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Bacon Gougeres


snowangel
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So, the former long-hair (aka Peter) has requested these for Super Bowl Sunday.

Suggestions for add-ins besides bacon?

Or, add-ins instead of bacon!

ETA: How well do these freeze for a couple of days, or do they hold well without freezing?

Edited by snowangel (log)
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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They're just a savory choux pastry with cheese, and there are tons of choux recipes around. As for the items themselves, Ruth Reichl's gougeres recipe is in RecipeGullet. Click here for it!

Gougeres don't keep, sadly.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Judy Rodgers adds arugula and pickled onions to the bacon in the Zuni Cafe Cookbook:

http://www.leitesculinaria.com/recipes/coo...k/gougeres.html

These are delicious, but bacon-y gougeres are a little too heavy for me.

Jerry Traunfeld in the Herb Farm cookbook combines cheddar and freshly chopped thyme in his gougeres recipe. The ingredients in this post are the same as Traunfeld's recipe; the instructions have been rewritten. I prefer to reduce the amt of thyme to 3/4 TB. A little of this fresh herb goes a long way for my tastebuds.

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f7/ch...eres-15906.html

Alice Waters, in the Art of Simple Food, suggests substituting 2 or 3 chopped salt-packed anchovies for the cheese in gougeres. Hmmm, maybe not for a Superbowl party. I'd eat this version, but for others it might be an acquired taste.

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ETA:  How well do these freeze for a couple of days, or do they hold well without freezing?

Regrettably, the other posts are correct. After being baked they really don't hold at all. I would say optimally they only stay delicious for a few hours. However, if you're concerned about prep time you can always make and shape the dough as if ready to bake and put it in the freezer.

I had worked for a french cafe for awhile and we would keep pans of frozen choux dough mixed with herbes de provence and bring them out when needed. There are a couple of things to note if doing this that I had discovered.

-They have to come directly from the freezer to the oven-- no thawing.

-I found that it helped if you use an egg wash to not only help with the sheen but it seemed to keep them from drying out which appeared to help with the rise. A pan of water sitting at the bottom of your oven isn't a bad idea either.

-When they were almost ready to come out of the oven and were not at risk of collapsing, we would bring them out and grate comte cheese on top.

The choux dough itself contained no cheese- we found that after freezing it made the choux too heavy to rise.

They were quite scrumptious.

I highly recommend the egullet discussion on pate choux. It really helped to bring my choux 'A game' to work. I would link to it, if I knew how :wacko: . Help?

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ETA:  How well do these freeze for a couple of days, or do they hold well without freezing?

I had worked for a french cafe for awhile and we would keep pans of frozen choux dough mixed with herbes de provence and bring them out when needed. There are a couple of things to note if doing this that I had discovered.

-They have to come directly from the freezer to the oven-- no thawing.

With regular (cheese-less) choux, I have piped, frozen, thawed, then baked successfully. What did you find happened when you thawed that makes you recommend going directly from the freezer to the oven?

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ETA:  How well do these freeze for a couple of days, or do they hold well without freezing?

I had worked for a french cafe for awhile and we would keep pans of frozen choux dough mixed with herbes de provence and bring them out when needed. There are a couple of things to note if doing this that I had discovered.

-They have to come directly from the freezer to the oven-- no thawing.

With regular (cheese-less) choux, I have piped, frozen, thawed, then baked successfully. What did you find happened when you thawed that makes you recommend going directly from the freezer to the oven?

I found that they would dry out, hence no rise. Of course, Arizona is quite a bit more arid then most other places :wink: .

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I know this is a little late for the super bowl, but a couple years ago for another super bowl party I made some blue cheese gougeres and filled them with a buffalo chicken mousse....they were delicious and the hit of the party....

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