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mousse in test tubes


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so we are trying to plate our mousse desert in a different way, and our owner wanted cylintrical shapes, so we decided to try test tubes...and so far the results are horrible, only in the way that when they come out they look like a straight up dookie (chocolate mousse)

I wasnted to know if anybody out there had a trick to give them a more polished look. we are doing them in glass tubes with both ends cut off, we have been filling them and freezing them, and pushing them out (god that sounds bad)...

any thoughts would be appreciated.

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they will look cool if you give them a velour finnish. get an airless spraying gun at you local hardware store (50$ or so) fill it up with 50% chocolate and 50% cocoa butter. now place the still frozen cylinders on a baking sheet and coat them.

cheers

t.

Edited by schneich (log)

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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I was thinking the same thing, or you could use some MG ingredients to make it flexible which would allow you to form it into a pretzel, knot, etc. I'm also thinking it might be how your present it. A tube lying on the plate looks like a dookie. A tube skewered on something sticking out the plate with say a fruit crisp on the end might be a bit more dookie glitz!

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Or what about cutting the rounded end off and then spraying it. Depending on the length maybe cutting it in half would make it easier to be creative with.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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Are these horizontal? How about a sandwich of two thin rectangles of tempered chocolate or tuile or meringue? You could still stick something into the sides if they are vertical, or if the diameter allows, cut them in half and offset the two halves.

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Lining your cylinder molds with acetate will get you a nice glossy finish. Unless the problem is air pockets, which means your mousse is the wrong consistency for this application. If you are using cylinder molds then your product needs to be of a pour-able consistency.

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take parchment paper cut into rectangles same size as a cannoli tube. Wrap it around. Secure with scotch tape then slide off. Stand vertical in a 6 pan or other vesserl that will keep them standing. Fill. Freeze solid. Unwrap then dip into tempered chocolate or use good coating chocolate

"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

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take parchment paper cut into rectangles same size as a cannoli tube. Wrap it around. Secure with scotch tape then slide off. Stand vertical in a 6 pan or other vesserl that will keep them standing. Fill. Freeze solid. Unwrap then dip into tempered chocolate or use good coating chocolate

along these lines, saw a neat technique in one pastry mag - first do this technique. Then do it again. Now you have a tube of mousse/coulis/whatever inside another tube of mousse.

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