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Chasing Michelin Stars


317indy
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Ive come a long ways. Working only at three places since ive started working in the culinary field, my resume is growing into something that Ive wanted it to. Ive only wanted to work at the best of the best, because one day I want to become one of the best. But where do I go after this? What have some of you other successful Chefs done after you've made the perfect resume?

I started out doing 350+ covers a night working @ Emerils, Then moved onto Fine dinning working @ Normans. This 4 Star 4 Diamond restaurant taught me alot during my year long stay there. Now Im doing 65 Covers a night working @ 5 Star 5 Diamond restaurant, nothing but top of the line ingredients, traditional French/American fare. This place is going to teach me alot more, and thats the only thing I crave. I have the inner need to work with only best of the best. I strive for perfection in everything for my career.

But I really want to know, where do I go from here? Michelin 3 Stars only in Europe? Per Se? The French Laundry? Robuchon?I really want to become one of the best chefs out there. Its been one of my dreams since I was 16, Im 25 now...Is it too late to become one of the best? Is one year to two years at each place good enough? How long do you stay at a place before you want to move on?

If you were a chef of a great, talented, successful restaurant how would my resume seem to you if I were applying today?

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Maybe you should study the people you idolize and want to be like. That may give you a better idea of what you want to do next.

Youll realize that even among the "top" chefs there is a great bit of difference in their work history an development.

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I would consider cooking more "craft" than a job. You sound like you have the necessary skills and tools. Start to develop your own style, your own passion for what you want to cook. Ask yourself what kind of restaurant would you happily go to every morning for the next 20 years.

Edited by GordonCooks (log)
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Seriously, at some point you must decide to either do your own thing, or just cook someone elses food for the rest of your life. The later can be rewarding in itself, low/no investment on your behalf. but your still cooking someone elses food. Lots of stars, but they have someone else name on them.

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Being the "Best" Chef is very subjective, do you want to be the best French Chef? What makes you the best chef? Your food? The way you treat your staff? I've had some of the best food in my life at some very small restaurants in the International district, and I have eaten at all the best restaurants in Seattle. Some of the "best chefs" out there are huge a holes to their cooks and don't pay them properly or provide basic heath insurance.

Find out what style of food you love best whether its four star french cuisine or simple yet perfect Piedmontese hand made stufffed pastas, or whatever else floats your boat.

Whats more important to chefs when they are looking for new cooks is the ability to cook their food, not someone elses. While you may have 3 great restaurants under your belt, but if you can only do a dish the way Emeril does it, than a new chef isn't gonna want to hire you. Be humble, be eager to learn, and always be respectful.

goodluck

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