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Pancake Seasonings


Johan Sjöberg
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First of all, this is my first post here, so hi, everyone. I'm Johan, a university student from Sweden. I'm in my first year of the Bachelor's programme in molecular biology at Lund University. I try to eat as healthy as possible, so I avoid using a lot of sugar, butter and stuff in my recipes. Well, that's that, I guess.

Anyway, I'd like to try some new and interesting ways to season pancakes. This is my basic pancake recipe (makes two 7-inch diameter pancakes):

• 1 dL (0.4 cup) graham flour

• 1 dL (0.4 cup) oat milk (I'm lactose intolerant)

• 1 whole egg

• 1 tsp baking powder

So far, I've tried adding curry, blueberries, and gingerbread spices (cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and ginger). The gingerbread ones are the best so far, but I'm eager to try other variants. If you have any nice ideas, please share!

Edited by Johan Sjöberg (log)

"He who has a mind to eat a great deal, must eat but little; eating little makes life long, and, living long, he must eat much."

—Luigi Cornaro, Discourse on the Sober Life

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There's a great pancake topic around here somewhere, loaded with ideas. This will probably get mixed in with that one, but I'll reply here anyway.

With that blend, I bet bananas would be excellent. mashed bananas in the mix, or diced up and on top. Or coconut. Or grated citrus rinds, or even a combination of all three. Walnuts sound like they would be good in that, too, or pecans, or other nuts. Of course, the first thing I thought was "Nutella" but it doesn't sound like what you're looking for :) But then, Nutella is the first thing that pops into my mind for a lot of things.

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Thanks, Lilija. Bananas sound great - I could mix them together with the milk and eggs in a blender, and then add the flour and baking powder. Nutella sounds tasty, but it has a lot of sugar - too much for me, but YMMV. It also contains lactose, so I think my stomach would react badly to it.

"He who has a mind to eat a great deal, must eat but little; eating little makes life long, and, living long, he must eat much."

—Luigi Cornaro, Discourse on the Sober Life

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Peeled, chopped apples or drained, stewed apples would be good. Sort of like an apple pie pancake.

Did you like the blueberry addition? If so, try cranberries or some other tart berry.

Here's the pancake thread- The pancake topic to end all pancake topics

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Hard-cheese like parmesan might be OK for you. I love cheese in and on my pancakes. With parmesan I would cook one side, then when I lifted the pancake to flip it, I'd sprinkle the parmesan on the pan, so it would make a nice crust on the other side.

Sliced apples are really good, too.

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Blueberry pancakes were good, although the pancakes had a very interesting blue-grey color. I'll see what other kinds of frozen berries I can find.

Maybe I could bake the pancake in the oven and add apple slices on top?

"He who has a mind to eat a great deal, must eat but little; eating little makes life long, and, living long, he must eat much."

—Luigi Cornaro, Discourse on the Sober Life

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King Arthur Flour's Whole Grain Cookbook has a stunning pancake recipe that uses muslei in the mix.

Dan

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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I don't know if you can have any cheeses like swiss, Jarlsberg, cheddar, or similar that can be sliced? I don't use baking powder in mine, just eggs, flour, and milk. Pour a ladle full in the pan, take a slice or two of cheese and dredge through the wet dough in the pan, flip over and lay it in, making sure it's completely covered with liquid dough. Eventually flip the thing and you end up with a pancake with melted cheese filling, very very tasty! Make some fresh tomato sauce to fold in, just onion, garlic, tomatoes (fresh in summer, canned in winter), some parsley and basil, salt, sugar, red pepper if you like). Put pancake on plate, ladle in some sauce on one half, fold over. Sprinkle with more cheese if you like, enjoy! Hmmm, haven't made that in a while, I think I'll put it on this weeks dinner list!

Of course, an other delicious thing with pancakes is Nutella or simply some very good honey.

Or you can mix some diced salami and parsley into the batter (and some diced cheese if you like) for an other treat.

You can probably tell that I lost my sweet tooth with my baby teeth..... :-)

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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I love making pancakes using blue cornmeal - it adds a unique texture and taste that forms the basis for lots of different flavor combinations. One I really like is blue corn blueberry pancakes with lemon curd topping (or, if you've got a foamer, a honey-lavender foam).

Also of note: blue corn and banana or blue corn and cottage cheese, or for a more savory combination, blue corn pancakes topped with cotija cheese or goat cheese.

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