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simple syrup and moist cake


toni
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Hi, I'm not sure about when to use a simple syrup to make the cake moist before frosting. I made a chocolate cake and put the layers in zip lock bags 2 nights ago and put them in the refrigerator until I could frost today. My questions are: Is it okay to put baked cake layers into the refrig? I had read different ideas and could not remember much. Hopefully it will not pull moisture out of the cake. My idea was to have the cake cold when I frosted. Once, I used a simple syrup on a chiffon cake but do not know when it is appropriate or not. Do you baste a syrup of 1/2 sugar and 1/2 water on regular cake made of flour, buttermilk, butter and eggs? In this case, there was also chocolate. Will that help it be moist ? How long do you wait to frost after putting on a syrup if using a syrup is appropriate? I looked in some cookbooks and did not get any help on these matters and I so appreciate any help. Thanks in advance.

Edited by toni (log)
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I put it on most all my cakes. I usually apply it when I torte and fill. You can do it basically any time you want for any cake you want.

Did you put any flavor in there? That's another optional option.

Vanilla, rum, GrandMarnier, Kaluha, amaretto or almond extract--the lorann oils etc. etc. or plain is ok too.

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I put it on most all my cakes. I usually apply it when I torte and fill. You can do it basically any time you want for any cake you want.

Did you put any flavor in there? That's another optional option.

Vanilla, rum, GrandMarnier, Kaluha, amaretto or almond extract--the lorann oils etc. etc. or plain is ok too.

Thank you, K8memphis, for the reply. I once made a syrup that was only 1/2 sugar, 1/2 water. I'm interested in your idea, too, of adding a flavor. My frosting and filling will be a chocolate/choc. malt with cream cheese and whipping cream. What would you suggest as a flavor component to the syrup and if you would, tell me how you make your syrup and how much flavor you'd add. Thank you so much, again. Just how much syrup do you put on a cake layer and do you baste it on?

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So for quarter cup each of water and sugar I'd use about a scant quarter cup of liqueur give or take--I just taste it to see if I like it. And that's about how much I'd use for one recipe or cake mix.

All of the flavors I listed I think would go good with your cake. Grand Marnier is my default splash--raspberry or cherry flavor brandy or vodka or regular fruit flavor.

It's the tenth picture in this thread. That shows about how much I use and the kind of squirt bottle. I mean some people brush it on.

You wanna be careful to not let your cake get a hot alcohol spot.

Some flavor splash ideas for you.

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I'd like to add that it all depends on your cake (whether you syrup it or not).

I syrup my genoise and sponge and chiffon cakes, but my chocolate cake I do not. It's already moist and sweet enough as it is. Syrup would be overkill. If your cake is fine on it's own, don't overly sweeten and moisten the layer if it doesn't need it!

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So for quarter cup each of water and sugar I'd use about a scant quarter cup of liqueur give or take--I just taste it to see if I like it. And that's about how much I'd use for one recipe or cake mix.

All of the flavors I listed I think would go good with your cake. Grand Marnier is my default splash--raspberry or cherry flavor brandy or vodka or regular fruit flavor.

It's the tenth picture in this thread. That shows about how much I use and the kind of squirt bottle. I mean some people brush it on.

You wanna be careful to not let your cake get a hot alcohol spot.

Some flavor splash ideas for you.

You are too kind! Thank you for the information, and I absolutely loved the thread you referred me to. I am such a visual learner. Your wedding cake was fantastic and I commend you for your patience and talent. Thank you for sharing such helpful ideas, K8memphis.

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I'd like to add that it all depends on your cake (whether you syrup it or not).

I syrup my genoise and sponge and chiffon cakes, but my chocolate cake I do not. It's already moist and sweet enough as it is. Syrup would be overkill. If your cake is fine on it's own, don't overly sweeten and moisten the layer if it doesn't need it!

Thank you for adding your thoughts. That helps me a lot, and I appreciate it.

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So for quarter cup each of water and sugar I'd use about a scant quarter cup of liqueur give or take--I just taste it to see if I like it. And that's about how much I'd use for one recipe or cake mix.

All of the flavors I listed I think would go good with your cake. Grand Marnier is my default splash--raspberry or cherry flavor brandy or vodka or regular fruit flavor.

It's the tenth picture in this thread. That shows about how much I use and the kind of squirt bottle. I mean some people brush it on.

You wanna be careful to not let your cake get a hot alcohol spot.

Some flavor splash ideas for you.

