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Filling chocolates with pannacotta?


Thornado
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I recently received some silicone demisphere molds. I have a party coming up, and I would like to use these for my dessert. My idea was to first create a "shell" chocolate in the molds (either by brushing the chocolate on, or the "fill up and pour out" method (though I worry that doing that would require more chocolate).

I would then (after the chocolate is set) like to fill them with a panna cotta and let that set, and then finally unmold them on plates to have nice panna cotta domes with a chocolate crust on them.

Is this a reasonable idea, or will the panna cotta release moisture that will mess up the chocolate shell in a bad way?

If it is reasonable to do, are there any special precautions I need to take (cover the molds or the chocolate with something, etc)?

Thanks

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I recently received some silicone demisphere molds. I have a party coming up, and I would like to use these for my dessert. My idea was to first create a "shell" chocolate in the molds (either by brushing the chocolate on, or the "fill up and pour out" method (though I worry that doing that would require more chocolate).

I would then (after the chocolate is set) like to fill them with a panna cotta and let that set, and then finally unmold them on plates to have nice panna cotta domes with a chocolate crust on them.

Is this a reasonable idea, or will the panna cotta release moisture that will mess up the chocolate shell in a bad way?

If it is reasonable to do, are there any special precautions I need to take (cover the molds or the chocolate with something, etc)?

Thanks

do you think you could just use the molds for the panna cotta, and just pour a chocolate glaze over the panna cotta? i know some glazes (basically a ganache with a bit more corn syrup) can set pretty firm, and get that "crack" you look for with a nice tempered chocolate shell....

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Sounds a bit risky, but would be cool if it worked.

Is the panna cotta still liquid enough to pour below about 85F?  You wouldn't want to melt the chocolate.

...would work ok but rather like Kees creme brulee chocolates would have a very limited shelf life...

For a dessert, made/eaten same day,no problem at all..

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Panna cotta doesn't have eggs (usually), just cream, flavors/sugar and gelatin.

Sounds like it might work, the key issue being how to keep the chocolate from melting. If you cooled the pana cotta just to the point it was about to set, and maybe refrigerated the molds, it might help.

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I just made an "instant" Panna cotta. I am sure it is far from the real thing. Iused cream instead of milk and made the "custard". Then I poured that onto white chocolate (equal in amount to the cream) and mixed. It is very tasty, a bit sweet. My issue is that while it tastes smooth it does not look smooth. When I am done I will take a photo. Itis cooling now and then I will try piping it into a shell.

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I recently received some silicone demisphere molds. I have a party coming up, and I would like to use these for my dessert. My idea was to first create a "shell" chocolate in the molds (either by brushing the chocolate on, or the "fill up and pour out" method (though I worry that doing that would require more chocolate).

Thanks

We used to do this with flexipan molds to make chocolate "coconuts" that we filled at service with a haupia mixture -- coconut milk, cornstarch, etc with whipped cream folded in. we put them open end up in a bed of fruit and they looked very cute.

while your idea sounds doable, I'd recommend doing the pannacotta and the shell independent of one another to retain the temper (and thus the crispness) of the chocolate. Then just put the shell on over the pannacotta when you serve.

I worked out that the fastest way to make shells that came out without damage was to get the chocolate as cold as possible within tempered range (a thin pudding consistency almost), put a heaping spoonful in the mold, and push it up the sides with the back of the spoon. having the chocolate cold let it cling instead of all dripping back down. Let hem all set, then flex each one out.

Hth...

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