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pierre45

Jadis (Paris 15e) and Goumard (Paris 1e)

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JADIS is a small 12 table hole in the wall, in an area of the 15th that's becoming the equivalent of New york's E village.Its a block away from Afaria and close to Le grand Pan.

The chef Guillaume Delage left P. gagnaire's Gaya rive gauche to open Jadis.

His cooking is sophisticated and somewhat creative.The result is mouth watering.

I started with the truffled risotto.The rice was el dente and covered with a layer of thick truffle shaving.It was fantastic.My main was grilled lotte fish over a bed of lentil in jaune wine sauce.One of the best fish dish i ever have had.Dessert was tarte aux citrons et mangues.Very refreshing.The total cost was 55 euros.This place will be very difficult to get in the future.My next table neighbors were all from the 7th.

GOUMARD

This is a Paris establishment over 100 years old.It has a 1 star Michelin rating.The restaurant had been going through rough times.

Recently a new chef took it over and instituted a 49 euro dinner consisting of 3 courses,1/2 bottle wine and 1/4 bottle water and coffee.

The place is plush and attractive,wonderful for valentine day.

The appetizer consisted of st jacque in butter sauce,deliceous, and the main, high grade bass fish in a casserole cooked with various vegetables.It was not bad ,but somewhat neutral in flavor,reminiscent of spa food.The wine was a refreshing and decent pays d'oc white wine.The pineapple dessert was outstanding.Overall dinner at those prices in such surrounding is excellent value

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I agree about Jadis. I had the same truffled risotto there last month which was great. I could not believe the amount of truffle in the dish. I had scallops but my firend had fish which was wonderful.

JADIS is a small 12 table hole in the wall, in an area of the 15th that's becoming the equivalent of New york's  E village.Its a block away from Afaria and close to Le grand Pan.

The chef Guillaume Delage left P. gagnaire's Gaya rive gauche to open Jadis.

His cooking is sophisticated and somewhat creative.The result is mouth watering.

I started with  the truffled risotto.The rice was el dente and covered with a layer of thick truffle shaving.It was fantastic.My main was grilled lotte fish over a bed of lentil in jaune wine sauce.One of the best fish dish i ever have had.Dessert was tarte aux citrons et mangues.Very refreshing.The total cost was 55 euros.This place will be very difficult to get  in the future.My next table neighbors were all from the 7th.

GAUMARD.

This is a Paris establishment over 100 years old.It has a 1 star Michelin rating.The restaurant had been going through rough times.

Recently a new chef took it over and instituted a 49 euro dinner consisting of 3 courses,1/2 bottle wine and 1/4 bottle water and coffee.

The place is plush and attractive,wonderful for valentine day.

The appetizer consisted of st jacque in butter sauce,deliceous, and the main, high grade bass fish in a casserole cooked with various vegetables.It was not bad ,but somewhat neutral in flavor,reminiscent of spa food.The wine was a refreshing and decent pays d'oc  white wine.The pineapple dessert was outstanding.Overall dinner at those prices in such surrounding is excellent value

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How thick is a thick layer of truffles in a 55€ menu? Not Rostang thick I suspect...


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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His cooking is sophisticated and somewhat creative.The result is mouth watering.

I ate at Jadis on a Saturday night just before Christmas. It was OK, with some potential, but at the moment it is the sort of restaurant I would visit if it was around the corner not in the depths of the 15eme.

I started with a rabbit pate en croute which was quite good although quite a thin slice, my partner had a mushroom and snail vol-a-vont which was a good size and she really enjoyed. For mains I had the blanquet of veal served in the Jadis way - a plate of boiled vegetables with the veal and sauce on the side. A good depth of flavour in the veal, but with really boring vegetables - reminded me of school dinners. My partner had trout on a bed of green mashed potatoes (cresson?) which was OK.

Desserts were the real low point, I had a riz-au-lait which had a very sweet coulis on the top - reminiscent of a pre-made rice dessert from the supermarket. My partner had a radical ile flottante which was like a green muffin in custard - weird. I think he needs a pastry chef.

