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Top Chef: Season 6 – Las Vegas


Chris Hennes
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Previous Top Chef Seasons on the eGullet Forums:

Season 1: San Francisco

Season 2: Los Angeles

Season 3: Miami Beach

Season 4: Chicago

Season 5: New York

Well, season five practically just ended and rumors are already flying about season six. Bravo hasn't announced where it's going to be held yet, but Toby Young has apparently tweeted about filming in Seattle. Las Vegas has also gained traction in the rumor mill. Considering the amount of discussion in the Season 5 topic about how little of New York was used in the show, I'm not sure it matters.

Casting has begun: Any eGullet members auditioning for the show this year?

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Wouldn't San Francisco be fun?

“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”
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While I'm always intrigued as to what city will actually be named as the host of Top Chef, I tend to agree with Chris-I'm not sure it actually matters.

While last season's show was billed as "Top Chef-New York," it actually ended up as "Top Chef-New Orleans." I don't disagree with the fact that New Orleans is a great American restaurant city-but why not leave well enough alone? If it's "Top Chef-New York," keep it there. All season.

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While I'm always intrigued as to what city will actually be named as the host of Top Chef, I tend to agree with Chris-I'm not sure it actually matters. 

While last season's show was billed as "Top Chef-New York," it actually ended up as "Top Chef-New Orleans."  I don't disagree with the fact that New Orleans is a great American restaurant city-but why not leave well enough alone?  If it's "Top Chef-New York," keep it there.  All season.

I think that they like to reward themselves, and the final chefs, with a trip. Aspen, Las Vegas, Puerto Rico, New Orleans...

However, other seasons had done a better job with incorporating the city into the challenges. Last season could've been Top Chef: TV Studio with New Orleans thrown in at the end.

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While last season's show was billed as "Top Chef-New York," it actually ended up as "Top Chef-New Orleans." I don't disagree with the fact that New Orleans is a great American restaurant city-but why not leave well enough alone? If it's "Top Chef-New York," keep it there. All season.

I would only point out that it is standard practice on the show to hold the finals in a different site. Top Chef Chicago ended up in Puerto Rico and I think another season ended up in Aspen.

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  • 3 weeks later...

As long as there is a Whole Foods in town, anywhere is fair game...

(still looking forward to the show, but for me a location would come more alive if they did a lot more showcasing of local ingredients and markets)

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As long as there is a Whole Foods in town, anywhere is fair game...

(still looking forward to the show, but for me a location would come more alive if they did a lot more showcasing of local ingredients and markets)

Yep, just googled "Whole Foods Las Vegas" and there are at least three locations.....so this could be a lock! Since that's only real significance to whatever city they choose.....my guess is they'll be shopping at the new location on Las Vegas Blvd.

Jerry

Kansas City, Mo.

Unsaved Loved Ones

My eG Food Blog- 2011

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On Sunday, Norm Clarke wrote in his column for the Review-Journal that filming for Top Chef Season 6 was starting this week in Las Vegas.

I don't care where they tape it as long as they get some great chefs this time around!!! :rolleyes:

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On Sunday, Norm Clarke wrote in his column for the Review-Journal that filming for Top Chef Season 6 was starting this week in Las Vegas.

I don't care where they tape it as long as they get some great chefs this time around!!! :rolleyes:

If Norm was correct in his column, and he's usually right on with things, the filming is underway in Las Vegas. I'll be there next week and I'll see what I can find out.

While I'd like to think that the city doesn't matter, I'm sure the producers will find some way to use Las Vegas to its full, dramatic effect. Of course, that's assuming on my part that the show will be shot in Las Vegas.

And we can all wait with great anticipation for the return of a resident chef in Las Vegas-the man some loved to hate-Marcel. I'm wondering if he'll appear as a judge or in his recurring role as a Sous Chef.

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after watching Top Chef: New York, I think the city is essentially meaningless. NYC is arguably the culinary Mecca of the United States. But they didn't really showcase the city too well. Seems that the producers don't want the Cheftestants to be seen running around town. Kind of a shame, really, but I guess word travels fast via the intranets these days, and they don't want anything spoiled..

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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after watching Top Chef: New York,  I think the city is essentially meaningless.   NYC is arguably the culinary Mecca of the  United States. But they didn't really showcase the city too well.   Seems that the producers don't want the Cheftestants to be seen running around town.  Kind of a shame, really, but I guess word travels fast via the intranets these days, and they don't want anything spoiled..

I wonder whether having it in a dense city like New York made it logistically difficult to "showcase" the city itself. I mean, they did get out, but the outside stuff was out of the City (except for Ep 1), and otherwise they just moved from one inside to another. And they were certainly not sheltered from members of the internet using public.

What did people have in mind? A BBQ in Central Park? Quick eats at Grand Central Station? If the idea has any merit, at least Vegas is a lot more spread out, and it's a city created for entertainment, so maybe there will be more splashy site challenges.

Edited by Dignan (log)
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I'll be in Las Vegas next month; hope they will still be filming. Surely it will be possible to hear gossip.

