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Food and wine matching


cnspriggs
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Do you have any books you think are really great for the food and wine matching suggestions? I know there are lots of books with matches but many times they are recommendations of wines with recipes that don't clash and haven't really dug into the flavours of the food and the wine to create a special harmony.

I'm looking for something that really delves into the subject and doesn't regurgitate the 'classics'.

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The definitive work is What to Eat with What You Drink, an outstanding book by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. It covers a wide variety of drinks but is largely focused on wine. I can't imagine an improvement on it, frankly.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Do you have any books you think are really great for the food and wine matching suggestions? I know there are lots of books with matches but many times they are recommendations of wines with recipes that don't clash and haven't really dug into the flavours of the food and the wine to create a special harmony.

I'm looking for something that really delves into the subject and doesn't regurgitate the 'classics'.

Ultimately, when you have, of if you have, become aware of the different wines out there by having tasted them, what works with food is what works with your palate! I mean, that's when it all comes together, right?

I had some Hershey's chocolate with almonds a little while ago. I paired it with a cheap Idaho riesling and it worked fine. (Why the cheap Idaho riesling? Because that's what I had on hand—this being without a job thing, you know).

Anyway, I thought, "What the hek," and I gave it a try. It worked fine. Muted the chocolate a bit, but it didn't create a "yuck!" sensation.

It's what works for you!

Starkman

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  • 2 weeks later...
The definitive work is What to Eat with What You Drink, an outstanding book by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. It covers a wide variety of drinks but is largely focused on wine. I can't imagine an improvement on it, frankly.

I second this. This book never leaves my desk and I use it several times a week to get ideas.

“"When you wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what's the first thing you say to yourself?"

"What's for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?"

"I say, I wonder what's going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet.

Pooh nodded thoughtfully.

"It's the same thing," he said.”

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Here is the perfect cookbook for you. "The Gourmet Bachelor" by Chad Carns

Each recipe is paired with particular wine. for example:

Coriander-spiced duck breast pineapple relish- paired with Pinot Noir, Carneros

Tuna ceviche crisp plantains red pepper sauce- paired with Albino, Spain

The book is about simple ingredients and global flavor. It has a great wine section and beautiful photography. The book might not be out yet. I think release date is May 2009. I get see cookbooks way before they released (I am special like that) well… check it out

The Gourmet Bachelor.com

new york food photographer: Helping the food look beautiful
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I almost bought What to drink with... yesterday, but ultimately decided against it. It is an excellent book, no doubt, and if you're really into wine - and all kinds of different wines are in your cellar - it's really a great book.

Personally I like wine, but never have more than 20 bottles in the house, if it's ever that many. There are lots of exotic wines in the book that I'd never own. To me the book would be overkill. I'd suggest to first look at it in the store.

Also, as somebody above mentioned, ultimately it comes down to your own taste, no matter what others say. I've read somewhere that a good sommelier first and foremost knows how to read people and is able to match the wine to the person first, then the food. Seems to make sense to me. And that's of course something no book can do.

We subscribe to a 3bottle/month wine club from a local store. The bottles range in the $15-25 area from all over the world. There's always a little newsletter in there that suggests some foods the wine would be good with, I use that as guideline with success. Often trying to pair the wine with a dish from the same region, which is fun.

As the book covers other drinkables too, I will probably get it in the future, but for now I went with a cook book instead.

So, it is an outstanding book, but unless you're really into wine (I tend to prefer beer on a day to day basis) you will love it. If you're more looking for the occasional hint it might be overkill. Maybe see if there's a wine club in your area? I always like the surprise and then planning some food to go with the wines we got that month.

Just my 2 sips :-)

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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