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Seared Tuna


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My anniversery is coming up and I usually cook tuna for my wife. she really likes one of the dishes that I pulled off of epicurious but I want to try something different. Any tuna ideas out there?

How do you usually do the tuna? How different would you like it to be?

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My anniversery is coming up and I usually cook tuna for my wife. she really likes one of the dishes that I pulled off of epicurious but I want to try something different. Any tuna ideas out there?

If she likes tuna raw, there are a lot of choices.

1. Tuna poke serve with deep fried wonton skin.

2. Tuna carpaccio with arugula salad

3. Seared Tuna with lemon, caper butter source

If you need recipe go to web and there are tons of recipe for all of the above

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My anniversery is coming up and I usually cook tuna for my wife. she really likes one of the dishes that I pulled off of epicurious but I want to try something different. Any tuna ideas out there?

How do you usually do the tuna? How different would you like it to be?

Its a seared tuna in a wasabi sauce.

If I can go in a direction that isn't asian-ish that would be good. Most of the ways she has had tuna is with asian flavors. I like it but it kind of bores me know.

My skills are pretty good. :wink:

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Not my favorite, but you could poach it. Depending where you live, bbq is always an option too, or the broiler of course.

If you get really good fresh tuna, I'd not do too much to it, maybe a light sauce, but you want the fish to be able to sing by itself, it should not need an orchestra.

Some interesting rice (brown/wild/forbidden/etc) or maybe some fava beans with a light butter sauce, touch of garlic. Some nice waxy baby potatoes with butter.

With fish I try to stay on the light side, let the full flavor of the fish develop and shine, no heavy sauces.

Maybe a bit mustard powder, a bit of honey? Very light touch of sesame oil?

Hope that helps!

Oliver

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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One method I've used a few times recently is to mix up some wasabi powder to form a paste and then mix it with mayo. Slather up a block of ahi and roll in panko crumbs. Sear ligtly to just get some color on the panko on all sides with no more than an 1/8"-1/4" cooked crust and a raw center. I cooked a little too much on this one but it was still good.

gallery_6878_3484_21552.jpg

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If it is good tuna, I am not sure why you want to sear it...eat it raw!

Lately I have done Tuna Tartar 3 or 4 ways...the best and most simplistic is cubed tuna, really good olive oil, sea salt, pepper and a little squeeze of lemon.

Other takes on this are Tuna Tartar asian style, a little ginger/garlic/lemon grass/soy marinade

Etc...

Use your imagination, best cookbook ever!

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I like to roll a block of tuna in sesame seeds and carefully sear it off. More traditionally, you would use bonito, which holds up to this treatment well and stays moister than ahi when cooking. After searing the fish, let it cool a bit and then wrap in plastic wrap before slicing (if you don't wrap it, it's difficult to slice cleanly even with a sharp knife: the sesame seeds will form a crust). Serve with ponzu sauce.

Ponzu Sauce

- 3 tbsp fresh Lime juice

- 3 tbsp Soy Sauce

- 100g Daikon Radish (3 1/2 oz) grated

- 2 Long Green Onions chopped

Grate the daikon (it should look like applesauce). Add daikon directly to lime juice.

Add the soy and thinly chopped scallion.

Yummy. :wub:

Edited by Batard (log)

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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Haven't tried it myself - but I just read on Alinea at Home about the tna dish she just made. She didn't like the final texture of the dish, but said the flavors were amazing. If you are comfortable with playing around without a recipe, it may be something you can work with.

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