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Preparing food- letting it sit out to warm


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I know that with meat, you should take it out of the fridge and let it sit out enough so the meat's temperature will be at room temp before you cook it. But, do you do that for other types of food? Eggs? Fish? When do you want to not let something sit out to warm it up, and cook it while its still cold?

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My husband and I just had that discussion this morning. He asked why I let the eggs sit out until they've warmed up just a bit. I do it when I'm frying them because I think a cold egg would have to cook longer and maybe over-cook. For baking, I think cold eggs are probably better.

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My husband and I just had that discussion this morning.  He asked why I let the eggs sit out until they've warmed up just a bit.  I do it when I'm frying them because I think a cold egg would have to cook longer and maybe over-cook.  For baking, I think cold eggs are probably better.

Funny, I thought I'd learned that eggs should be room temperature for baking (unless you're separating them--then it's much easier to do cold). I always warm up my eggs in a bowl of hot tap water before using them for baking. Maybe that's why my cakes flop (and I avoid reading the Pastry forum to avoid being reminded of my shame)?

Feast then thy heart, for what the heart has had, the hand of no heir shall ever hold.
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You are correct. Egg whites will whip to a higher volume when they are warm (the optimum temp slips my mind at the moment...). Secondly, you want the eggs and butter to be warm to help create a good emulsion. Do you want to know why your cookie batter looks like cottage cheese when you add eggs to the creamed butter and sugar? Most likely it is because your eggs and butter are fresh from the fridge.

3 cents... adjusted for higher food costs.

DAn

Edited by DanM (log)

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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