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Pierogi

What's the best hint/tip you found this year?

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tried the roasting nuts in the oven with some cashews. went for a single layer of nuts in a plate, the ones in the middle of the plate were burned while the ones on the edge were not browned. what did i do wrong? :(

Did you mean the oven or the microwave? I am assuming the microwave since you say you used a plate. They need to be done in short bursts of microwave power and I generally stir them around between bursts. Hope this helps. (Strange that the ones in the middle burned as I would have expected the opposite if you m/w'ed too long without stirring.)


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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I find it works much better if you toss the nuts with a couple of spoonsful of water first-much more even, with the occosional stir.

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My favorite new trick is The Perfect Poached Egg.  See method #4 - the Clingfilm Stampede.  Break egg into a ramekin or espresso cup.  Fold a large sheet of plastic wrap into a square and drop the egg into your palm in the cling film.  Wrap and tie up the ends so you have a little egg-in-a-plastic-bag.  Drop egg baggies into boiling water and set timer for 2 minutes 30 seconds.  Fish bags out and drop into ice water to suspend cooking.  Perfectly round little poached eggs every single time.  And the pan isn't even dirty.  I've tried every other poached egg method and all I've gotten is an egg white variant of weak egg drop soup.  This works like a charm every single time.  Bloody brilliant!!

if you put the clingfilm into the ramekin, and break the egg into it, you don´t even have to wash up the ramekin!!

I poach eggs like this all the time. I usually brush the clingflim very lightly with a little oil to make sure the egg doesn´t stick to it.

I think I might have my winner for the best food tip for 2009! This is brilliant... *slaps forehead*


Feast then thy heart, for what the heart has had, the hand of no heir shall ever hold.

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My favorite new trick is The Perfect Poached Egg.  See method #4 - the Clingfilm Stampede.  Break egg into a ramekin or espresso cup.  Fold a large sheet of plastic wrap into a square and drop the egg into your palm in the cling film.  Wrap and tie up the ends so you have a little egg-in-a-plastic-bag.  Drop egg baggies into boiling water and set timer for 2 minutes 30 seconds.  Fish bags out and drop into ice water to suspend cooking.  Perfectly round little poached eggs every single time.  And the pan isn't even dirty.  I've tried every other poached egg method and all I've gotten is an egg white variant of weak egg drop soup.  This works like a charm every single time.  Bloody brilliant!!

if you put the clingfilm into the ramekin, and break the egg into it, you don´t even have to wash up the ramekin!!

I poach eggs like this all the time. I usually brush the clingflim very lightly with a little oil to make sure the egg doesn´t stick to it.

I think I might have my winner for the best food tip for 2009! This is brilliant... *slaps forehead*

Klary:

Thanks for the oil tip. Will try that next time with a very quick spray of olive oil. I suppose if I'd read the instructions more carefully the first time I would have seen the part about doing it right into the ramekin. gallery_7409_6069_395.jpg

Yes - this is brilliance!!


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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My favorite new trick is The Perfect Poached Egg.  See method #4 - the Clingfilm Stampede.  Break egg into a ramekin or espresso cup.  Fold a large sheet of plastic wrap into a square and drop the egg into your palm in the cling film.  Wrap and tie up the ends so you have a little egg-in-a-plastic-bag.  Drop egg baggies into boiling water and set timer for 2 minutes 30 seconds.  Fish bags out and drop into ice water to suspend cooking.  Perfectly round little poached eggs every single time.  And the pan isn't even dirty.  I've tried every other poached egg method and all I've gotten is an egg white variant of weak egg drop soup.  This works like a charm every single time.  Bloody brilliant!!

I've been doing this for several years, since Bourdain described Arzak's technique in "Cook's Tour." (I use a twist tie for insurance, and butter the wrap. ) I agree, Bloody Brilliant!


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

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1912-2008

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Update. Note to self. Advice to oil/butter the wrap is both well intended and necessary. Having spent some time earlier this evening peeling/scraping one of those pre-poached eggs off it's wrapping with a spoon, the preparation of the cling film shall not be forgotten in the future...

The technique remains in the realm of genius. Clearly it is I, who is not equal to the task. :rolleyes:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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somewhere here I found the suggestion to cut the tendons on your drumsticks before cooking. What a difference! I used to hate the little buggers and now they are one of my favorite tender little morsels.