Service was perfunctory, we seemed to be the only tourists in a packed restaurant that turned the tables once, probably 40+ covers. The bill was €94 including an €18 burgundy (they had run out of the Givry and it was OK) and Evian.

I used to love Guillaume's food at Gaya which used to be our local when we lived in Paris. Were my expectations too high? Or maybe we hit too early in its evolution, or bracketed it with some unfair competition (Spring and Le Cinq the previous days). In fact our lunch at Le Comptoir the next days was far better and more enjoyable.

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His cooking is sophisticated and somewhat creative.The result is mouth watering.

I ate at Jadis on a Saturday night just before Christmas. It was OK, with some potential, but at the moment it is the sort of restaurant I would visit if it was around the corner not in the depths of the 15eme.

I started with a rabbit pate en croute which was quite good although quite a thin slice, my partner had a mushroom and snail vol-a-vont which was a good size and she really enjoyed. For mains I had the blanquet of veal served in the Jadis way - a plate of boiled vegetables with the veal and sauce on the side. A good depth of flavour in the veal, but with really boring vegetables - reminded me of school dinners. My partner had trout on a bed of green mashed potatoes (cresson?) which was OK.

Desserts were the real low point, I had a riz-au-lait which had a very sweet coulis on the top - reminiscent of a pre-made rice dessert from the supermarket. My partner had a radical ile flottante which was like a green muffin in custard - weird. I think he needs a pastry chef.

Service was perfunctory, we seemed to be the only tourists in a packed restaurant that turned the tables once, probably 40+ covers. The bill was €94 including an €18 burgundy (they had run out of the Givry and it was OK) and Evian.

I used to love Guillaume's food at Gaya which used to be our local when we lived in Paris. Were my expectations too high? Or maybe we hit too early in its evolution, or bracketed it with some unfair competition (Spring and Le Cinq the previous days). In fact our lunch at Le Comptoir the next days was far better and more enjoyable.

Phil-That is an interesting report since you knew his cooking from Gaya and had those expectations. Our two starters were the vol-a-vont and the truffled rissoto and I can not see improving those combo of choices without some three star magic. We both had excellent fish but it did not blow us away. I agree the desserts were the weak point of the meal. But for less than 100 Euros for two I was pretty happy.

And I am jealous. I wish I had Spring and LeCinq to "cloud" my judgement

Fresh--We had five large pieces of truffle in the dish. They were bigger than a quarter and not quiet as large as a half dollar. They also were about as thick as one of those coins. I never have see such a generous amount, especially for 18 euros.

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I ate at Jadis on a Saturday night just before Christmas. It was OK, with some potential, but at the moment it is the sort of restaurant I would visit if it was around the corner not in the depths of the 15eme....

I used to love Guillaume's food at Gaya which used to be our local when we lived in Paris. Were my expectations too high? Or maybe we hit too early in its evolution, or bracketed it with some unfair competition (Spring and Le Cinq the previous days)....

Perhaps the biggest measure of your displeasure is the fact that you found Spring, in the middle of the 9th, an easy address from your home which we gather was near Gaya in the 7th, while Jadis is a 10 minute ride on the 39 bus or the metro.

eGullet member #80.

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FYI:

Jadis

208, rue de la Croix-Nivert 75015 Paris

01 45 57 73 20

Métro 12 Convention, Métro 12 Porte de Versailles


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Perhaps the biggest measure of your displeasure is the fact that you found Spring, in the middle of the 9th, an easy address from your home which we gather was near Gaya in the 7th, while Jadis is a 10 minute ride on the 39 bus or the metro.

Margaret - you misinterpreted what I said. If Jadis was just around the corner, fine. But it isn't. It wasn't worth the journey even if it had only been 10 mins on a bus or metro. Door to door it was approx 30 mins - it is quite a walk from Convention metro.

OK, Spring isn't around the corner either, but it is worth the trip as it is a far, far superior restaurant. For what is is worth both restaurants are approx 9 metro stops from where I lived on line 12.


