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Recipes That Rock: 2009


maggiethecat
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And I bet they can be prepared ahead and popped into the oven for the final browning at the last minute.  Perhaps even frozen.

I'm not sure about frozen, but the original (as far as I know) recipe from Fine Cooking magazine (here), which has a slightly different prep method, specifically says you can start them up to eight hours ahead of time. I'd think you could certainly start them a day ahead of time.

The one time I tried them, I had serious problems with sticking, but I assume I just didn't use enough oil. They were still very good.

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And I bet they can be prepared ahead and popped into the oven for the final browning at the last minute.  Perhaps even frozen.

I'm not sure about frozen, but the original (as far as I know) recipe from Fine Cooking magazine (here), which has a slightly different prep method, specifically says you can start them up to eight hours ahead of time. I'd think you could certainly start them a day ahead of time.

The one time I tried them, I had serious problems with sticking, but I assume I just didn't use enough oil. They were still very good.

I put mine on parchment so no problem with sticking.

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I'm not sure about frozen, but the original (as far as I know) recipe from Fine Cooking magazine (here), which has a slightly different prep method, specifically says you can start them up to eight hours ahead of time. I'd think you could certainly start them a day ahead of time.

Jacques Pepin had a recipe for smashed potatoes in Fine Cooking (I'm pretty sure it was FC), too. His involved cooking the potatoes in a skillet with chicken stock, then when the stock was gone you smashed them and let them fry in oil. I can't remember if the oil was added with the stock (like when making gyoza) or after the stock was gone. I made it once and it was very very good, but the quality of chicken stock was very important.

ETA: It's called Potatoes Fondante and it's from Fine Cooking 64, pp. 59, May 1, 2004. It's only available to members, unfortunately. And the potatoes aren't as smushed.

Edited by prasantrin (log)
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Hey folks --

I know asparagus season is mostly done, but it just occurred to me that I should post my new absolute favorite asparagus recipe. I mean, this has now topped grilled/roasted asparagus, which I didn't think could be done. What's ridiculous is that it is just three ingredients -- asparagus, pecorino romano, and olive oil -- but they go together so perfectly that I was blown away... Note that while the recipe (linked to) below calls for a squeeze of lemon, I think it is actually better without. Also, I used a good bit more romano than she calls for.

http://eggsonsunday.wordpress.com/2009/05/...ecorino-recipe/

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ETA:  It's called Potatoes Fondante and it's from Fine Cooking 64, pp. 59, May 1, 2004.  It's only available to members, unfortunately.  And the potatoes aren't as smushed.

I used to make the Jacques Pepin's Potatoes Fondant a lot until Fine Cooking produced "Crowd Pleasing Crispy Potatoes" in it's January, 2007 edition. These are spuds that are boiled, flattened and baked in the oven in olive oil. Delicious. But, I can't wait to try these Crash Hot Potatoes. I think the crusty bits on top will be delicious. Thank you for the link.

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Michael Chiarello's recipe for "Potatoes "Da Delfina" are another variation on the theme. Like some of mentioned here, they are also done stove-top and are also very delicious.

http://www.napastyle.com/recipe/recipe.jsp...bCategoryId=719

(Hope that that works.)

What I like so much about the Crash Hot Potatoes is that after you "crash" them, the oven does everything else for you. They are less greasy than the stove-top versions and turn out with much crispier crevasses.

I thought that I remembered someone saying that they had problems with the potatoes sticking to the sheet pan, but I cannot find it now. If that is happening, just brush some olive oil on the sheet pan before you put the potatoes on it.

Warning: try not to eat all of the potatoes off of the sheet pan before plating them and taking them to the table.

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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And I bet they can be prepared ahead and popped into the oven for the final browning at the last minute.  Perhaps even frozen.

I'm not sure about frozen, but the original (as far as I know) recipe from Fine Cooking magazine (here), which has a slightly different prep method, specifically says you can start them up to eight hours ahead of time. I'd think you could certainly start them a day ahead of time.