I think this trick was originally posted in either a discussion about spatchcocking or cooking Thanksgiving turkies by eGullet member slkinsey. And it is a great tip, indeed.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I just tried the egg-in-plastic poaching technique and my judgment is ... (sorry, A.B.) it's far too much effort for a simple egg. First, 2:30 at a full rolling boil and the yolk and some white were still raw. Second, it's a waste of a lot of plastic. Third, I don't find poaching eggs all that difficult in the first place -- and I poach eggs quite often.


Edited by chappie (log)

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My version of what she said (she can correct me if she wants) is to do it on high in an open bowl/measuring cup until you start to smell it.  With piñon this is 30 seconds or so, and whole almonds around 2 minutes.  Works like a charm and I've not burned a nut since.

That's about it. Nuke on high, giving them a stir now and then until they smell good. A big bowl of almonds takes 5 to 10 minutes depending on whether you want them lightly toasted for topping things or almost burnt for bark. Of course it will depend on the power of your microwave.

The hazelnuts I've been toasting over the past couple of days while I've been experimenting with gianduja - about a 1/2 cup at a time - I've nuked for between 2 and 3 minutes.

I just tried with pine nuts. It took quite some time for them to develop any color and they were a bit more brittle at the end than usual but the flavor was good. When I finally get the right amount of time for my microwave, I am sure I will benefit greatly for not having to watch them every few seconds. Thanks for the tip.

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I just tried the egg-in-plastic poaching technique and my judgment is ... (sorry, A.B.) it's far too much effort for a simple egg. First, 2:30 at a full rolling boil and the yolk and some white were still raw. Second, it's a waste of a lot of plastic. Third, I don't find poaching eggs all that difficult in the first place -- and I poach eggs quite often.

I have done this twice now and I think it's brilliant. I cook them for 2 minutes and 45 seconds and they are perfectly cooked. Best of all, no more cleaning up the white gunk on my pots which in my opinion, is a real PITA.

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My version of what she said (she can correct me if she wants) is to do it on high in an open bowl/measuring cup until you start to smell it.  With piñon this is 30 seconds or so, and whole almonds around 2 minutes.  Works like a charm and I've not burned a nut since.

That's about it. Nuke on high, giving them a stir now and then until they smell good. A big bowl of almonds takes 5 to 10 minutes depending on whether you want them lightly toasted for topping things or almost burnt for bark. Of course it will depend on the power of your microwave.

The hazelnuts I've been toasting over the past couple of days while I've been experimenting with gianduja - about a 1/2 cup at a time - I've nuked for between 2 and 3 minutes.

I just tried with pine nuts. It took quite some time for them to develop any color and they were a bit more brittle at the end than usual but the flavor was good. When I finally get the right amount of time for my microwave, I am sure I will benefit greatly for not having to watch them every few seconds. Thanks for the tip.

I tried this on some slivered almonds. They took forever and could have been done a lot faster in a pot on the stove.

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I have done this twice now and I think it's brilliant.  I cook them for 2 minutes and 45 seconds and they are perfectly cooked.  Best of all, no more cleaning up the white gunk on my pots which in my opinion, is a real PITA.

I tried this last night with a couple of eggs, and it is just brilliant. I cook them a bit longer, which is my preference, and I have never served a better cooked or better looking poached egg. I wiped the plastic with a little butter before sealing the eggs up and boiling, and was thrilled with how mess free it was. I could even pre-season them with salt and pepper by sprinkling them over the butter before adding the egg and twist-tying the bundles.

I especially like this technique because, if I am serving several people, I can prep the eggs a couple of hours in advance. Then I can just boil the all the pouches at once and serve them hot, which is hard to do when you are trying to boil them the traditional way. No more egg soup!


Edited by Batard (log)

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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If an indirectly "poached" egg is what you're looking for, then why not just purchase one of those pans for that purpose with the lift-out tray of cups that sits over boiling water?

I think it's funny to talk about the mess of cleaning a single pan compared to 20 little bundles of plastic wrap to cut open and dispose for a brunch of 10.

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What is the single best kitchen/cooking hint or tip or shortcut or technique you learned in 2008?  The source would be interesting as well.

another salt tip...

while i am averse to brining pork and poultry (just hate the *idea* of soaking a beautiful chicken in water) i was amazed to find how great brined dried beans are! soak 'em overnight in seriously salted water -- they cook up tender, never mushy and have great flavour. best dried cannellini ever. courtesy of a 2008 issue of Cook's Illustrated (the recipe for Tuscan Bean Stew).