Edited by PhilD (log)

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[OK, Spring isn't around the corner either, but it is worth the trip as it is a far, far superior restaurant. For what is is worth both restaurants are approx 9 metro stops from where I lived on line 12.

Phil,disregarding transportation issues,as you know eating is subjective.The fun is trying different ones and having a wonderful experience in the process.

Jadis ,when i went was really very enjoyable.When i go next time ,who knows.

Actually ,as I went solo. they placed me in a hidden corner,so I kept refering to them that i was the one in Siberia

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[OK, Spring isn't around the corner either, but it is worth the trip as it is a far, far superior restaurant. For what is is worth both restaurants are approx 9 metro stops from where I lived on line 12.

Phil,disregarding transportation issues,as you know eating is subjective.The fun is trying different ones and having a wonderful experience in the process.

Jadis ,when i went was really very enjoyable.When i go next time ,who knows.

Actually ,as I went solo. they placed me in a hidden corner,so I kept refering to them that i was the one in Siberia

Pierre - I agree, and I also think it is dangerous to judge a restaurant on only one visit. Restaurants are subjective, we have different tastes, we visit restaurants in different moods, and we all have different backgrounds that shape our expectations. If I still lived in Paris I may have gone back to Jadis again.

However, both my wife and I were underwhelmed given the advance publicity - it was quite a disappointment as we had really looked forward to it and had booked it far in advance based on the great early reviews.

I don't understand why anyone thinks I had a transport "issue". I was simply trying to put the restaurant into context, If I lived around the corner I would be happy to go on a regular basis. It simply wasn't special enough to make trip.

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I was simply trying to put the restaurant into context, If I lived around the corner I would be happy to go on a regular basis. It simply wasn't special enough to make trip.

Besides the differentiation between "decent in the immediate neighborhood" and "worth travelling across town" is the judgement of whether a restaurant is worth a visitor's precious time, i.e., one evening out of a visit.

eGullet member #80.

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I was simply trying to put the restaurant into context, If I lived around the corner I would be happy to go on a regular basis. It simply wasn't special enough to make trip.

Besides the differentiation between "decent in the immediate neighborhood" and "worth travelling across town" is the judgement of whether a restaurant is worth a visitor's precious time, i.e., one evening out of a visit.

If you had three days then no, but if you have three weeks then yes.

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Yesterday on a busy saturday night, i revisited Jasis.They instituted 2 seatings on the week end, and we were warned about it.

We were surrounded by locals including a couple who had driven 2 hrs to get there .It seems the place is becoming famous.

We started with coquillages cooked with vegetables and covered with a crust.

It was mildly flavored but interesting. The main course was epaule d'agneau cooked with beans,olives, and and sun dried tomatoes. It was huge and quite tasty.It reminded me of a cassoulet but lighter. Dessert was Paris -Brest and a chocolat souffle.

The cuisine was a modern version of traditional French, portions were not small and beautifully presented. Also, there was no intent to contrast flavors or textures and no foreign spices. So, this restaurant as attested by allthe diners in the is truly French.

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I loved my meal at Jadis. But seeing at a destination restaurant is a mistake. The guy just cooks. I did not find him "inventive" or "creative". he's just doing good food. My menu, I think, says it all -- oeuf cocotte, rognons and cheese.

I strongly recommend the place for very good food at very nice price. But not as destination. I can't think of many bistrots that I would recommend as destination dining, actually. CAJ maybe.

I also started practicing with my new photo gear: http://picasaweb.google.fr/ZeJulot/Jadis#

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I loved my meal at Jadis. But seeing at a destination restaurant is a mistake. The guy just cooks. I did not find him "inventive" or "creative". he's just doing good food. My menu, I think, says it all -- oeuf cocotte, rognons and cheese.

I strongly recommend the place for very good food at very nice price. But not as destination. I can't think of many bistrots that I would recommend as destination dining, actually. CAJ maybe.

I also started practicing with my new photo gear: http://picasaweb.google.fr/ZeJulot/Jadis#

I've heard on the grapevine that a few people are upset that folks like Pierre45 and I have liked Jadis and touted it. They have found, like you, that it's not "inventive" or "creative" and I'd agree.

