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DonnaMarieNJ

Bloomfield-Montclair CSA

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From what I understand, a CSA is more expensive than the supermarket, but the most inexpensive way to get organic veggies. Am I correct? I had never heard of a CSA before this week, and found out they do not all work the same way. A full share for me wouldn't work, because it would be too much food, so I will be asking to share with someone.

All in all, are CSAs worth it? And does anyone know the Bloomfield CSA?

Thanks!!

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Hi Donna Marie,

i heard about this last fall and am also curious. How much does this one cost?

Karen

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Here is the site - it depends on what you want:

bloomfield-montclaircsa.org

It is kinda pricey - not certain it is worth it.

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I am a member of the Montclair-Bloomfield CSA. Although I don't use 100% organic produce, I try to do so as much as possible. This is worthwhile way to have a steady supply of wonderful produce and as a bonus you are supporting your local farmers.

Last year, I belonged to another CSA but switched this year because of this one is closer and more convenient. Right now, we have had only two weeks of pickups, and today is the third. The produce has been nice although not as plentiful as it will be as we get further into the growing season.

The thing that I most enjoy is the fact that I am forced to be introduced to items that I have never had before. Last year, I had garlic scapes for the first time. They are wonderful and couldn't wait to get them this year. This early on, we have a lot of greens - plain and attached to radishes, beets, and turnips. Salad lettuces and broccoli are also nice right now. The herbs are nice and the peas have been fantastic.

The other nice thing about being a member of a CSA is that there are other things that are available. Every two weeks we can order eggs and/or chickens from Havenwood Farms which are delivered to our pick up spot. We also had an opportunity purchase flats of blueberries. Our farmer from Star Brite also offers fruit shares which he doesn't grow, but he delivers.

All in all, I enjoy the CSA experience. It's nice to eat local food that is in season.

Marie


NJDuchess

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There wasn't an opening for me at Bloomfield-Montclair. However, Purple Dragon had an opening in Glen Ridge and I joined them.

I'm not certain how long I can be a member. There is so much food, even tho I share with someone. I'm not happy with the fruit so far, but the veggies have been pretty good.

I love the idea, but cannot keep it up if I end up wasting the food. I keep looking for new recipes to cook all of it, but when you're cooking for one, it's hard to come up with recipes that are suitable.

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Another option, if you want more flexibility than the CSAs, is www.doortodoororganics.com . I've used them off & on over the last two years or so. They're not all local, though they're all organic. For us, I'm interested in quality, variety, and less pesticides, so it works for me. It's almost certainly not the most environmentally friendly option (although, iirc Purple Dragon flies in some of their produce, too, esp in the winter). I like that Door to Door delivers right to my front door, and I can skip stuff I don't like, instead of wasting it. Finally, they have a lot of variety in sizes, which also helps. Now that we're settling into a new house, I'm debating between Door to Door for convience or the local farmer's market.


Joanna G. Hurley

"Civilization means food and literature all round." -Aldous Huxley

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One thing I love about these groups is that you get to try something you may not be familiar with. I ate my first kale last week, and this pick-up I have collard greens. Today I ate my first mango. I thought I died and went to heaven! I had no idea how to cook the kale or the collard greens, so I went to the internet. I did that also when I received the mango. A Google search told me that a mango's skin was edible, not edible, poisonous and not poisonous. What the heck? To be safe, I skinned the mango and ate the skin like an artichoke leaf, just scraped the flesh off the skin with my teeth. I'm sure I ingested whatever poisons there were on the skin, but I didn't care - it was divine.

I have more veggies and fruits than I know what to do with, but it's an interesting experience!

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