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If an indirectly "poached" egg is what you're looking for, then why not just purchase one of those pans for that purpose with the lift-out tray of cups that sits over boiling water?

I think it's funny to talk about the mess of cleaning a single pan compared to 20 little bundles of plastic wrap to cut open and dispose for a brunch of 10.

I would never poach 20 eggs at once. I do 3 at once, max. It is quicker to snip the tops off 3 plastic bundles than it is to clean the white gunk off the pan. Those little inserts that fit into a pan? I have tried a number of them and have yet to find one that cooks evenly. My experience has been that the eggs turn out with raw white spots.


Edited by ElsieD (log)

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somewhere here I found the suggestion to cut the tendons on your drumsticks before cooking. What a difference! I used to hate the little buggers and now they are one of my favorite tender little morsels.

We owe this tip to slkinsey (Sam).

And, for those of you who are wondering what you do with the bounty on the deck/in the BBQ -- great hint, BTW!), or the boot of the car when it gets warm, it becomes time to consolidate the indoor freezer -- pitch all of those containers of who-knows-what that aren't labeled, and reduce the hell out of the chicken stock.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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From Jacques Pepin........

After pureeing something in a robot coup/cuisinart instead of trying to clean the blade with a rubber spatula (like I did for years) just clean the bowl, put the blade back in and turn it on. Everything flies off the blade. This trick made me feel really stupid.

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From Jacques Pepin........

After pureeing something in a robot coup/cuisinart instead of trying to clean the blade with a rubber spatula (like I did for years) just clean the bowl, put the blade back in and turn it on. Everything flies off the blade. This trick made me feel really stupid.

Wouldn't that require you to clean the bowl twice? Or get bits of puree all over your kitchen? Or I am missing the point entirely?


Robin

“Cooking is an art, but you eat it too.”

Marcella Hazan

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From Jacques Pepin........

After pureeing something in a robot coup/cuisinart instead of trying to clean the blade with a rubber spatula (like I did for years) just clean the bowl, put the blade back in and turn it on. Everything flies off the blade. This trick made me feel really stupid.

Wouldn't that require you to clean the bowl twice? Or get bits of puree all over your kitchen? Or I am missing the point entirely?

by clean the bowl i meant removing its contents with a rubber spatula. As for getting bits of puree all over the place, the robot coup doesnt function with the top off.

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Am I the only person who worries about plastics leaching into my food?  That clingfilm idea gives me the willies.

Me too.

I dont care what they say, there is very little evidence on safety. Most plastics are "Generally Recognised as Safe" - they even have an acronym [GRAS]. Means no-one really knows, but industry wants them to be safe so has lobbied successfully to have them recognised this way (in the '50's, if I remember correctly, when a huge plastics industry was developed for military use during the war, and industrialists quickly found domestic applications to ensure the industry did not fold when the war ended.)

I am far from being anti-technology and am not a conspiracy theorist, but really - there is something in this that makes me feel uncomfortable.


Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

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Am I the only person who worries about plastics leaching into my food?  That clingfilm idea gives me the willies.

I am far from being anti-technology and am not a conspiracy theorist, but really - there is something in this that makes me feel uncomfortable.

Perhaps. But most folks are cooking their eggs in a Teflon or some other form of coated cookware. Having seen those coatings flake off before, that sort of direct contact (if I were bothering to think that hard about it) skeeves me a lot more than the two minutes in cling wrap.

Anyone else a fan of the Joe Jackson song, "Everything Gives You Cancer?" :rolleyes:


Edited by KatieLoeb (log)

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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My favorite new tip involves de-seeding/watering tomatoes before dicing. Cut the tomato in half through the stem, cup it in your hand, and scoop out the seeds/watery stuff with your fingers, as if you were "shaking hands with the tomato." That either came from someone here, or Marcella Hazen, I can't figure out which. It's so simple, but thinking- shake hands with the tomato - de-soggified many a dish involving diced tomatoes.


"Nothing you could cook will ever be as good as the $2.99 all-you-can-eat pizza buffet." - my EX (wonder why he's an ex?)

My eGfoodblog: My corner of the Midwest

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