The one time I tried them, I had serious problems with sticking, but I assume I just didn't use enough oil. They were still very good.

I put mine on parchment so no problem with sticking.

Thanks for the make-ahead details and the parchment tip. Not only no sticking, but *so* much easier clean-up!

I'm thinking the very tiniest of new potatoes that are about to appear now that spring is finally here for real, topped with creme fraiche, and domestic caviar. Serve with ice-cold Prosecco, while wearing one of your favorite spring frocks and sandals, on the deck in the very late afternoon. Guests optional. Lordy.

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Thanks for the make-ahead details and the parchment tip.  Not only no sticking, but  *so* much easier clean-up!

I'm thinking the very tiniest of new potatoes that are about to appear now that spring is finally here for real, topped with creme fraiche, and domestic caviar.  Serve with ice-cold Prosecco, while wearing one of your favorite spring frocks and sandals, on the deck in the very late afternoon.  Guests optional.  Lordy.

Guests requiring sharing - so make lots (or forget the guests)!

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OH MY GOODNESS!!! We made something called Crash Hot Potatoes last night.

They are perfection. I can see them replacing just about every type of potato    that we make except for mashed and au gratin. They are tender and crispy golden at the same time. No need to turn or worry about burning. I have made something similar where you smash a small cooked potato with your palms and then fry it in a lot of oil in a skillet. These potatoes let the oven do all the work. I can't get over what a winner they are.

OMG I want to make them again tonight!

These are identical to the Fine Cooking recipe a couple of years ago, except you use a potato masher to squish them down.

I tried them this way tonight just to see. To me, the masher breaks up the potato a lot more, leaving it more vulnerable to breaking apart, although it does expose more of the potato insides to crisp up.

And I always use parchment paper underneath.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I bit, and so microed three tiny Yukes at lunchtime -- why boil three potatoes was my thinking, (altho I reject the four micro-onde for other preps, like roesti. )I used the masher, which worked just fine.

Couldn't rationalize turning the oven up high to cook three tiny spuds, so I put my trusty 1.99 Ikea non-stick Stekka pan on the stove top, added butter and oil, turned up the heat and added the little smashers smashed side down. They turned delectably crispy and brown in a couple of minutes, so I flipped them for another minute, then pulled them off and ate them. They were fabulous.

When I'm cooking for more than one, I'll for sure try the longer oven version. But even my lazy version rocked.

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Margaret McArthur

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we've been doing a stovetop version of these for one of our teambuilding menus for years...we hand "smoosh" them (verrrry theraputic!) and finish them stovetop in some rosemary infused olive oil. they are very, very popular, and out of all the menu items, this is the dish people make over and over.

the very best thing about them---make more than you think you'll need,and set some aside ('cuz otherwise, there wont be left-overs, even if you made more than enough---that's how good they are). next morning, scramble a couple eggs in with those cracked potatoes with rosemary. i'm tellin' you....heaven!

"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

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Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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I bit, and so microed three tiny Yukes at lunchtime -- why boil three potatoes was my thinking, (altho I reject the four micro-onde for other preps, like roesti. )I used the masher, which worked just fine.

Couldn't rationalize turning the oven up high  to cook three tiny spuds, so I put my trusty 1.99 Ikea non-stick Stekka pan on the stove top, added butter and oil, turned up the heat and added the little smashers smashed side down. They turned delectably crispy and brown in a couple of minutes, so I flipped them for another minute, then pulled them off and ate them. They were fabulous.

When I'm cooking for more than one, I'll for sure try the longer oven version. But even my lazy version rocked.

Brilliant! I never thought of using the nuker to cook the potatoes first but you are so right when only a small portion is needed.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Nice hearing how you vary your's.

I have made variations of the potatoes where you just press or squash them. What I really like about the potato masher in the Crash Hot Potato version is that it gives you lots of peaks and valleys. All the more crispies. I do not care if some of them fall apart. To me they are all about the crispy texture.

