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ISO custom transfer sheets for chocolate wafers/discs


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for such a small number, it might not be cost effective to do it this way. most places call for a large amount of money up front for set up and a minimum order of several hundred (i ordered from American Chocolate Designs a few years ago, but price wasn't an object for the order).

here is another site that claims to make custom transfer sheets but they don't have any info readily available on their site.

is there another way to do this, like just making a piped design...monogram or something for the top of the dessert?

edited to add: some places do generic messages that might be cheaper, but if your customer wants something very specific you might be out of luck. you could always ask Kerry to help you out since she's sort of figured out the whole silkscreening thing! don't kill me Kerry :wink:

Edited by alanamoana (log)
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thanks. And Alana, I showed the pricing to the customers and they said, "Oh, that's not bad" which gave me a clue as to what range I could price my pastries :) They would need to buy 1000, so I suggested they make little gift bags with a business card sized note thanking their guests for attending along with the extra chocolates - they loved that idea. And as for the design...1) my piping skills are not where they need to be and 2) it is a very intricate monogram.

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I just noticed on Tomric's site that they are doing them as well - 3 to 4 week lead time.  Look under ingredients.

Kerry.

We can do them faster than that if needed . . .but for the project in question an inexpensive mould sounds good too and clearly, that's in our (Tomric's) wheelhouse.

brian

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I know that American something or other in Atlanta does them, but I have an event that conflicts with their vacation schedule.  Are there others in the US that are doing custom wafer?  This will go on top of 80 pastries I'm making for a wedding.

Chef Rubber makes custom transfer sheets.

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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Thanks everyone. I'm definitely in no position to make my own transfers and really I'm not interested in punching out 80 circles especially since the customer is willing to pay. They accepted my bid yesterday which included buying a short case of 1 1/4" discs from American Chocolates which worked out to be .24 per disc for 240 discs and a guarantee that I would have them in hand a week before the event. Good deal all around in this instance.

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...I'm not interested in punching out 80 circles...

just for future reference: there are sheets you can get from chef rubber, called chablons, that are used for making chocolate discs and other shapes in bulk by spreading tempered chocolate on them. you can also have transfers made to fit your chablons and thus make your own custom items.

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I just inquired with my local chocolatier, CFC Chocolates, about signature transfer sheets and Chef Patrick said the one time set up fee is $275 using his source, which he didn't declare. I can ask if your interested.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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