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Brandy Substitution?


RDCollins
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I'm making a recipe for beef steak that's cut into small bite-sized pieces, marinated, and sauteed in a hearty sauce containing red wine, Dijon, garlic, etc.

It calls for 1 tablespoon of brandy in the marinade. I'm out of brandy but I have just about every other common liquor in the house -- several varies of rum, Jack Daniels, Scotch, gin, vodka, etc.

What would you suggest?

Douglas Collins

Hermosa Beach, California

Un dîner sans vin est comme un jour sans soleil.

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Really, any of those spirits should make a fine substitute for the brandy. Just think about the flavours of each, and decide what you want in the final product. If you want something a little sweet, go with the rum; if you want it a little smoky, go with the Scotch. If you were cooking game, I'd definitely recommend the gin, as I think juniper goes well with gamier meats.

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Beef and bourbon is a classic combination, and probably is what I'd use (although I'm seldom out of cognac or brandy :wub: ). Scotch should work fine, too, as my predecessors suggested. Vodka would be pretty much pointless, though.

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Beef and bourbon is a classic combination, and probably is what I'd use (although I'm seldom out of cognac or brandy  :wub: ). Scotch should work fine, too, as my predecessors suggested. Vodka would be pretty much pointless, though.

My thoughts, too. I went with Bourbon, or actually Jack Daniels. The only Bourbon in the house is A.H. Hirsch 16-Year-Old Reserve and the only Cognac is an unopened bottle of Remy Martin XO, both of which run about $5 a tablespoon these days, so I thought Jack was the wiser choice. Proved to be a good move -- I tasted the marinade and the booze is hardly evident with the mustard, garlic, and lemon.

Douglas Collins

Hermosa Beach, California

Un dîner sans vin est comme un jour sans soleil.

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There is a perceptable difference between Scotch, Cognac aka brandy or Bourbon. I have tried substituting Bourbon for Cognac as a cost cutting measure as Cognac prices increased over the years but it just wasn't the same. I acquired some good domestic brandy and that worked much better. So now the true XO is drunk and the cooking is domestic XO!-Dick

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Please don't confuse Jack Daniels whiskey with Kentucky Bourbon! They are very different products, besides bourbon can only be made in Kentucky just like Scott can only be made in Scotland. Even if you follow the same recipe and make and age it the same it can be called those names.

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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Please don't confuse Jack Daniels whiskey with Kentucky Bourbon!  They are very different products, besides bourbon can only be made in Kentucky just like Scott can only be made in Scotland.  Even if you follow the same recipe and make and age it the same it can be called those names.

Which is why I said "or actually Jack Daniels." But the flavor provides are roughly the same regardless of what it's called.

Douglas Collins

Hermosa Beach, California

Un dîner sans vin est comme un jour sans soleil.

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