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Pierre Hermé's "Macarons"

108 posts in this topic

Amazon.ca had it back in stock a few weeks ago, but now it's selling for 60 CDN and with a long wait. That usually means that they are hoping to get some more but don't count on it. Hopefully a second printing will come out soon for those that haven't picked it up yet.

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Amazon.ca had it back in stock a few weeks ago, but now it's selling for 60 CDN and with a long wait.  That usually means that they are hoping to get some more but don't count on it.  Hopefully a second printing will come out soon for those that haven't picked it up yet.

The books ( livres) page on the Pierre Herme site doesn't have the 'Mac book pictured on it at the moment either.

The second printing idea makes sense, I was thinking maybe it might get a softcover release too.

That would be pretty happening.


2317/5000

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I want it but, since it's not likely to show up in English, I probably won't get it. Translating is a pain in the butt, I did quite a bit of it with Los Postres de El Bulli and don't like the thought of doing it again. I don't do macs often anyway, I'd mainly buy it to be inspired by his creations.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Its stupid. Do they not like money!


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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Well, I can kinda understand. They don't usually translate most english cookbooks into french/spanish/etc. either... which may suck for some people that don't read english. Would be nice to have it though.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I want it but, since it's not likely to show up in English, I probably won't get it. Translating is a pain in the butt, I did quite a bit of it with Los Postres de El Bulli and don't like the thought of doing it again. I don't do macs often anyway, I'd mainly buy it to be inspired by his creations.

Tri2Cook, translating Macaron is a *much* easier task than Los Postres. Macaron is pretty light (all being relative) and there's a lot of visual support.


-- lamington a.k.a. Duncan Markham

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - collaborative book reviews about all things food and wine

Syrup & Tang - candid commentary and flavourful fancies

"It's healthy. It's cake. It's chocolate cake."

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Well, I can kinda understand. They don't usually translate most english cookbooks into french/spanish/etc. either... which may suck for some people that don't read english. Would be nice to have it though.

Yes, I agree with lamington, the 'mac book is much easier to translate and once you understand the basics it's all there.

"Los Postres..." was much harder because in most (all?) free online translators Catalan Spanish isn't really supported.

For me, the flavor profiles and layout in "Macaron" impressed me so much that "PH10" kind of let me down.

edited to add...

PH's e-gourmandises side of his online presence still has "Macaron", at 29.90 euro to boot!


Edited by tan319 (log)

2317/5000

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Dumb question time~

I never ordered anything from another country (I live in the US) I would love to order this book and have no problems working to get a translation. How would you order this book, being from the US, would I just pay in dollars what the exchange rate would be? Would they charge my credit card the amount in dollars, taking care of the exchange rate difference themselves?

Thanks!


"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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You would just use your card and they will get it approved for the exchange amount.

No different then ordering from Amazon,

Good Luck!


2317/5000

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Looks like I waffled over this one for too long. I finally decided I want it and now I can't find it anywhere.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Looks like I waffled over this one for too long. I finally decided I want it and now I can't find it anywhere.

If you know someone in France - there is a used copy on Amazon.fr - quite reasonable - but they will only ship to an address in France.

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Thanks Kerry but I don't know anybody in France... unless Quebec counts. :raz::biggrin:


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Looks like I waffled over this one for too long. I finally decided I want it and now I can't find it anywhere.

Hey!! I just headed over to Amazon.ca and it's still there! (I hope they update their stock indicators, though.)


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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Looks like I waffled over this one for too long. I finally decided I want it and now I can't find it anywhere.

Hey!! I just headed over to Amazon.ca and it's still there! (I hope they update their stock indicators, though.)

Don't think it's in stock though.

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It sucks the way people start ramping up prices as soon as somethings looks like it's going out of print.

FWIW, I still think a soft cover version might show up.

This has been an immensely popular book.

I wonder if that used 28e one on Amazon.fr could be picked up if you ordered the pickup from Chronopost yourself?It looks like Fnac has a copy or more for 28e


2317/5000

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It sucks the way people start ramping up prices as soon as somethings looks like it's going out of print.

FWIW, I still think a soft cover version might show up.

This has been an immensely popular book.

I wonder if that used 28e one on Amazon.fr could be picked up if you ordered the pickup from Chronopost yourself?It looks like Fnac has a copy or more for 28e

I don't speak enough french to order from FNAC.

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I can get a copy for you in Japanese if you want. . .

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If you're still in a bind and you really want it, try calling Kitchen arts and Letters in New York and see if they still have stock (last I checked was March, and they did).


Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

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I can get a copy for you in Japanese if you want. . .

Thank you for the offer but I'll have a tough enough time with French (which is the main reason it took me so long to decide to get it), I wouldn't stand a chance with Japanese.

Jumanggy: I'll look into that, thanks!


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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It sucks the way people start ramping up prices as soon as somethings looks like it's going out of print.

FWIW, I still think a soft cover version might show up.

This has been an immensely popular book.

I wonder if that used 28e one on Amazon.fr could be picked up if you ordered the pickup from Chronopost yourself?It looks like Fnac has a copy or more for 28e

I don't speak enough french to order from FNAC.

FNAC should (?) have a page available to order in English.

Amazon.fr does.

The Kitchen Arts and Letters idea sounds best though.


2317/5000

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As the FNAC site lists the title as taking 4-8 days to despatch, I would assume they don't keep it in stock and just order it from a distributor. As the book appears to be out of print, it is very unlikely they would be able to obtain a copy for you.

I'm in Paris right now and haven't seen the book anywhere. The fact that PH's own website doesn't list the book for sale also indicates that it's probably a lost cause except where a shop has old stock.


-- lamington a.k.a. Duncan Markham

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - collaborative book reviews about all things food and wine

Syrup & Tang - candid commentary and flavourful fancies

"It's healthy. It's cake. It's chocolate cake."

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The book is back on the Pierre Hereme website. I tried ordering it today - we'll see what happens.

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Can't read a word of French ...

Just to endorse the voices here that touched on the point, many French cookbooks are highly accessible to English-readers for the same reason cookbooks of other languages are accessible: recipes use limited vocabularies. Also, anyone who speaks English already has some French vocabulary anyway, consciously or not (it was one of the major feeder languages into modern English) -- you can progress fast with the aid of a dictionary, and if you actually use the cookbook, new vocabulary tends to "stick" and stay with you.

I don't have this book, but found the point above to be true with many others I have in French, a language I otherwise know very little, as well as for other languages. The obstacle of cookbook language difference is smaller than it may seem if you haven't tried it.

By the way, I think macarons are popular around the San Francisco area, people post about them on food blogs and shops feature them. (Until reading this thread I didn't realize they were considered a rare or lost art.)

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They wrote me after I inquired. Here is the link:

http://www.pierreherme.com/e-gourmandises/...194316ph1502853

Unfortunately, no shipping to North America - they hope to change this. Not available at amazon.com or amazon.ca either.

I'm having a friend in London pick it up and mail the book to me.

I also asked about the PH10 book but they currently have no plans to reprint it.

Cheers!


"But you have no chocolate? My dear, how will you ever manage?"

-- Marquise d Sévigné

"If I knew you were comin' I'd've baked a cake, hired a band, goodness sake..."

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PH10 is out of print already???

'Mac is a fantastic book, hope you enjoy it!


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