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Any Ideas for Disco Sparkles?


onetoughcookie
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I'm in love with the look of these. I want to use then for jeweled cookies, but am mildly worried.

Does anyone have any experience with them? I ate a test cookie in front of the mirror.

The only telltale sign is a little glitter on the face, fingers, etc. Better than oversaturated

black royal, right?

Any comments will be appreciated.

Thanks, EGulleters.

www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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I wasn't sure if a shot of jagermeister was just the standard unit of unpleasantness around here.  :)

Honestly?... It's a thing that looks particularly unappealing in a food/dessert. I wouldn't feel compelled to put it in my mouth, or even to pick it up, especially knowing how glitter tends to hang around here and there which is pretty irritating.

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Uh-oh.....I just did a bunch of them for a little girl's birthday party!

:biggrin: Uhoh.... I'm sure they'll love them. But that's a good distinction too. It's one thing to offer that sort of thing to kids, who will probably delight in everything about them, including the staying power of the glitter, and a whole nother ballgame with adults.... Or anyway, I think so.... I could be wrong.

But for a little girl's birthday party? I'm thinking raging success.

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Uh-oh.....I just did a bunch of them for a little girl's birthday party!

:biggrin: Uhoh.... I'm sure they'll love them. But that's a good distinction too. It's one thing to offer that sort of thing to kids, who will probably delight in everything about them, including the staying power of the glitter, and a whole nother ballgame with adults.... Or anyway, I think so.... I could be wrong.

But for a little girl's birthday party? I'm thinking raging success.

I should have said these were for a child to begin with...sorry. But, thank you for your honesty.

I truly was looking for an honest opinion.

They're going to be cupcake toppers. Now I'll be curious as to what the birthday girl says, and, what the mom says!!

www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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The problem is, it looks a little TOO much like real glitter, and real glitter just isn't something you would want to eat.

Also, in the picture at least, it looks really metallic - like iron filings or something like that. It's interesting in a novelty sort of way, but anyone who's accidentally chewed a bit of tinfoil knows a mouth full of metal is an unpleasant prospect indeed.

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It's non-toxic, not exactly edible. Sold as decor, it's not food, but it won't kill yah. I mean I love edible glitter--it's not as shocking as disco dust but does glitter it up some, made of gum arabic if memory serves.

I would not put it on my products that will be eaten but on flowers or decor yes.

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It's non-toxic, not exactly edible. Sold as decor, it's not food, but it won't kill yah. I mean I love edible glitter--it's not as shocking as disco dust but does glitter it up some, made of gum arabic if memory serves.

I would not put it on my products that will be eaten but on flowers or decor yes.

Hi K8,

I use edible glitter as 'snow' for winter projects. It 'melts' when it hits anything wet, so it cannot

be applied to wet royal.

This disco dust has no mouth feel whatsoever, no taste either. I ate my test cookie a week ago, and I'm still here, so we know it won't kill...immediately (LOL!)

I actually saw this used by a British cake and cookie maker in a recent book of hers, and I flipped for the look of it. This discussion reminds me that in Europe, the dragees are edible...silver coloring over sugar...they're meant to be eaten. Not so here, as we all are warned time and time again.

I'm hoping the 'tween birthday girl and her little pals will love this look. I'll know the verdict on Sunday after the party is over.

Do you use luster dust on anything that's meant to be eaten? And if so, do you just dust or

paint on with a flavorless/odorless alcohol or lemon extract?

www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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Yes edible glitter does dissolve hence the edibleness of it. I bet royal breaks down if it gets a brush of piping gel (so the sutff could adhere). But I can do eglitter on top of swiss meringue buttercream without noticeable dissolving. Does the edible glitter work with royal that's half set up?

Yes I use the non-toxic luster and pearl dusts with whatever alcohol is on hand, everclear, lemon extract, vanilla, vodka, whatever. If it's too loose wait a few minutes and the liquid will evaporate, if it dries out just add more alcohol. It can be stored as is and re-used and re-used.

So say I've finished putting all those logos on a Louis V purse cake for example so then I apply dry pearl dust to the dry surface of the fondant -- then chill the cake. The moisture generated by the cake coming back out to room temp works to advantage with the dust.

And there is a steaming that often takes place with gum paste flowers to adhere the dusts. Just hold the dried flower into a steam mist for a brief few seconds and the dust deepens slightly and glimmers. (Over hot water or steam iron)

How's about rolled buttercream or rolled fondant for your great cookies.

Rolled buttercream makes incredible tasting cookies.

I have a really touchy tummy and I bet if I ate disco dust it would not bother me. But I worry about using it for edible items for sale meself.

You are creating art but it's also food.

Well dragees are ok everywhere but California pretty sure.

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Crystal colors are something new that I haven't tried yet but they come highly recommended by cake buddies. FDA approved matte flower dust. I don't see their pearl dust, but I'm told there is one. So if that's true you can mix these colors with pearl dust to make luster dust. Edited by K8memphis (log)
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Two years ago my daughter turned 40 and had a disco party. I made mini cupcakes for her with assorted colors of the disco dust sprinkled on them. Everyone loved them and they didn't make anyone ill.