It does seem like there are a lot of us who are potato addicts, and can admit it freely and openly. "Hi, I'm a potatoaholic..."

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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I've recently been into halibut, which is a change since I'm not a big fish fan in general. So when I saw halibut cheeks (out of the ocean the night before) on the opening day of the farmer's market, I grabbed them. I also bought some local aged fontina (dry enough to grate like parm) and chard, local potatoes, etc, and made seared fontina crusted halibut with sauteed chard and horseradish mashed potatoes with a ridiculous amount of cream and butter. And it was fish, so totally healthy...anyways I felt virtuous, most everything was organic and grown or harvested within 100 miles. Not the most complicated dish I've ever made, but definitely one of the best of the year.

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Nice hearing how you vary your's.

 

  I have made variations of the potatoes where you just press or squash them. What I really like about the potato masher in the Crash Hot Potato version is that it gives you lots of peaks and valleys. All the more crispies. I do not care if some of them fall apart. To me they are all about the crispy texture.

  It does seem like there are a lot of us who are potato addicts, and can admit it freely and openly. "Hi, I'm a potatoaholic..."

I made cioppino on Monday night with crab, scallops, shrimp, halibut, swordfish and calimari, made these potatoes to go with/in. SO good, but in this application next time I'd peel them. They were a little unwieldy.

I've recently been into halibut, which is a change since I'm not a big fish fan in general.  So when I saw halibut cheeks (out of the ocean the night before) on the opening day of the farmer's market, I grabbed them.  I also bought some local aged fontina (dry enough to grate like parm) and chard, local potatoes, etc, and made seared fontina crusted halibut with sauteed chard and horseradish mashed potatoes with a ridiculous amount of cream and butter.  And it was fish, so totally healthy...anyways I felt virtuous, most everything was organic and grown or harvested within 100 miles.  Not the most complicated dish I've ever made, but definitely one of the best of the year.

Healthy ! :wink::raz: I like the way you think! This sounds delicious........

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  • 4 weeks later...

I was commenting on The Secrets of a Restaurant Chef series on the FoodNetwork thread when I realized that what I was commenting on WAS one of the recipes this year that truly rocked my tastebuds!!!!!

It was the meatballs by Anne Burrell. They were really good the first time around with her marinara on pasta. BUT, when I defrosted some, heated in the oven and then mixed with the marinara, placed on a toasted club roll with more marinara and fresh mozzarella, broiled to melt the cheese, spinkled with some shredded Parm and chopped fresh basil and italian leaf parsley......well....truly sublime! I will admit to subbing ground chicken for the veal (the store just did not have ground veal that day) but STILL.............

Donna

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Nice to see this thread pop up again. So I went looking in my records of all the new recipes tried this year (ok, yep, embarrassing, but I keep an excel spreadsheet of them...), and found that most of the recent big hits have been desserts. However one recipe seemed worth posting here... A soba noodle with light sesame sauce... I've now made it three times, each time without the tofu, and also substituting broccoli for the snow peas. But the sauce, to me, is just perfect -- the right proportions, just lightly dresses the noodles, but provides lots of flavor... Tastes great warm or cold, so is nice to make for weekday lunches...

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/01/health/n...cipehealth.html

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Oh, oh, oh !

I have a couple I did this weekend for a special anniversary dinner for some friends.

Bobby Flay's Red Wine Marinated Flank Steak Stuffed with Prosciutto, Fontina and Basil........

OMG. This was amazing. You butterfly a flank steak, and then marinate it overnight in Cabernet, olive oil and shallots. Then you season w/ S&P, layer thin prosciutto slices, thin slices of Fontina cheese and basil leaves over the cut side, roll it up like a bracciole and tie it. Rub the outside with EVOO and S&P and sear it on a hot grill. Move it to the cool side and cook to your liking. Served with a reduction of more Cabernet, shallots and peppercorns, sweetened with honey. One of the honorees really doesn't care for beef, but she scarfed this up ! You can find the full recipe on the Food Network website.

