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Jamsie

Marco Pierre White at Harveys

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Bravo these clips are priceless, thanks for sharing, i am only sad i never got to eat at harveys,

              -preston

Roux Brothers anybody?

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They are great, on the whole they don't try and treat us like idiots, everything doesn't have to be something you can throw together in 5 minutes. I really wish we could see some more serious cooking on TV these days.


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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just out of interest, albert's scrambled eggs were made by adding 3 eggs to the butter and stirring for 10 minutes? Does anyone know their consistancy when they're finished? Does it look like normal scrambled egg?

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Matthew - brilliant. Just brilliant.

I think everyone should be forced to watch at least the eggs episode.


I love animals.

They are delicious.

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This is great stuff! I wish there were more programs showing chefs in their own kitchens. The food side of programs is great, but to see into the chefs on their own turf is timeless.

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Marco with Nico Ladenis:

Only realised the other day that my £5 secondhand copy of My Gastronomy is signed by NL himself. :wub:


In the long run...we are all dead (J M Keynes)

Heston's Disneyland for Sexless Fortysomethings...(Naebody)

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Thank you Matt, these clips are great. Is is me or were the 80s programs better than today's cooking shows??? I learned more watching these than most stuff I have seen the last few years.

Especially in the case of Marco, where he cooks in front of you his signature restaurant dishes. I don't think there is anyone who does this today. I would love to see today's chefs cook in their kitchen their dishes.

On another note, Marco has probably the best technique I have seen in a chef. His knives skills, the way he moves in the kitchen, he is great to watch, and shows how far ahead he was. I have seen ramsay in the kitchen, I don't think he has Marco's skill and elegance.

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I thought it was quite prophetic how both Albert Roux and Nico Ladenis both told MPW to slow down lest he burn himself out, which is effectively what he did in the end.


In the long run...we are all dead (J M Keynes)

Heston's Disneyland for Sexless Fortysomethings...(Naebody)

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I don't know if this is going to sound a bit pretentious, in fact I know it probably is, but I've always considered MPW as the Van Morrison of cooking. Both genuises in their own fields, their best work created at a precociously young age (Van Morrison wrote Astral Weeks when he was 22) and paid for with massive personal sacrifice. Also both seem to now regard their earlier (best) work with an outward disdain, but which is probably something more like fear. Fear that they'll probably never be that good again, but also that they'll be reminded of the terrible pain it took to achieve.

MPW on his more recent TV show kept saying how simple everything he did was, using stock cubes etc. which I'm sure is just a coping mechanism. And similarly Van Morrison has never revisited the dark personal themes of Astral Weeks, retreating instead into either MOR pop or Jazz-lite.

I suppose if you don't like Van Morrison then none of the above will make any sense at all, it's just something I've been thinking about.

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Watching Marco cooks for Albert Roux Part 1, it's funny seeing Gordon Ramsay submissively playing second fiddle and being the goodie goodie pupil. Now we know how Gordon learnt his signature Raviolo of lobster langoustine and salmon including how to close up the raviolo !

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