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Recipes That Rock: 2009


maggiethecat
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Not new and not earth-shattering, but I got Penelope Casas's Delicioso! for xmas and the orange/red onion/mint/marcona almond salad sure has been hitting the spot this cold, dreary winter. Also started making hot spring eggs this past month or so and holy cow if those aren't as tasty as all the cool kids said two years ago. I'm behind the times, I know. Still: rocking-ness and new to me.

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Ok folks -- finally an appetizer I can be proud of. Made the Muhammara recipe from epicurious (it is a roasted red pepper and walnut dip).... Spread it on lightly toasted french bread slices, then topped with manchego cheese and broiled until cheese was brown and bubbly. Delicious. Two separate batches of company scarfed them up. Note that I think the combo of flavor is critical here -- I thought the dip on its own / on chips was a little sweet for my taste, but the cheese, bread, and broiling brought it all together...

Here's the muhammara recipe I used (roughly) http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/vie...uhammara-350402

Emily

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Varkenshaas

Don't ask me how to pronounce this, but this was the most tender pork tenderloin I have ever eaten with a fabulous mustard sauce.

Thanks for posting this. I made this the other night and the sauce was delicious. My husband is coming up with different ways to use the leftover sauce.

I like cows, too. I hold buns against them. -- Bucky Cat.

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I picked up "Cookin' Up A Storm," a book of recipes compiled from the New Orleans Times Picayune, and fell madly in love withthe recipe for Creole okra. Quick, easy, and delicious - not much more you can ask for. Also eminently adjustable - you can add sausage, shrimp, extra spice, mushrooms, you know it. Admittedly I now realize I sort of live on okra but I guess that's okay for a Louisiana girl...

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Ina Garten's Chicken Bouillabaisse from her latest cookbook..."Back to Basics".

Quite possibly the best thing I've ever made. It was fricking amazing.

With Cook's Illustrated ciabatta bread from the most recent issue, and a romaine salad to start, an absolutely outstanding dinner.

Oh man. That chicken (especialy the sauce) was sublime. I ate until I was about to pop.

Worth buying the book just for that recipe. Seriously.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Pierogi, I have found quite a few recipes in that book that definitely "Rock" and have been as you said, worth the price of the book. The Cape Cod Salad has wowed everyone we have made it for. The Roasted Pears with Blue Cheese are also really yummy. I cut down the number of pears but made all of the filling and liquid. Extra filling is highly recommended.

I looked at the Chicken Bouilllabaisse. The photo makes it look very greasy. Could you describe the dish, please?

Thanks!

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Pierogi, I have found quite a few recipes in that book that definitely "Rock" and have been as you said, worth the price of the book. The Cape Cod Salad has wowed everyone we have made it for. The Roasted Pears with Blue Cheese are also really yummy. I cut down the number of pears but made all of the filling and liquid. Extra filling is highly recommended.

  I looked at the Chicken Bouilllabaisse. The photo makes it look very greasy. Could you describe the dish, please?

Thanks!

I am quite looking forward to cooking my way through this one, especially if the bouillabaisse is representative !

That picture does the dish no justice, IMO. The sauce really becomes quite silky and thickens up considerably when you puree it. For those w/out the book, basically you brown chicken parts, then add garlic (lots !) fennel seeds and saffron, toss a bit, then add tomato puree, white wine, chicken stock and Pernod. Let that simmer for like 45 min, then puree. Ina says to use a blender, I used a stick blender in the pot, no harm no foul as they say. Then you put back the browned chicken pieces and baby Yukon gold potatoes, and cook again for about another 45 min. or until everything is tender. Splash in a bit more Pernod, or white wine. Serve with a garlic/saffron/red pepper flake rouille.

So, blending the garlic into the sauce, as I said, makes it quite silky and thickens it. I didn't find it excessively greasy at all. Nice anise undertone from the fennel seeds and the Pernod, good mellow garlic taste, and that something-something from the saffron.

