Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Madhur Jaffrey- recommendations?


Recommended Posts

Why just one? :blink:

It really depends on what type of cuisine interests you (or the person you're buying a gift for): Indian food, vegetarian food, Asian food? And do you prefer recipes with a lot of travelogue and personal anecdotes, or more straightforward?

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

Link to post
Share on other sites

It gets confusing because her publishers have tended to adjust the title when re-publishing.

And her works have been re-published rather a lot!

Assuming that we are talking strictly Indian here, because that is her native specialism AND what she first became known for...

I think the original (BBC) "Indian Cookery" - which I believe has been recently republished as Mahdur Jaffrey's Curries - has a whole lot more than curries and was what rightly established her reputation. Start there, I'd suggest.

Alternatively, A Taste of India is divided into regional sections, and should enable you to achieve the appropriate look of disdain whenever anyone tries to generalise about 'Indian' cuisine - which Indian cuisine, pray tell?

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the original (BBC) "Indian Cookery" - which I believe has been recently republished as Mahdur Jaffrey's Curries -

Are you sure? Because she also has a "Curry Bible" featuring recipes for "curry" from all over the world.

I have Indian Cookery and the Curry bible and they are very different books.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the original (BBC) "Indian Cookery" - which I believe has been recently republished as Mahdur Jaffrey's Curries -

Are you sure? Because she also has a "Curry Bible" featuring recipes for "curry" from all over the world.

Have checked and now certain.

1982 "Indian Cookery"

1994 "Illustrated Indian Cookery"

2008 "Curries" - published by BBC Books/Ebury (Random House) ISBN 978 1 846 07549 http://www.theasiancookshop.co.uk/madhur-j...book-3780-p.asp

Which according to the flyleaf has the same recipe collection as the earlier pair.

At least three different titles in the UK alone.

BTW, don't get the idea that the 1982 original lacked photo illustrations. It didn't - its just that the writing was the main thing.

And there was also a 2002 republishing of "Illustrated" - with different illustrations - and dropping the word "Illustrated" from the title... http://www.eburypublishing.co.uk/viewbook....txt=&searchopt= -- which seems to be the 'Indian Cooking' available from Amazon US in a 2003 US edition which (despite the identical cover illustration) doubtless differs from the UK 2002 original in more ways than the subtle change of title!

It seems to be that the 2002 edition is what has been re-launched in 2008 as "Curries" (with the different ISBN). The photographs in Curries are ©2002 and ©1994

To repeat "Curries" is a wretched title for a book that goes far deeper than that preconception!

Anyway, whichever version, this is the book that originally established her.

And these titles have nothing to do with "The Curry Bible" -- or her "The Ultimate Curry Bible".

There's yet another title called "Curries and Kebabs" though ...

I did START by saying that it was confusing, didn't I? :cool:

Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the original (BBC) "Indian Cookery" - which I believe has been recently republished as Mahdur Jaffrey's Curries -

Are you sure? Because she also has a "Curry Bible" featuring recipes for "curry" from all over the world.

I have Indian Cookery and the Curry bible and they are very different books.

That's exactly the point I am making. Looks like dougal has done plenty of research though!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Why just one?  :blink:

Well, you see, as I have a housemate who has essentially threatened to rend the flesh from my bones if I add more cookbooks to our already-voluminous collection (not that she doesn't appreciate them, it's a question of storage space), I have to be really-eally-picky as to what I add

It really depends on what type of cuisine interests you (or the person you're buying a gift for):  Indian food, vegetarian food, Asian food? And do you prefer recipes with a lot of travelogue and personal anecdotes, or more straightforward?

I'm looking for Indian, and I don't mind fluff as long as its fluff-with-content- I like having more in-depth info on the cuisines I study.

Sincerely,

Dante

Edited by Dante (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
It gets confusing because her publishers have tended to adjust the title when re-publishing.

And her works have been re-published rather a lot!

