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Chocolot

PDF texture

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I know I am late to the PDF party, but I am here now :rolleyes: I made a fresh strawberry PDF using PDF pectin. It is nicely firm, but not tough. I took a sample to my favorite trained pastry chef and she said while the flavor was nice, it was too soft for her tastes. She cooks hers to a soft ball which makes them rather firm. It got me thinking that I don't really know what the texture should be. What do you all think? Mine is about the firmness of egg white in a hard-cooked egg. I cooked them to 211 F but at sea level that is the same as 221 F. I don't have a refractometer. Thanks for any input.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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I know I am late to the PDF party, but I am here now :rolleyes:  I made a fresh strawberry PDF using PDF pectin.  It is nicely firm, but not tough.  I took a sample to my favorite trained pastry chef and she said while the flavor was nice, it was too soft for her tastes.  She cooks hers to a soft ball which makes them rather firm.  It got me thinking that I don't really know what the texture should be.  What do you all think?  Mine is about the firmness of egg white in a hard-cooked egg.  I cooked them to 211 F but at sea level that is the same as 221 F.  I don't have a refractometer.  Thanks for any input.

to be honest i think that is completely subjective. i actually like mine softer because i don't like it when it sort of sticks to my teeth too much, which can happen when they're cooked longer.

sounds like your texture would be nice.

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Today at work I thought about how I would describe the firmness of pate de fruit (remembering reading your question). I reminisced back to once upon a time when I made an apple pate de fruit which came out soft (how I imagine you describing yours) and it was crystallized on the outside with virtually no resistance in the middle. Then I thought about an overcooked batch of mango pate de fruit, which came out a little too leathery and you had to struggle a little to get your teeth all the way through, just for it to stick to your teeth, as alana said (obviously being dramatic). This is where I think describing it becomes subjective- you need to have enough resistance to need to bite but not bite hard & feel like you have to chew.

Something a little more objective: Every pate de fruit recipe I ever remember seeing/making was cooked to 106-107 Celsius (222.8-224.6 Fahrenheit). Maybe you just need to cook it another couple of degrees Fahrenheit. Good things come to those who wait- the last degree takes the longest!

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Today at work I thought about how I would describe the firmness of pate de fruit (remembering reading your question). I reminisced back to once upon a time when I made an apple pate de fruit which came out soft (how I imagine you describing yours) and it was crystallized on the outside with virtually no resistance in the middle. Then I thought about an overcooked batch of mango pate de fruit, which came out a little too leathery and you had to struggle a little to get your teeth all the way through, just for it to stick to your teeth, as alana said (obviously being dramatic). This is where I think describing it becomes subjective- you need to have enough resistance to need to bite but not bite hard & feel like you have to chew.

Something a little more objective: Every pate de fruit recipe I ever remember seeing/making was cooked to 106-107 Celsius (222.8-224.6 Fahrenheit). Maybe you just need to cook it another couple of degrees Fahrenheit. Good things come to those who wait- the last degree takes the longest!

Thank you! I'm thinking I need to cook just a bit more. Actually, I cooked to the equivalent of 222F I live at 5000 feet, so I subtract 10 degrees. I tried to tear a piece to test for how firm it is, and I can tear with some resistance. The tougher pdf my friend makes, can't be torn with your fingers. Thanks for your input.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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...Actually, I cooked to the equivalent of 222F  I live at 5000 feet, so I subtract 10 degrees...

Does that really make sense when cooking sugar/making caramel?

When cooking sugar, we use the temperature as an indication of water content (I guess?). Does the boiling point with respect to water content change with altitude?

Is there anything else that happens when you heat sugar to certain temperatures, like changes in the crystal structure?

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