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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How's about rolled buttercream or rolled fondant for your great cookies.

Rolled buttercream makes incredible tasting cookies.

Rolled buttercream? As in meringue buttercream? You chill it, roll it, cut it out and put it on top of the cookie, or how does that work?

As for the glitter...it does look fun, but probably has limited applications. I'd eat it at least once. I've used luster dust on chocolates and some cookies, nice for holidays or in a mix of less sparkly things, but best when not overdone.

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Pastrygirl, rolled buttercream is equal parts corn syrup and shortening, some flavoring then add enough powdered sugar to make a doughy, rolling consistency.

You can roll it out and texture it and cut it out with the same cookie cutter you cut your cookies out with. Put the cookies in the oven, put the rolled buttercream in the freezer. When the cookies come out and are hot, place the frozen rolled buttercream cut out on there~~viola.

Would take edible glitter very well.

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Yes edible glitter does dissolve hence the edibleness of it. I bet royal breaks down if it gets a brush of piping gel (so the sutff could adhere). But I can do eglitter on top of swiss meringue buttercream without noticeable dissolving. Does the edible glitter work with royal that's half set up?

Yes I use the non-toxic luster and pearl dusts with whatever alcohol is on hand, everclear, lemon extract, vanilla, vodka, whatever. If it's too loose wait a few minutes and the liquid will evaporate, if it dries out just add more alcohol. It can be stored as is and re-used and re-used.

So say I've finished putting all those logos on a Louis V purse cake for example so then I apply dry pearl dust to the dry surface of the fondant -- then chill the cake. The moisture generated by the cake coming back out to room temp works to advantage with the dust.

And there is a steaming that often takes place with gum paste flowers to adhere the dusts. Just hold the dried flower into a steam mist for a brief few seconds and the dust deepens slightly and glimmers. (Over hot water or steam iron)

How's about rolled buttercream or rolled fondant for your great cookies.

Rolled buttercream makes incredible tasting cookies.

I have a really touchy tummy and I bet if I ate disco dust it would not bother me. But I worry about using it for edible items for sale meself.

You are creating art but it's also food.

Well dragees are ok everywhere but California pretty sure.

Rolled buttercream? I know I've heard of it, but would you mind refreshing my memory as to what that is?

Fondant is gorgeous, but so much of what I do is for kids, and we know how kids are about fondant.

www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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Pastrygirl, rolled buttercream is equal parts corn syrup and shortening, some flavoring then add enough powdered sugar to make a doughy, rolling consistency.

You can roll it out and texture it and cut it out with the same cookie cutter you cut your cookies out with. Put the cookies in the oven, put the rolled buttercream in the freezer. When the cookies come out and are hot, place the frozen rolled buttercream cut out on there~~viola.

Would take edible glitter very well.

Whoops! :wub: Didn't see this. Does rolled b/c get hard like royal? Can it be molded like gumpaste?

www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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Pastrygirl, rolled buttercream is equal parts corn syrup and shortening, some flavoring then add enough powdered sugar to make a doughy, rolling consistency.

You can roll it out and texture it and cut it out with the same cookie cutter you cut your cookies out with. Put the cookies in the oven, put the rolled buttercream in the freezer. When the cookies come out and are hot, place the frozen rolled buttercream cut out on there~~viola.

Would take edible glitter very well.

Whoops! :wub: Didn't see this. Does rolled b/c get hard like royal? Can it be molded like gumpaste?

Doesn't get hard like royal--but will hold texture. Y'know it's kind of on the order of the lofthouse cookies with the thick icing. Try it--I know you will want to incorporate it in some way. It's a soft bite too--really great for cookies. Modeling with it? I don't think so, not as is, but there are so many great modeling doughs.

Beautiful cuppies!

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How's about rolled buttercream or rolled fondant for your great cookies.

Rolled buttercream makes incredible tasting cookies.

I've never heard of rolled buttercream either. Could it substitute for fondant?

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How's about rolled buttercream or rolled fondant for your great cookies.

Rolled buttercream makes incredible tasting cookies.

I've never heard of rolled buttercream either. Could it substitute for fondant?

Not so much but maybe. I have an old booklet somewhere that advises to use this as a cake covering but I can't find the book and obviously it did not catch on. Works good an a flat surface like a cookie.

I freeze it to handle it. It's just corn syrup, fat and sugar.

I don't know anyone who uses it n place of fondant as a cake covering and I know tons of decorators. There's nothing to keep it from tearing from it's own weight.

Edited by K8memphis (log)
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The husband and wife team, the Winbecklers, use rolled buttercream and were pretty good with it, as I recall. He used to make the news on occasion by sculpting celebrities out of cake (I remember the Princess Diana one.) and used this rolled buttercream.

I've never used it so I can't say whether it tastes good or not; if you do a google search on rolled buttercream cookies, there's a nice picture of some autumn leaves with it. It looked like fondant on the cookie to me, so maybe there's another alternative out there for decorating cookies. Personally, I use coating "chocolate" for decorating cookies.

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