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Ok I think it is just about time to get some good Creme Brulee recipes from everyone. What is everyone's favorite style of Creme Brulee? Any certain techniques? I just started reviewing my creme brulee recipe again and wanted to see what types everyone likes and what flavors they like.

Have a great day,

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I use Jacques Pepin's recipe in "Julia & Jacques Cooking at Home".

It is the perfect balance of egg and cream, infused with orange. It is delicious, simple and classic.

I brulee with a torch that I purchased at a local hardware store. It has a strong flame and makes a crust in seconds. The small torch that I purchased in the kitchen store was useless.

To me this is one of the best desserts to have at a dinner party. It takes a very few minutes to prepare and can be done ahead - with the exception of the brulee. Also, it looks elegant and it is not too sticky sweet after a big meal. I often serve it with a small delicate nut based cookie.

Life is short, eat dessert first

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Roland Mesnier has two versions in his Dessert University cookbook - one is an orange and the other is a champagne version. My copy is at work and I am home right at the moment, but I think if you do a search on "champagne creme brulee" it might come up on an amazon site and you can view the recipe from the book online.

it is very much like a pastry cream - you cook milk, a thickener like cornstarch and sugar, temper some beaten egg yolks with the hot milk, then back on the heat, then into a mixer to cool on low speed, then you add butter. It's creamy and pourable and you can put it into tartlet shells or ramekins, then sugar and torch when ready.

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I've heard a few people recently say that the best Creme Brulee they have ever made was a coconut creme brulee...Anyone tried this?

I did wip out a Milk Chocolate Creme Brulee yesterday...It turned out pretty good but I think only certain people would like it. Have you guys tried a milk chocolate creme brulee before?

How do you post pictures on here by the way???

Have a great day!

Edited by aguynamedrobert (log)
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I tried the coconut caramel panna cotta (no eggs, so doesn't qualify as creme brulee) from the epicurious site. I didn't use the caramel, it was definitely more of a molded flan or creme renversee. It has a nice smooth texture, nice coconut flavor but as always, I wish there was more coconut flavor. It used coconut milk and cream of coconut. I might use a coconut rum caramel sauce the next time I make it.

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I like using the Duby's recipe for warm creme brulee sometimes. It's a stovetop version and it does contain all of the traditional elements but has been adjusted to allow for the addition of a little white chocolate plus a bit of agar and gelatin so it will set and hold at room temp or slightly warmer. It's open to flavor variations just as the traditional version is. It's not a replacement for the original but it's a good addition to the team.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I've been baking creme brulee for an Arabic restaurant lately and have infused my standard recipe with either cardamom or saffron. I'm not a fan of cardamom, but the saffron creme brulee is fabulous! I infuse the flavor into the warmed cream for about 30 minutes, then prepare the brulee, as usual.

Beaches Pastry

May your celebrations be sweet!

Beaches Pastry Blog

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Ok I think it is just about time to get some good Creme Brulee recipes from everyone.  What is everyone's favorite style of Creme Brulee? Any certain techniques? I just started reviewing my creme brulee recipe again and wanted to see what types everyone likes and what flavors they like.

Have a great day,

I really do like a good, "plain" Creme Brulee.

For recipes, I consulted a few sources and found that many used the same ratio of cream to egg yolk. 1 yolk (USDA large) + 1/3 cup heavy == one reasonably sized portion. Of course, there is a bit of sugar in there, too. I find that this ratio scales well. If I have a cup of cream and some eggs, I can make 3 and have it turn out just as well as making 8 servings.

My method is to use some vanilla bean in the cream. Bring up to a bare simmer. Then off heat. Allow to cool. When it's cool, whisk in sugar with yolks. Pout in cream. I don't bother to temper because by this time, the cream is barely warm. Into little glass Pyrex custard cups. Into a water bath. 275 degree oven for about 15 minutes. I check them then. If they need more time, they get it.

Remove. cool. top with turbinado sugar. Torch. back in fridge. let it cool more so any hot custard sets up again. (not a restaurant technique, but works OK in the home).

Good stuff.

I actually make them fairly often. Discovering the ratio was key. I can make three one day. Eat one that day. Have one the next day, one the day after that. Seems to keep just fine. (I don't brulee until shortly before eating) A dessert that a lot of people that would think of as being fancy can be an "everyday" dessert.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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I'll put anything in creme brulee...chocolate, spices, tea, flowers, bacon...ok so the bacon was a bit OTT. For coconut, you can either infuse toasted coconut or use coconut milk in place of the liquid, or both. For milk chocolate, decrease the cream and increase the milk a little so you have the same fat proportion overall, maybe a little less sugar b/c milk chocolate is so sweet. Custards ares so versatile, any flavor that can be hot or cold infused is fair game. I've also infused ripe pear w/ skin then strained it out - the possibilities are endless.

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I'm partial to the creme brulee I had at some restaurant that I can no longer recall that had some sort of apricot compote hiding under the custard: really delicious.

Over in the France: Cooking and Baking forum we have an excellent topic on the various techniques recommended for preparing the classic style. Much of the advice there probably also applies to the various "modern" variations.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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White chocolate with Grand Marnier,

That sounds phenomenal... I don't suppose you have a recipe handy?

I definately do!

Here you go:

2L 35% cream

1/2-2/3 Cup sugar depending on sweet you like it

20 egg yolks

2tsp vanilla extract

500gm white chocolate

4oz Grand Marnier

Heat cream just until boiling, pour over chocolate and stir till melted

Temper eggs with cream mixture

add other ingredients, strain through chinois

bake in convection oven @300 covered with a sheet pan approx. 30-40 min. depending on size of ramekin used

They are done when they have that "shake"- they will finish setting up while you let them cool in the water bath on the counter

Cool overnight in fridge

Brulee them and enjoy! :biggrin:

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