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Paillete Feuilletine


chefpeon
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But now what do I do with it?

Any tips and recipes and suggestions for use would be deeply and greatly appreciated!

:wub:

P.S. and if you can phonetically spell out how to pronounce it, that earns you bonus points! :laugh:

Edited by chefpeon (log)
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It's great mixed with chocolate but not with cream as it will get soggy. Lots of possibilities. I think there are several threads about Feuilletine.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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It's great mixed with chocolate but not with cream as it will get soggy. Lots of possibilities. I think there are several threads about Feuilletine.

I saw the thread about homemade feuilletine......couldn't find much else. I know I can't mix it with moisture based items like buttercream, mousseline, pastry cream, etc, and have it maintain it's crunch. Is it basically just something you add to chocolate and that's it? Can you use it as a garnish, like to mask the sides of cakes? I'd like to be able to make a crunchy dessert with it.

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There was a baking competition on the Food Network last night and someone used it as one of the layers in an entremet, but they didn't explain what it was mixed with - it looked like just a crispy layer

I would have pronounced it pie - et fay uh teen. The first syllable is somewhere between pay and pie and Feuille is between fay and foy

Edited by rickster (log)
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It's great mixed with chocolate but not with cream as it will get soggy. Lots of possibilities. I think there are several threads about Feuilletine.

I saw the thread about homemade feuilletine......couldn't find much else. I know I can't mix it with moisture based items like buttercream, mousseline, pastry cream, etc, and have it maintain it's crunch. Is it basically just something you add to chocolate and that's it? Can you use it as a garnish, like to mask the sides of cakes? I'd like to be able to make a crunchy dessert with it.

Do a Google search: feuilletine site:egullet.org

I stopped looking after more than 8 threads - there's even a recipe that uses it in RecipeGullet.

One thing we did in a chocolate class was to mix it with hazelnut gianduja (and/or praline) and milk chocolate, roll it out between parchments, then cut out small circles which were then used as a base for dipped chocolates.

If you use it to garnish a cake, I think it would depend on the on the frosting, but doing it just before serving might be best. And I think it'd be delicious and crunchy.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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There was a baking competition on the Food Network last night and someone used it as one of the layers in an entremet, but they didn't explain what it was mixed with - it looked like just a crispy layer

I would have pronounced it pie - et fay uh teen. The first syllable is somewhere between pay and pie and Feuille is between fay and foy

I love it! You gave me the first good laugh of the day. :biggrin: Thanks.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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It's great mixed with chocolate but not with cream as it will get soggy. Lots of possibilities. I think there are several threads about Feuilletine.

Can you use it as a garnish, like to mask the sides of cakes? I'd like to be able to make a crunchy dessert with it.

Do a Google search: feuilletine site:egullet.org

I stopped looking after more than 8 threads - there's even a recipe that uses it in RecipeGullet.

One thing we did in a chocolate class was to mix it with hazelnut gianduja (and/or praline) and milk chocolate, roll it out between parchments, then cut out small circles which were then used as a base for dipped chocolates.

If you use it to garnish a cake, I think it would depend on the on the frosting, but doing it just before serving might be best. And I think it'd be delicious and crunchy.

Would this work? Spread chocolate on a strip of acetate, then sprinkle the feuilletine on the choc before it sets, then use the strip on the outside of the cake or entremet.

The other thing I thought of is the hazelnut "cream" I've seen at Swiss Chalet or AUI. You can melt it like you would a poured fondant, to pour on the top of a finished cake, then put the feuilletine on top of that. It should stay crunchy and you might even be able to put a chocolate drizzle on it....

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It's great mixed with chocolate but not with cream as it will get soggy. Lots of possibilities. I think there are several threads about Feuilletine.

Can you use it as a garnish, like to mask the sides of cakes? I'd like to be able to make a crunchy dessert with it.

Do a Google search: feuilletine site:egullet.org

I stopped looking after more than 8 threads - there's even a recipe that uses it in RecipeGullet.

One thing we did in a chocolate class was to mix it with hazelnut gianduja (and/or praline) and milk chocolate, roll it out between parchments, then cut out small circles which were then used as a base for dipped chocolates.

If you use it to garnish a cake, I think it would depend on the on the frosting, but doing it just before serving might be best. And I think it'd be delicious and crunchy.

Would this work? Spread chocolate on a strip of acetate, then sprinkle the feuilletine on the choc before it sets, then use the strip on the outside of the cake or entremet.

...

I think the acetate would be on the wrong side...

Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I think the acetate would be on the wrong side...

You press the chocolate side to the cake and peel off the acetate, as if you were applying a chocolate band, or you could break off pieces from the acetate and apply them to the cake....

Yeah, but the chocolate side is the side the acetate is on.

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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I think the acetate would be on the wrong side...

You press the chocolate side to the cake and peel off the acetate, as if you were applying a chocolate band, or you could break off pieces from the acetate and apply them to the cake....

Yeah, but the chocolate side is the side the acetate is on.

You're right! There's two sides, one with the feuilletine on it, and the other side with just chocolate. I should have said the side with the feuilletine on it.

I don't know whether it is possible to separate the sheet from the chocolate before applying it to the cake. I know when making small chocolate decorations you can separate it, but when it is a wide band, I don't know if this is possible.

Thanks for catching the error :smile:

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I think the acetate would be on the wrong side...

You press the chocolate side to the cake and peel off the acetate, as if you were applying a chocolate band, or you could break off pieces from the acetate and apply them to the cake....

Yeah, but the chocolate side is the side the acetate is on.

You're right! There's two sides, one with the feuilletine on it, and the other side with just chocolate. I should have said the side with the feuilletine on it.

I don't know whether it is possible to separate the sheet from the chocolate before applying it to the cake. I know when making small chocolate decorations you can separate it, but when it is a wide band, I don't know if this is possible.

Thanks for catching the error :smile:

With the cake bands and chocolate - you apply the band while the chocolate is wet and peel it off once the chocolate is set. Letting it harden then applying it won't allow you to get it around the cake.

The pieces would still work very nicely though applied like tiles on the cake and would solve the problem of the acetate-chocolate-feuilletine sandwich.

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