Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

European Style


Chapel Tavern
 Share

Recommended Posts

Theyre called glass washers.

Some hard-core serious beer bars have them, but not very many on th east Coast; I've seen them in Portland OR and Denver and San Diego, so far.

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I've seen these in action at The Trappist in Oakland, CA but am a little put off by the amount of water that stays in the glass. I don't want to my beer watered down, even if it's by a very small amount of water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beverage Factory, a restaurant supply house that specializes in draught beer systems,  calls them "rinser drip trays" on their website.

The Triumph Brewery (a brewpub in Princeton, NJ) is one east coast bar I've seen them in.  (I suspect Rich has been there, as well  :smile: ).

Thanks for the help. I tried to google "Glass Washer Tray" but of course only commercial dishwasher type stuff came up. They are actually cheaper than I thought they would be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen these in action at The Trappist in Oakland, CA but am a little put off by the amount of water that stays in the glass. I don't want to my beer watered down, even if it's by a very small amount of water.

I totally understand the thought process on that but according to most authorities on the subject, Cicerone Certification Program included, the best way to get a proper head is to use a wet glass. I've tried it both ways and it really does seem to produce a great head and, as far as I could tell, didn't water down the beer or affect the taste at all.

Anyone else have thoughts on the subject?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Strange, because I had always thought the opposite - that using them would stop a decent head from forming. Been quite a few years since I pulled a pint (Parents used to be pub landlords) but I'm sure I was told to only ever use a perfectly dry glass.

I love animals.

They are delicious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My former boss used to own a beerhouse and he said the reason why people started using this mechanism is because when you machine-wash a beer glass it causes a static charge to build up in the glass, and in addition the glass would be polished afterwards - thus increasing the static charge even more. The water that goes in to the glass first "discharges" the pent up electricity and therefore the beer has a free run. Now I do not know if this is actually 100% accurate, it never is with these fields of glassware where no actual scientific data exists. I remember reading an article in a champagne magazine about always polishing champagne flutes with a cloth that would leave little fibers in the glass, so that the pearls would form properly, and never to polish the glasses too "perfect", otherwise the aforementioned static charge would interfere with the champagne.

The perfect vichyssoise is served hot and made with equal parts of butter to potato.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I think that i'd be more worried about residue in the glasses from dust, or left over dishwashing items than I would be about a little water. Remember you invert the glass to wash it out so 99.9% of the water drips out of hte glass. I find that having a slightly wet glass does help with the head etc. To an extent where even when i'm home I'll give a quick rinse. I don't have one of these fancy things yet though when i build my home kegerator etc set up I will be adding one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By adey73
      I've read a few allegations and disputes in the American craft brewing news about macho "bro"  culture, in recent months.
       
      Now the Scottish brewery whose PR quickly capitalised on Boris Johnson's senior advisor Dominic Cummings travelling from London to Barnard Castle for a claimed eye test, (while everyone else was in lockdown and the elderly were dying in care homes) swiftly launched a beer to celebrate such hypocrisy called  'Barnard Castle Eye test' https://www.brewdog.com/uk/barnard-castle-eye-test 
       
      This week however former and current employees signed an open letter highlighting the companies array of low quality manoeuvres all in the name of their Espirt de Corps "Beer, People and Planet....   
       
       
       
       
      But in response 'The Tsar didn't know'
       
      https://www.instagram.com/p/CP-2JyiJtvb/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link
       
    • By liuzhou
      It seems that the legendary traditional appearance and accoutrements of witches may have actually risen because they were conjuring up beer rather than malign entities from beyond.
       
       
      The full article is here.
       
    • By liuzhou
      Picked this up this morning, not because I wanted it, just to add to my collection of silliness.
       

       
       
       
      Love the brewery's honesty in their choice of name.
       
      My only question is "Why? I mean "Why?'" (to be uttered in a tone of despair).
       
      It tastes like some one had a glass of grapefruit juice with breakfast and then forgot to wash the glass before pouring a beer hours later.
       
    • By liuzhou
      500 years ago, Martin Luther started off the Reformation. In a way, this not only changed religious affairs in Europe, but also changed our beer.
       
      Article here.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...