.)

Stop me if you've heard this one before. In 1968 we went to Allard with friends and were speaking English to each other and French to the staff and a doctor from the sticks sitting next to us, almost hissed at us in French "How did you "discover" this place," implying "it's mine."

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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