I am guessing that sometimes they avoid doing too many things to showcase the city, because those things would be more apt to create spoilers. When they filmed in Chicago we would always hear about where they had been seen. Usually it was stuff that didn't help you figure out much.

Edited to add: New York Times catches up with some former contestants:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/03/nyregion...?pagewanted=all

I've been following Blais on Twitter. (And Grant Achatz.)

Edited by Tess (log)
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I am guessing that  sometimes they avoid doing too many things to showcase the city, because those things would be more apt to create spoilers.

People on the show have confirmed this: they are pretty much compelled to keep everything indoors or in obscure places, because otherwise it would be pretty clear who was eliminated.
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I am guessing that  sometimes they avoid doing too many things to showcase the city, because those things would be more apt to create spoilers.

People on the show have confirmed this: they are pretty much compelled to keep everything indoors or in obscure places, because otherwise it would be pretty clear who was eliminated.

In nearly every judges table challenge, there are members of the public involved in the events they stage. I would think there would be more danger of leaks when the people involved know exactly what's going on, as opposed to random proles on NYC sidewalks who stop and take a gander.

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I am guessing that  sometimes they avoid doing too many things to showcase the city, because those things would be more apt to create spoilers.

People on the show have confirmed this: they are pretty much compelled to keep everything indoors or in obscure places, because otherwise it would be pretty clear who was eliminated.

In nearly every judges table challenge, there are members of the public involved in the events they stage. I would think there would be more danger of leaks when the people involved know exactly what's going on, as opposed to random proles on NYC sidewalks who stop and take a gander.

You will note that those challenges are always under "controlled conditions." I am sure that those who participate are asked to sign confidentiality agreements, or at the very least, are lectured sternly about the importance of preserving the show's element of surprise. I am not sure what they do, but I guarantee it's something, and it seems to work.

Now contrast this with, say, holding an event in the middle of Central Park, where any random person can just walk by, snap a cell phone photo, tap something into twitter, and so forth. Under those conditions, it really would be impossible to prevent spoilers from being pretty widely disseminated.

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I am guessing that  sometimes they avoid doing too many things to showcase the city, because those things would be more apt to create spoilers.

People on the show have confirmed this: they are pretty much compelled to keep everything indoors or in obscure places, because otherwise it would be pretty clear who was eliminated.

In nearly every judges table challenge, there are members of the public involved in the events they stage. I would think there would be more danger of leaks when the people involved know exactly what's going on, as opposed to random proles on NYC sidewalks who stop and take a gander.

You will note that those challenges are always under "controlled conditions." I am sure that those who participate are asked to sign confidentiality agreements, or at the very least, are lectured sternly about the importance of preserving the show's element of surprise. I am not sure what they do, but I guarantee it's something, and it seems to work.

Now contrast this with, say, holding an event in the middle of Central Park, where any random person can just walk by, snap a cell phone photo, tap something into twitter, and so forth. Under those conditions, it really would be impossible to prevent spoilers from being pretty widely disseminated.

Sure they do "something," but seems like there's no way to gaurantee that in a roomfull of culinary students, like in the football challenge, an anonymous internet post about what happened won't occur. They ain't. You could have them all sign an encyclopedia's worth of papers. How would you determine which person in that roomfull, who otherwise have no stake in the show or competition, posted about it? Or in the restaurant challenge. Or at Blue Hill Farms. Or at Natasha Richard's shindig. The only way to ensure what you say they are trying to ensure is to have no outsiders at all. Of course, unless you meant a double secret stern lecture.

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I am guessing that  sometimes they avoid doing too many things to showcase the city, because those things would be more apt to create spoilers.

People on the show have confirmed this: they are pretty much compelled to keep everything indoors or in obscure places, because otherwise it would be pretty clear who was eliminated.

In nearly every judges table challenge, there are members of the public involved in the events they stage. I would think there would be more danger of leaks when the people involved know exactly what's going on, as opposed to random proles on NYC sidewalks who stop and take a gander.

You will note that those challenges are always under "controlled conditions." I am sure that those who participate are asked to sign confidentiality agreements, or at the very least, are lectured sternly about the importance of preserving the show's element of surprise. I am not sure what they do, but I guarantee it's something, and it seems to work.

Now contrast this with, say, holding an event in the middle of Central Park, where any random person can just walk by, snap a cell phone photo, tap something into twitter, and so forth. Under those conditions, it really would be impossible to prevent spoilers from being pretty widely disseminated.

Sure they do "something," but seems like there's no way to gaurantee that in a roomfull of culinary students, like in the football challenge, an anonymous internet post about what happened won't occur. They ain't. You could have them all sign an encyclopedia's worth of papers. How would you determine which person in that roomfull, who otherwise have no stake in the show or competition, posted about it? Or in the restaurant challenge. Or at Blue Hill Farms. Or at Natasha Richard's shindig. The only way to ensure what you say they are trying to ensure is to have no outsiders at all. Of course, unless you meant a double secret stern lecture.

It's interesting. You would think there would be more leaks than there are. People are certainly hungry for the information. When the show filmed here in Chicago, there was a lot of gossip about who was seen where. Yet somehow, no one ever seems to know much.

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