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Parasol's Po-boys


TAPrice
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I shudder to pass along anything featuring Guy Fieri, but this complete breakdown of how Parasol's makes its roast beef is worth it:

Video: Making Parasol's roast beef (FoodTV)

Did anyone else's heart fall when they saw the Kitchen Bouquet go into the gravy? I kind of felt the same way when I learned that Prejean's uses it in their dark roux gumbo. How much of that stuff do you think is used in this city?

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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Kitchen Bouquet?

Kitchen Bouqet

I should not hate that guy as much as I do, but god damn I hate him.

Oh, and I always assumed that Kitchen Bouqet included MSG in its ingredients. Apparently not. I'd like to think that the color in things like Prejean's gumbo or parasol's gravy come from dark roux, but I suppose that's just naive.

Edited by Robert Peyton (log)
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Train-car loads of Kitchen Bouquet are used in this city.  What's wrong with it?  Why does it make you shudder?  It's caramel coloring, mostly.

That Guy guy makes me shudder.

Kitchen Bouquet? Eh, I guess I'd to believe my gravies are brown from cooking and not food color.

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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We grew up thinking that Kitchen Bouquet was a necessary ingredient in gravy.  :laugh:  New Orleans cooking authority, Tom Fitzmorris, comments on the customary practice  here

Indeed. I can show you a shelf full of cookbooks that call for its use. Attitudes toward shortcut or "cheater" ingredients have changed dramatically in recent years. The gap between theory and practice is always a wide one, but if the end results are delicious, I'm not going to quibble (at least not too much). My sister's killer chicken, oyster, and andouille gumbo uses jarred roux and a hit of Kitchen Bouquet, and she could easily take first prize in a cookoff. If no one told you about either shortcut product, I can promise you woudn't know.

Has KB been in use long enough to be considered a traditional ingredient? At what point does a little "helper" become a sin? Are certain things that are unforgiveable in a fine cuisine setting allowed in a lower-priced item (like a poboy) or in a home kitchen?

I stand by my assertion: if it tastes good, it is.

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It is all about the end product and how it tastes. Think Cheez Whiz and cheese steaks.

I am not a fan of Kitchen Bouquet because so many unskilled cooks often use too heavy a hand when adding it to a gravy. And it is not the sort of ingredient one expects in a three star kitchen.

But I'm sure there are long-standing family restaurants with recipes calling for a dash of Kitchen Bouquet that are passed from generation to generation.

Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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It's a matter of degree, I think. I came across a recipe for Worcestershire sauce yesterday, but I'm pretty sure I'm sticking with the paper-wrapped bottle. Technically that's a shortcut.

I don't have a problem with Kitchen Bouquet as such; particularly now that I know it's pretty much a coloring agent. And given the method for producing the gravy at Parasol's, I can see why it's necessary.

But Holly's right, I'd be surprised to see it in a white-tablecloth restaurant. Without giving it too much reflection, I guess I'd resent the use of that kind of shortcut in that context?

Now jarred roux, while I haven't used it, I don't see as much of a shortcut. After all, somebody had to cook the damn stuff to get the right color... (unless they're using kitchen bouqet IN the jarred roux, but that's a rabbit hole best left for another time).

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I'll be the first to admit that there is planty to not like about Guy Fiori, but you you gotta give the guy some credit for getting where he is. While I can't watch his cooking show, Diner's Drive Ins and whatever is great tv programming. I watch it all the time. Put the guy in a suit and lose the peroxide and he could host the Today show. Turned me on to Surrey's here in town. I like his choices in personal transportation as well.

As far as KB, bring it on, and some Maggie sauce too.

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I'll be the first to admit that there is planty to not like about Guy Fiori, but you you gotta give the guy some credit for getting where he is. 

Okay, tongue firmly planted in cheek here, and no offense to you, but...

Credit? Credit for what? For being a big enough whore to show up in flip-flops and pitch Applebee's or TGI Friday's or whatever else they pay him to shill? Because I'm pretty sure I don't have to give him any more credit for that than your run-of-the-mill prostitute. At least real whores are discreet.

And I'm pretty sure that if you put that guy in a suit and lost the peroxide, and you'd have Howie fucking Mandel. You want Howie Mandel telling you were to eat?

I thought not.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I met Guy at an airport prior to Triple D.. He was a nice guy.. But there is something very feminine about him.. Maybe its his hair or something but, he reminds me of my old high school gym/health teacher.. Ms. Peterson. And there wasnt anything too feminine about her.

He is as rock and roll as Donny Osmond.

Never heard of Kitchen Bouquet before.. That sandwich didnt look particularly good but, I certainly respect the opinion's of its fans..

One thing I did miss while looking at the po boy is the amazing Bread down there.

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