That having been said, I DIDN'T cook it in the oven as the recipe said to. The oven was in use for another project at a much higher temp than the bouillabaisse was supposed to cook at. So I covered the pot, and set it on a low simmer (this was all in a Le Cruset) on the stove top for probably about an hour total (I based it on whether the potatoes were done, figuring if they were, so was the chicken).

I don't know if the cooking method impacted the amout of fat released by the chicken parts or not. Alton Brown or Shirley Corriher, I'm not.

Oh, and I did trim a LOT of excess fat from the chicken pieces before I browned them.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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Here's a pork roast rolled around fresh herbs that I think definitely qualifies. My favorite thing about it is that the herb stuffing includes a heap of fresh arugula leaves. It's easy, beautiful, delicious hot or cold, and inexpensive.

Edited by Abra (log)
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I have a recipe to add from Melissa Clark found on The Wednesday's Chef blog.  It's Roasted Shrimp and Broccoli.  Fast, uses one pan and is so delicious!  Try it and let me know what you think...

Roasted Shrimp and Broccoli

Meredith -- thank you so much for posting this -- Just finished eating it and had to post immediately as it was FANTASTIC! So easy, so good -- definitely a recipe that rocks!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've found two that I really like and that people rave about.

One is (I know!) a Rachael Ray recipe called Christmas Pasta. I do make a few modifications: I use all spicy sausage instead of spicy & mild, and I use 20% hamburger instead of veal. This makes a great "gravy" that we're considering trying in sloppy joes.

http://www.rachaelraymag.com/recipes/30-mi...ta/article.html

The other I found in 150 Best American Recipes (which I have thanks to raves on eGullet). It's for Tuscan Rosemary Pine Nut bars. These aren't FROM Tuscany but are rather inspired by Tuscany. I served this with an ice wine for dessert one night - great pairing.

I found the recipe reproduced in various articles, citing its original source (since 150 Best is an anthology).

http://www.thefoodpaper.com/recipes/tuscanbars.html

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This has been my year to try new ingredients, new dishes, and new techniques. I've had some spectacular failures (we won't talk about the mung beans in coconut milk....), but I've also had some huge successes. I think my two favorites to date are Carbonnades a la Flamande, and Linguine with Squash, Bacon and Goat Cheese. Here are the links to my blog posts for each:

http://kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com/2009...on-a-snowy-day/

And the linguine....

http://kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com/2009...this-right-now/

(also posted on the foodbuzz blog site)

Almost makes me wish it'd be cold again, so I could make the carbonnades a la flamande again.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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At the risk of being redundant, I want to LAVISH praise upon the Roasted Shrimp and Broccoli recipe. This is like the definition of a recipe that rocks - fast, easy, unfussy, dirties just one pan and one bowl, and totally delicious. If you weren't convinced already, go and make it now!

"Nothing you could cook will ever be as good as the $2.99 all-you-can-eat pizza buffet." - my EX (wonder why he's an ex?)

My eGfoodblog: My corner of the Midwest

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Oh my gosh, does this recipe from the PBS show "Everyday Cooking" (thanks Martha!) totally rock.Cherry Tomato crisp.Cherry Tomato Crisp.I made it as the lady on "Everyday Food" did it, viz: Don't grate your parm, just break in some chunks. Leave garlic whole. A few pulses. Like, ten seconds and twenty minutes to a baked tomato/crispy crunchy jamboree side dish, that incorporates bright veg and starch. And texture.

Most highly recommended. And, so easy.

Edited by maggiethecat (log)

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Oh my gosh, does this recipe from the PBS show "Everyday Cooking" (thanks Martha!) totally rock.Cherry Tomato crisp.Cherry Tomato Crisp.I made it as the lady on "Everyday Food" did it, viz: Don't grate your parm, just break in some chunks. Leave garlic whole. A few pulses. Like, ten seconds and twenty minutes to a baked tomato/crispy crunchy jamboree side dish, that incorporates  bright veg and starch. And texture.

Most highly recommended. And, so easy.

Maggie, sounds great ! I make a similar dish that adds shrimp and begs for good bread and people who don't care if you are sopping up every bit of juice.................

