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Vanilla Cake Batter


sugarseattle
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We've switched to scooping our cupcakes daily and don't have time to make our batters daily. We also want the flexibility to be able to scoop any number so not just 12/24/etc. and make cupcakes quickly on the fly (not having to start from scratch if we run out). Our oil based cupcakes are living well in the fridge for 3-5 days, but we're having trouble with our butter ones. I don't like oil based vanilla cakes.

The other thing that is cool is that if we have a surplus of batter say if cupcakes were slow, we can just bake off layers and store them in the freezer. What's happening with the vanilla cake is it gets these little funnels like a very open sponge and is very hard like rubber, literally)

Our current vanilla cake is made with the high ratio method (dry ingreds+sugar+ butter to wet crumb, then liquid) The batter is a little wet, but I think that's why it makes good cupcakes.

I am thinking a cream butter sugar method might yield better success? Our coffee cake batter uses this method and it stays at least 5 days in the fridge.

What do you guys think?

Stephanie Crocker

Sugar Bakery + Cafe

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Why not bake off cupcakes and cake layers and freeze them? That way you preserve the integrity of a freshly mixed product. I HAVE to do that, especially because most of my cakes are chiffon. I can't save chiffon batter, since it can't sit....it has to go right in the oven.

There is nothing wrong with freezing stuff. If I couldn't rely on my freezers, I couldn't be in business. Refrigerating cakes and cupcakes does dry them out a bit, but freezing does not if they are wrapped well and not frozen for a long long time. :wink:

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we used to freeze our cupcakes and found the quality was not as good as freshly baked. we do freeze our layers, but find that the quality is not so ill affected since we brush them with syrup when constructing the cakes, and this is not possible with cupcakes.

Stephanie Crocker

Sugar Bakery + Cafe

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I've never run into a white cake batter that doesn't deteriorate as it sits.....I'm a believer in baking off fresh batter and freezing as opposed to bucketing up batter and baking off as needed.

Either way, you look at slight deterioration no matter which way you go. I guess it's all a matter of what you personally think is worse......."old batter" or "frozen cake".

Of course we'd all love to fresh bake everything to order, but that just isn't possible in this business.

I do have a cocoa cake batter that is WONDERFUL to bucket up and save.....but I've never found the same for white butter cake.

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Do you mind sharing your cocoa cake formula? I have been having some trouble with my chocolate cake lately and have been experimenting on different formulas. The recipe I have right now is good for cake layers, but not so good for cupcakes, a little dry for cupcakes, in my opinion.

Thanks!

Why not bake off cupcakes and cake layers and freeze them?  That way you preserve the integrity of a freshly mixed product. I HAVE to do that, especially because most of my cakes are chiffon. I can't save chiffon batter, since it can't sit....it has to go right in the oven.

There is nothing wrong with freezing stuff. If I couldn't rely on my freezers, I couldn't be in business. Refrigerating cakes and cupcakes does dry them out a bit, but freezing does not if they are wrapped well and not frozen for a long long time. :wink:

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