As we'll all recall, the guy premised the place on cooking ancient recipes with contemporary products and eqpt., he never promised "inventive" or "creative" cuisine. Criticizing it for not being "inventive" or "creative" is like criticizing a bistrot for not serving oysters, choucroute and beer or a noodle place for not serving sushi.

It is what it is, just as Les Symples..... or Le Soufflé are.

As for "destination" places, perhaps we need to start a topic on the subject, because I'd agree they're rare.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I agree. Maybe also this is the tiny little part of the truth in the old NYT controversy about Spain taking over France. It seems that Spain, but moreover those days, Denmark and Germany, are the places where stuff unheard of happens, exciting new things that sophisticated diners will jump on a plane just to taste and be "in". Meanwhile, back at the farm (meaning in France), all we have to offer is the best (and the less good too, alas) of our view of food as part of culture, not fashion.

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I agree. Maybe also this is the tiny little part of the truth in the old NYT controversy about Spain taking over France. It seems that Spain, but moreover those days, Denmark and Germany, are the places where stuff unheard of happens, exciting new things that sophisticated diners will jump on a plane just to taste and be "in". Meanwhile, back at the farm (meaning in France), all we have to offer is the best (and the less good too, alas) of our view of food as part of culture, not fashion.

I just returned from a little more than a week in Paris, and I couldn't agree more. Although I originally hoped to seek out more "destination" restaurants that were innovative and creative, for personal and logistical reasons we ended up eating more casually and more ad-hoc: we only made one reservation our entire trip. We stayed mostly with traditional bistro-style mid-range (20-40 Euros pp?) dining which was prepared with obvious care, was deeply soulful, and was good value. Our experience in eating in this manner and at this price point was we received more consistently satisfying meals than if we were to do similarly in New York, the town I'm most familiar with. Particular standouts for me were lunch at L’Ecailler du Bistrot and a dinner at A La Biche Au Bois.

On the negative side, I found myself missing New York's rich low-price ethnic dining options, particularly for Asian food. I can't understand why a city like Paris would not have better Vietnamese options, but what we sampled around Belleville was mediocre. Speaking now strictly from value, New York seems like a better deal on the low-end and high-end of dining, but Paris really shone for us in that mid-range.

Sorry if this post got quite off topic...


---

al wang

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You're right. One of the wrongest ideas about France is that average, everyday food is good. That would be Italy, maybe, but not France. French gastronomy and good food is fundamentally associated with the idea of privilege. So the standard low price options are just not good, and you need to be very picky there. Actually, you need to be very picky everywhere, hence the guides and the blogs... We have excellent Vietnamese restaurants, but they're not the norm.

For high end though, I don't think I agree with you because in my experience, NY high end does not really compete with the best France has to offer. I agree that mid-range in France can be quite good, but I think that the best value is actually found in fine dining, especially at lunch.

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I agree. Maybe also this is the tiny little part of the truth in the old NYT controversy about Spain taking over France. It seems that Spain, but moreover those days, Denmark and Germany, are the places where stuff unheard of happens, exciting new things that sophisticated diners will jump on a plane just to taste and be "in". Meanwhile, back at the farm (meaning in France), all we have to offer is the best (and the less good too, alas) of our view of food as part of culture, not fashion.

In Paris right now and I couldn't agree with you more. Yes, I miss certain places that I went to 35 years ago and many that have disappeared over all the ensuing years that I have eaten here. However, so what. Paris still remains the quintessential food city, with so many restaurateurs (and traiteurs, in the broadest sense) who, for the most part, are not jaded and who really care about (a precis of what you said) " to offer .. the best ... of our view of food as part of culture, not fashion." May it always remain this way.

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I agree. Maybe also this is the tiny little part of the truth in the old NYT controversy about Spain taking over France. It seems that Spain, but moreover those days, Denmark and Germany, are the places where stuff unheard of happens, exciting new things that sophisticated diners will jump on a plane just to taste and be "in". Meanwhile, back at the farm (meaning in France), all we have to offer is the best (and the less good too, alas) of our view of food as part of culture, not fashion.