Toasted Shrimp and Tomatoes

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Carrot Macaroni and Cheese

This was STUPENDOUS.  It's probably the best version of Macaroni and Cheese I've ever had.  And that is saying a lot, given my love for the dish.

Really good.  Give it a whirl!

Jamon -- You've got to tell us a little more here! I'm really having a hard time wrapping my head around this. What is the texture like? And is it sweet? I would think the carrots would make for a very sweet macaroni and cheese, which really doesn't sound all that appetizing...

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Carrot Macaroni and Cheese

This was STUPENDOUS.  It's probably the best version of Macaroni and Cheese I've ever had.  And that is saying a lot, given my love for the dish.

Really good.  Give it a whirl!

Jamon -- You've got to tell us a little more here! I'm really having a hard time wrapping my head around this. What is the texture like? And is it sweet? I would think the carrots would make for a very sweet macaroni and cheese, which really doesn't sound all that appetizing...

I agree -- especially with the orange juice. The one review posted of the recipe says the same thing (too sweet). You didn't find it to be so?

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I clipped virtually the same recipe out of the New York Times (who knows how long ago) and finally got around to making it: Vietnamese Clay Pot Pork. This would also work well with chicken thighs, and it was plate-licking good.

Another rocker is the Slow-Braised Beef with Potatoes from Fuchsia Dunlop's "Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook." Another total winner. I did the basic braise a day ahead of time and added the potatoes day of serving.

Both recipes are drop dead easy, and are two that I'm not going to forget about.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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At the risk of being redundant, I want to LAVISH praise upon the Roasted Shrimp and Broccoli recipe.  This is like the definition of a recipe that rocks - fast, easy, unfussy, dirties just one pan and one bowl, and totally delicious.  If you weren't convinced already, go and make it now!

Emily & dividend-so glad you liked it! I have another quick and delicious recipe recommendation for you. It's from Nigel Slater: Pasta With Sausage, Basil & Mustard

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Varkenshaas

Don't ask me how to pronounce this, but this was the most tender pork tenderloin I have ever eaten with a fabulous mustard sauce.

Thanks for posting this. I made this the other night and the sauce was delicious. My husband is coming up with different ways to use the leftover

Ditto, ditto, ditto ! I'd have never found this without this hazardnc's post. I made it tonight, and it was fantastic. I think its the best pork tenderloin I've ever had. Great flavor in the meat itself (which can be a difficult thing to achieve with this cut) and the sauce was almost "drink-able" on its own. And quick to boot ! Gotta love it.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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I made Cook's Illustrated Baked Ziti for the second time in 2 months. Omg, yummy and easy( compared to their other recipes).

I also made a creamcheese pound cake from Smitten Kitchen's blog. It was crazy moist and delicious( and the beater blade for my KA rocks too)

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Oh my gosh, does this recipe from the PBS show "Everyday Cooking" (thanks Martha!) totally rock.Cherry Tomato crisp.Cherry Tomato Crisp.I made it as the lady on "Everyday Food" did it, viz: Don't grate your parm, just break in some chunks. Leave garlic whole. A few pulses. Like, ten seconds and twenty minutes to a baked tomato/crispy crunchy jamboree side dish, that incorporates  bright veg and starch. And texture.

Most highly recommended. And, so easy.

Maggie, sounds great ! I make a similar dish that adds shrimp and begs for good bread and people who don't care if you are sopping up every bit of juice.................

Toasted Shrimp and Tomatoes

Yowsa -- I can so see how shrimp would work in this dish. Bring on the good bread!

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I clipped virtually the same recipe out of the New York Times (who knows how long ago) and finally got around to making it:  Vietnamese Clay Pot Pork.  This would also work well with chicken thighs, and it was plate-licking good.

I am SO making this this weekend!

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Varkenshaas

Don't ask me how to pronounce this, but this was the most tender pork tenderloin I have ever eaten with a fabulous mustard sauce.

Thanks for posting this. I made this the other night and the sauce was delicious. My husband is coming up with different ways to use the leftover sauce.

I too made it and it was indeed tasty. Thanks for posting!

A truly destitute man is not one without riches, but the poor wretch who has never partaken of lobster. - anonymous
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