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Alice Waters


mjc
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Well, without getting too far off topic, there's journalism and there's journalism. 60 Minutes is not a passive transmitter of Alice Waters and her project. I don't think they did Waters' project justice by casting it under a shadow of incredulity which is not the same thing as "asking the tough questions" and it's not constructive. On the other hand, I don't think Waters is the best spokesperson for the job: the mayor of San Francisco and Michelle Obama are better.

This is an important issue and one that many people in this economic climate might think isn't as immediately important as eGulleters do. This isn't on the radar for a lot of people who might otherwise be interested in it. There are tough questions to be asked about it, but that's not really what Stahl seemed to be interested in, so then what was the point of her segment? Why sandwich the Edible Schoolyard between shots of her buying expensive products and cooking breakfast in a hearth in her kitchen? She was content to sit back, let Waters cook her an egg, and then look askance at the whole thing. Both Stahl and Waters end up, in my opinion, casting it all in a bad light. Good thing Michelle Obama's there to do it justice.

nunc est bibendum...

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I was really intrigued by the egg in the spoon over a wood fire. I assume the egg was almost welded to that stainless spoon.

The spoon was somewhat larger than the ones she used in the 70's.

Tim

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I'd love to know how she got the egg off the spoon.

Isn't it ironic that growing one's own food has an "elitist" connotation to it? Not very long ago, only poor white trash grew their own food.

I think it would be fair to characterize Waters as a "purist" - rather than elitist.

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I believe the egg was floating in perhaps 1/2 cup of olive oil...more like poaching it in the oil over the fire.

The more important issue overall isn't necessarily getting people to buy "organic" and "local." How about instead of the 64 ounce bottle of coke, or the giant bag of chips, maybe they buy a bag of dried beans for $1 along with some vegetables and brown rice and learn how to feed your family properly. While the "edible schoolyard" may not be possible in many locations, I think teaching young kids about gardening, cooking and food in general can only have a positive, long term effect.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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And CKatCook said:

I am sorry, I thought that piece totally made Alice Waters look elitist. When she was standing front of the farmer that sold the grapes and said, something like just don't buy two pairs to addias. What went threw my mind was "tell that to a welfare mom" it was way unrealistic, between that and the fireplace in the kitchen..her message was lost.

I happen to live in a neighborhood where lots of people use food stamps. Many have nice looking sneakers, and you know what a lot are buying with their food stamps - trust me, it doesn't come from the produce department; it's giant bottles of Coke, it's cookies, it's chips, it's spareribs and it's assorted other crap. So, while beautiful Star Farms organic produce, or $4 a pound grapes may not be attainable, a little education might go a long way.

Edited by CKatCook (log)

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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  • 9 months later...

You are correct, it's not, and I'm not saying she shouldn't ask the tough questions. That's not what bothered me. There already is a compromise position, she just chose not to show it. Everything - her tone, questions, voice over commentary, and the editing - made the idea of eating well sound ridiculous. She left out a million things you might mention about slow food, sustainability, farmers, the environment and locavorism.

To me, its funny that you complained about the editing becuase I've read and heard unedited Alice Waters interviews, and Alice comes across much worse than the 60 minutes interview. But, what ended up happening was that sympathatic journalists would end up editing the interviews so Alice wouldn't come across that badly.

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  • 1 month later...

You are correct, it's not, and I'm not saying she shouldn't ask the tough questions. That's not what bothered me. There already is a compromise position, she just chose not to show it. Everything - her tone, questions, voice over commentary, and the editing - made the idea of eating well sound ridiculous. She left out a million things you might mention about slow food, sustainability, farmers, the environment and locavorism.

To me, its funny that you complained about the editing becuase I've read and heard unedited Alice Waters interviews, and Alice comes across much worse than the 60 minutes interview. But, what ended up happening was that sympathatic journalists would end up editing the interviews so Alice wouldn't come across that badly.

Fact: Every plant used in modern agriculture weather it be organic, local, GMO or not relies on Phosphoric Rock. It is essential to maintaining a stable DNA code in order for these farmed products to grow.

Fact: there are less than 10 mines around the world that contain this and since it is a basic element, it can only be recreated by using a particle accellerator such as the Large Hadron Collider. So when AW claims we need to go local and organic, what do we do when we run out of phosphorus? Unless she is sitting on some new technology that no other multibillion dollar corporation or individual has, I would argue she needs to take some lessons in food science.

It seems going local and organic is only part of the solution. I am all for it, but neat straight rows of vegetables, grains and fruit do not occur in the natural world.

Fact: in this video: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4867019n&tag=related;photovideo

she clearly points out that she has "an open hearth fireplace" yes that would be wood burning, why don't we just light a match underneath planet earth and suck it dry of one of the most important resources that is arguably more important than fossil fuels!

Fact: she has consistently slammed food science driven chefs without merit or investigation - soon the tables will turn. Let the games begin!

Want to know the answer? Watch Future Food, can also be followed here:

http://planetgreen.discovery.com/videos/future-food-gastronomic-geniuses.html

And most importantly until the show airs watch the videos on http://disruptivefood.com

Edited by inventolux (log)

Future Food - our new television show airing 3/30 @ 9pm cst:

http://planetgreen.discovery.com/tv/future-food/

Hope you enjoy the show! Homaro Cantu

Chef/Owner of Moto Restaurant

www.motorestaurant.com

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