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So Good : The Magazine of Haute Pâtisserie


Chris Hennes
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I got the email too. Have no idea what the magazine is like. If you can order a single issue for $10, I might check it out. If I have to commit to a subscription at $10 an issue without having seen it... no thanks.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Yes I received the same email and then looked at it a bit closer and then realized that it cost $7.80 for shipping and an additional $5.00 for Chef Rubber's "handing charge". Thats $22+ for a single issue, no thanks

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  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I was able to buy a copy from Chef Rubber's booth at the World Pastry Forum for $10 cash. It has a substantial hard paper cover, lots of photos plus in-depth interviews and recipes. I like it. Dunno if I can afford to subscribe at $22 a pop, though. My guess is that CR is shipping in special padded envelopes, thus the handling fee.

I was lucky enough to get my copy autographed by Albert Adria, with whom I had several interesting late-night conversations. So, my copy has special meaning to me and I will admit a bit of bias.

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  • 5 months later...

I'll second Lisa's opinion.

I just received both of the available issues and am VERY impressed!!!

# 1 with the Albert Adria interview ( one that I've never seen) right when "Natura" was published and must have been done fairly close to when he resigned from el Bulli.

#2 has an interesting interview with Alex Stupak of wd-50 along with his recipe for caramelised brioche that is is prepared with transglutaminase (Activa, also referred to as "Meat Glue" 'round here).

Dominique Ansel of Restaurant Daniel, too many to name.

Thicker then an issue of Art Culinaire ( x2), great photos and a GREAT info/recipe to advert ratio, 19 bucks an issue + shipping was well worth it.

2317/5000

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 year later...

I was reading in the education section of Albert Ulster's website and got turned onto the "So Good" magazine and did a google search and found this thread. While looking through the magazine's website there were some recipes and one was for a nougat from Michel Willaume. There was a link to his website and I clicked on it http://www.mwpastry.com/en/index_en.php and on the home page it shows a chocolate sculpture...and I thought I would pick all of your brains as to how the heck he got that amazing wood grain in a sculpture piece? I've seen how to do wood grains on transfer sheets, but not sculptures. I was in awe! Any ideas???

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There was a link to his website and I clicked on it http://www.mwpastry.com/en/index_en.php and on the home page it shows a chocolate sculpture...and I thought I would pick all of your brains as to how the heck he got that amazing wood grain in a sculpture piece? I've seen how to do wood grains on transfer sheets, but not sculptures. I was in awe! Any ideas???

The layers seem quite parallel, so I suppose he did something like this:

- pour a medium-thin layer of white chocolate in the big mold;

- wait until it starts to set, shake the mold to give some ondulations to the surface just to not get it completely plain;

- pour a thin layer of milk chocolate (the ratio white/milk seems like 3/1) in the big mold;

- wait until it starts to set, shake the mold to give some ondulations to the surface just to not get it completely plain;

- repeat.

The "wood effect" is given mainly by the curves of the surfaces from the angle of this photo, if they took a frontal photo you would just see parallel layers.

Teo

Teo

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The layers seem quite parallel, so I suppose he did something like this:

- pour a medium-thin layer of white chocolate in the big mold;

- wait until it starts to set, shake the mold to give some ondulations to the surface just to not get it completely plain;

- pour a thin layer of milk chocolate (the ratio white/milk seems like 3/1) in the big mold;

- wait until it starts to set, shake the mold to give some ondulations to the surface just to not get it completely plain;

- repeat.

The "wood effect" is given mainly by the curves of the surfaces from the angle of this photo, if they took a frontal photo you would just see parallel layers.

Teo

Aha! Thanks! He has WAY more patience than I do! :raz:

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