On another note, K8memphis, I have been looking for a good plastic wrap for keeping cake layers fresh before putting in the frig or freezer. I noticed in your pictorial a box on your counter called Polyvinyl Films, I think. Is that the one you use before setting your naked layers in ziplock type bags? And where do you purchase it? Is it large enough to wrap 9 or 10 inch rounds cake layers? I made a cake this weekend and the wrap did not cover the cake well, but I put it in ziplocks too. I think you once said the plastic wrap should be stretched tight around the cake. The cake was easy to frost after setting in the refrigerator. Do you know how long cake layers can be put this way in the frig. because I don't want them to dry out. Is it best to put them in the freezer if it is longer than one or two days? Thank you for any thoughts on keeping the cake moist and fresh.

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I just bought the kind of plastic wrap that Sam's or Costco had. It's the short commercial box with a ton of wrap in it. But I use a lot of wrap on cakes. I wrap it snug but not too tight. I double wrap them generally then stick them into those reynolds cooking bags that are made for cooking turkeys & roasts. I tape two together if my cake is too big.

I don't use zip locks because they might squosh the cake. I'm careful not to squish--I wrap it snug though --less area to develop ice crystals is my hope.

But I mean I use two lengths of plastic wrap to wrap the cake once because that wrap was not wide enough to cover all the way. Then it just overlaps in the middle. do that two times then into the bag so some of it is covered four times. You can't be too careful with it I think.

In a perfect world I go straight to the freezer with my filled cakes then all I have to do is ice them.

The frige is contorversial--it is said that the cakes dry more in the frige. However, I think that cakes made with butter do not relax enough when brought back to room temp so a nice moist cake will develop a 'hey this isn't melting in my mouth any more and it's scratchy down my throat' feel to it.

So the cakes I freeze (wedding cakes that is) have to be made with those multi million dollar ingredients that can create such a stir on foodie boards.

I like to 'season' my cakes at least over night in the freezer. When they thaw they reconstitute the moisture levels kwim. I avoid the frige as much as possible with cake.

So that's how I do it. Freezing thoughts for you...hmm that was chilly. :raz:

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I just bought the kind of plastic wrap that Sam's or Costco had. It's the short commercial box with a ton of wrap in it. But I use a lot of wrap on cakes. I wrap it snug but not too tight. I double wrap them generally then stick them into those reynolds cooking bags that are made for cooking turkeys & roasts. I tape two together if my cake is too big.

I don't use zip locks because they might squosh the cake. I'm careful not to squish--I wrap it snug though --less area to develop ice crystals is my hope.

But I mean I use two lengths of plastic wrap to wrap the cake once because that wrap was not wide enough to cover all the way. Then it just overlaps in the middle. do that two times then into the bag so some of it is covered four times. You can't be too careful with it I think.

In a perfect world I go straight to the freezer with my filled cakes then all I have to do is ice them.

The frige is contorversial--it is said that the cakes dry more in the frige. However, I think that cakes made with butter do not relax enough when brought back to room temp so a nice moist cake will develop a 'hey this isn't melting in my mouth any more and it's scratchy down my throat' feel to it.

So the cakes I freeze (wedding cakes that is) have to be made with those multi million dollar ingredients that can create such a stir on foodie boards.

I like to 'season' my cakes at least over night in the freezer. When they thaw they reconstitute the moisture levels kwim. I avoid the frige as much as possible with cake.

So that's how I do it. Freezing thoughts for you...hmm that was chilly.  :raz:

That is so helpful. I think I am dense: I'm not sure what this sentence means: "So the cakes I freeze...have to be made with those multi-million dollar ingredients that can create such a stir on foodie boards." If you have time, I'd love to know if you mean something like shortening and you were being funny about multi-million dollar and the foodie boards. Sorry. Thank you again for all the help. :biggrin:

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That is so helpful.  I think I am dense:  I'm not sure what this sentence means: "So the cakes I freeze...have to be made with those multi-million dollar ingredients that can create such a stir on foodie boards."  If you have time, I'd love to know if you mean something like shortening and you were being funny about multi-million dollar and the foodie boards.  Sorry.  Thank you again for all the help.  :biggrin:

No no I was being a bit obtuse--I am referencing that bastard child of baking, the cake mix.

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That is so helpful.  I think I am dense:  I'm not sure what this sentence means: "So the cakes I freeze...have to be made with those multi-million dollar ingredients that can create such a stir on foodie boards."  If you have time, I'd love to know if you mean something like shortening and you were being funny about multi-million dollar and the foodie boards.  Sorry.  Thank you again for all the help.  :biggrin:

No no I was being a bit obtuse--I am referencing that bastard child of baking, the cake mix.

I love your sense of humor! Thank you.

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