Served with...........

Homemade crusty French bread, shaped into a boule, from the February 2009 "Cuisine At Home" article called "Bread 101". The best bread I've made yet. Really good crust, REALLY good crumb, pretty easy to do.

I was a rock star with this meal.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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I am always trying new peanut sauce recipes, but I think I may have finally found the one that has just the balance I'm looking for. It is from Entertaining for a Veggie Planet by Didi Emmons (the Peanut Dressing, not the All Purpose Peanut Sauce, which I haven't tried. yet.) The ingredients list looks pretty standard except that it contains a full cup of flavorless oil, which is drizzled in at the end using a food processor, much like making mayonnaise. I tried it before the oil was added, and it tasted like a lot of other peanut sauces I've made: that is, fine, but not *quite* what I was looking for. But adding the oil rounds out the flavor, gives a lot of body to the sauce (the volume actually increases more than a cup; again, like making mayo), and somehow makes everything come together. Strangely, despite the large quantity, it doesn't dilute the flavor at all.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A terrific salad (click on salads and then look for the watermelon, lime, red onion, and avocado with cilantro one) was tasted at my friend's 4th of July party. Wow! Dianne is a wonderful cook and a great pastry chef....but this salad was out of this world. So looking forward to making it for my family and friends. Couldn't believe where she got the recipe! :blink:

Donna

Donna

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Hello Everyone

I would like to share this wonderful chicken recipe I was given by a friend from Lebanon, very ease and truly the taste is much more than the parts, please adjust to personal preferences.

Will just give the outline as you wonderful cooks will pick up the gist,

4 chicken breasts, skin on if preferred, chopped into large pieces

juice of 1-3 lemons depending on your taste and the juicyness of the lemons

3 tbs dark soy sauce

1- 4 crushed garlic cloves

enough Virgin Olive Oil to cover

Allow to marinate for at least 30 mins then slowly simmer in the oil until cooked. I like to serve with basmati rice mixed with petit pois and a well dressed green salad. This has become a well loved staple recipe in our house.

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Hello Everyone

I would like to share this wonderful chicken recipe I was given by a friend from Lebanon, very ease and truly the taste is much more than the parts, please adjust to personal preferences.

Will just give the outline as you wonderful cooks will pick up the gist, 

4 chicken breasts, skin on if preferred, chopped into large pieces

juice of 1-3 lemons depending on your taste and the juicyness of the lemons

3 tbs dark soy sauce

1- 4 crushed garlic cloves

enough Virgin Olive Oil to cover

Allow to marinate for at least 30 mins then slowly simmer in the oil until cooked. I like to serve with basmati rice mixed with petit pois and a well dressed green salad. This has  become a well loved staple recipe in our house.

This sounds intriguing. I've never simmered anything in olive oil before. It's not often that I can't imagine how something will taste, but I'm mystified. It's going to be fun to try this one.

I hadn't checked this thread for awhile & I see that I'm missed some great stuff...

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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Hello Everyone

I would like to share this wonderful chicken recipe I was given by a friend from Lebanon, very ease and truly the taste is much more than the parts, please adjust to personal preferences.

Will just give the outline as you wonderful cooks will pick up the gist, 

4 chicken breasts, skin on if preferred, chopped into large pieces

juice of 1-3 lemons depending on your taste and the juicyness of the lemons

3 tbs dark soy sauce

1- 4 crushed garlic cloves

enough Virgin Olive Oil to cover

Allow to marinate for at least 30 mins then slowly simmer in the oil until cooked. I like to serve with basmati rice mixed with petit pois and a well dressed green salad. This has  become a well loved staple recipe in our house.

It looks wonderful and intriguing. Although I can't help but notice that using all that olive oil must be expensive. What do you do with it after you use it? Just throw it out?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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eldereno,

I do not know if it is just me, but I was not able to find the salad you spoke of. Has anyone found it?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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