Assuming that we are talking strictly Indian here, because that is her native specialism AND what she first became known for...

I think the original (BBC) "Indian Cookery" - which I believe has been recently republished as Mahdur Jaffrey's Curries - has a whole lot more than curries and was what rightly established her reputation. Start there, I'd suggest.

Alternatively, A Taste of India is divided into regional sections, and should enable you to achieve the appropriate look of disdain whenever anyone tries to generalise about 'Indian' cuisine - which Indian cuisine, pray tell?

lovely! I'm a great fan of learning regional cuisines, and I'll confess to occasionally taking pleasure in having the ability to give looks of disdain (tho I only occasionally actually give such looks- it's more about the ability to do so for me. ;) )

Now I want both of those.

Maybe I can volunteer t build a new bookshelf in the kitchen when/if we get around to remodeling it...

Sincerely,

Dante

Link to post
Share on other sites
You could get "The Essential Madhur Jaffrey" for a taster, and then get her other books as your intereste develops.

Thanx! I'll check that one out too.

Hmmm...maybe I'll see if I can get one or more through Inter-library loan and scope them out first before committing to buy one (or more).

Sincerely,

Dante

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 years later...

Bump! I am looking at buying a book from Madhur Jaffrey, but don't know where to start. She has published several books since this thread in 2009. Any suggestions out there?

 

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
    • By mixmaster b
      I am interested in getting some cookbooks that cover the basics of pastry and baking--not bread, necessarily, but dessert, cakes, cookies, etc. I searched a few other cookbook threads but did not have luck on finding books on pastry.
      My interest is in fairly classic French and European style baking, and I need a book that covers technique. Pictures would also be much appreciated--I like both the step by step pix or great pictures of the end product.
      Right now, I have Desserts and Chocolate Desserts by Pierre Herme. (I love these and have had good results from the recipes, but feel I should start with a more classic approach.) La Varenne Pratique has provided some good starting points, but I would like to find a book with more focus on baking.
      I was thinking about the Payard book. Any comments? Suggestions would be much appreciated! In case it applies, I am a home cook and am slightly more skilled than a total beginner.
      Thanks!
    • By liuzhou
      Congratulations are due to Fuchsia Dunlop, whose "Food of Sichuan" has just been published in a Chinese language version - a rare honour here. I've ordered a couple of copies as gifts for local friends who loved the Engish version, but struggled with some language issues.
       

      《川菜》,
      中信出版社。
       
       
    • By Brooke Dojny
      Fried Clams (From the New England Clamshack Cookbook)
      Serves 4 as Appetizer.
      Reprinted with permission from The New England Clamshack Cookbook by Brooke Dojny, 2003

      Vegetable Oil or solid white shortening for frying, such as Crisco
      2-1/2 pt shucked, medium-sized whole-belly soft-shell clams
      1-1/2 c evaporated milk
      1-1/2 c yellow corn flour
      3/4 c pastry flour, cake flour or all-purpose flour
      tartar sauce
      lemon wedges

      1. Heat the oil or shortening over medium heat in a deep fryer or heavy, deep pot until it reaches 350 degrees F.
      2. Rinse the clams gently if they are muddy, and dry on paper towels.
      3. Pour the evaporated milk into a large bowl. In another large bowl, stir together the corn flour and pastry flour.
      4. Using your hands, drip about one third of the clams into the milk, letting the excess liquid drain off. Dredge the clams in the flour mixture, using your hands to make sure each clam is evenly coated. Transfer to a colander or large strainer and shake gently to remove the excess flour.
      5. Slide the clams into the hot fat and deep-fry until golden brown, 2 to 4 minutes, depending on the size of the clams. (Cooked clams can be kept warm in a slow oven while you finish the remaining frying.)
      6. Serve with tartar sauce and lemon wedges.
      Keywords: Seafood, Appetizer, American
      ( RG468 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...