. Paris still remains the quintessential food city, with so many restaurateurs (and traiteurs, in the broadest sense) who, for the most part, are not jaded and who really care about (a precis of what you said) " to offer .. the best ... of our view of food as part of culture, not fashion." May it always remain this way.

Amen

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I went to Jadis during a 1 week trip to Paris this week and the recommendation of some on here as well as David Lobovitz whose Paris recommendations I had taken with me.

The place was packed when I arrived at 8pm and was completely fully half an hour later. service was good though I found quite quick.

I had the 5 dish degustation menu (45 euro) which began with my personal favorite dish was the apple ravioli. It came with a sauce though unfortunately I didn't note what I was told was in it and I couldn't quite place it well enough though it was delicious had a small kick to it and a pepperyness. The apple ravioli was the start of the dish though, cooked perfectly and providing a lovely freshness.

Then I had the Scallops cooked 2 ways in a bleurre blanc sauce. This was a flavorsome and smooth dish.

The main course was quite an unusual mix for French restaurant of chinese noddles with peas and peppers with a spanish wine sauce giving a kind of cross between a spanish and asian flavour but then on top of it is a saddle of rabbit. Was good but quite an unusual mix.

2 desert plates which were both served at the same time, first was the rice pudding which came served in a jar with a big wooden spoon while the plate held the pineapple and pomegranate. The rice pudding I believe had coconut milk in it and this made a lovely combination with the tropical fruit. A little like a Thai dessert of sticky coconut rice with fruit that I enjoy.

The second desert was a small cake with lemon curd, lemon jelly and lemon Ice Cream. A refreshing end.

--

I thought the place was very nice and had a very popular local bistro atmosphere. It didn't blow me away but I did find it worth the trip which personally I didn't find that far though I guess if you live there and you don't live in that direction you might find it a trek. I walked to Eiffel Tower afterwards and didn't find it that far.

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ITs interesting to note that The new york times in a recent article found Jadis as an excellent value restaurant

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Are you sure that was the Paris place?

Not to say it wasn't good value but I did notice there was a restaurant in New York called Jadis where as this thread is regarding a restaurant in New York.

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From April 18, 2010 NYT:

JADIS

For the last year, the bargain-hungry have traveled several Métro stops (and a long walk) past the Eiffel Tower to the 15th Arrondissement, following fawning reviews for Guillaume Delage’s food at Jadis, a fine deal at 25 euros for lunch and 32 for dinner.

What does it say about the state of the world that a friend who dined there last fall reported seeing an American publishing magnate at one table and a Goldman Sachs honcho at another? That the food is that good.

Jadis looks unassuming enough, with cafe tables and retro posters. The menu, too, speaks bistro. Mr. Delage, 30, may have cooked with Michel Bras and Pierre Gagnaire, but he wants to reassure people who might not normally venture to a gastronomic restaurant. Once their order comes in, he gets to tweak the classics respectfully. (“We detour things,” he said at the Omnivore Food Festival in Deauville in February.)

Hence, a lunchtime appetizer of rich crab mousse found the traditional pink disc quietly updated by its bed of julienned watermelon radish. Next, a bowl of jus-braised leeks and salsify was set in front of me, brown on brown on soft. “Merci, but I ordered the ... ” Just then, a narrow rectangular plate bearing classic, perfectly executed skate — brown butter, lemon, capers, a dash of piment d’Espelette chili — was placed alongside my fork. Deconstruction? Whatever. It worked, on every level.

I was delighted with the lightest dessert, a citrus “minestrone” — stained-glass sections of fruit and candied kumquat enriched with tiny peaks of lemony pastry cream and a curving orange-flower marshmallow. As I was paying, Mr. Delage began putting away napkins he’d been folding. Small is beautiful.

Jadis, 208, rue de la Croix Nivert; (33-1) 45-57-73-20; www.bistrot-jadis.com. Lunch, 25 euros; dinner, 32 euros.

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