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feedmec00kies

Help! Cake transport question!

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Hi all,

Soooo... A few days ago, I had posted a query about buying a flourless chocolate cake for a Passover seder in the NY forums, but I'm now baking it from a recipe given to me by the host. Several issues have arisen from this...

Most importantly, I'm going to make the cake tonight, for the seder tomorrow, and it will have to be transported by subway and train to Westchester. I also don't have a cake carrying container, but I do have some time there before the seder starts. Do I:

* Leave the cake in the springform pan until we get there tomorrow (Will the cake sort of "overcook" from residual heat if left in the pan? Should I loosen the pan and then close it back for transport? Will the parchment paper stick too much to the cake, or will the cake stick to the pan?)

* Go out and buy a cake transportation device

* Something I haven't thought of

I'm going to give myself an ulcer worrying about this, meanwhile. :wacko: Any help is appreciated.


"I know it's the bugs, that's what cheese is. Gone off milk with bugs and mould - that's why it tastes so good. Cows and bugs together have a good deal going down."

- Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry), Chef!

eG Ethics Signatory

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I would suggest that you leave the cake in the pan, open the sides until cooled, then close back up for transportation.

I hate schlepping my work back to PA from school in NYC. What I started doing is to use a strip of double-faced foam mounting tape on the bottom of the box. Then I place the cake or cake dummy on top, but I do not press it down. The weight of the item holds it on the tape enough to keep it secure, while not so much that I can't remove the cake from the box upon arrival. Just a small strip, about 4 inches, does the trick for me.

Theresa :biggrin:


"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power."

- Abraham Lincoln

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Oh the problems us egulleters have!! And the stress they cause! I couldn't fall asleep cause the marker ink transferred onto my ugly chocolate bowl!

My Gran would say"Oi gevalt! Should all your problems be so sweet!!" :biggrin:

Best of luck and happy holidays!!!

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I'd rather remove the cake from the springform at home than at someone else's house (I'd rather look awkward without an audience!). Are you going to decant it onto a cake round or onto a plate?

I make my flourless cake in an 8" springform pan. After I decant it onto an 8" round (which is always a little bigger than the cake), I've transported it on the round in an 8 1/2" springform pan, so the sides are protected, but the whole thing isn't slipping around. (I put a piece of green no-slip fabric under the round, even though it isn't really necessary.) If you put the cake onto a plate, you'd need a bigger pan, of course.

Aside: I adore my cake carriers. It's a little late now, but my Sunday paper usually has an insert for Michael's Craft Stores, with a 40% off coupon for one item. Wilton's round cake carrier is then an incredible bargain. (But it's only $10 at Amazon without a coupon--Wilton Cake Carrier)


Life is short. Eat the roasted cauliflower first.

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I'd rather remove the cake from the springform at home than at someone else's house (I'd rather look awkward without an audience!).  Are you going to decant it onto a cake round or onto a plate?

Awkwardness isn't an issue; people are supposed to show up at 5, but I'll be getting there an hour or two early to help with last-minute things.


"I know it's the bugs, that's what cheese is. Gone off milk with bugs and mould - that's why it tastes so good. Cows and bugs together have a good deal going down."

- Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry), Chef!

eG Ethics Signatory

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I don't know how you remove your cake. Me, I chill my cake, then warm the bottom and sides with a wet cloth, then sloooooowly open and remove the springform, then flip it, then warm the bottom again, then slooooowly remove the bottom, so there's lots of room for awkwardity, especially given my natural leanings that way!

If it's no big deal for you, then just take the cake in the springform and deal with it there. (But then, why are we talking about it? :blink: )


Life is short. Eat the roasted cauliflower first.

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