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Timing from butcher to table


ilikefood
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Hello All:

My uncle-in-law wants me to cook one goose and one duck for him. The duck and goose are both raised by him and were probably born early this year. I have no clue what type of goose it is, but it is all white. The duck is also all white so I assume its Peking, but not positive. The fowl are still alive and he will butcher/de-feather them when I want him to. My question is: how much time should there be between butchering and cooking? Do the birds need to cool down? Age?

I plan on roasting the goose - just plain and simple (the people I am cooking for like their meat and potatoes very plain with ketchup) and doing a steam + baking for the duck per Alton Brown and a couple posters here on Egullet.

Also, I hope to save the livers so I can practice deveining for future foie gras cooking. The fat will be saved and treated like gold. Any other suggestions for the other innards?

Thanks!

David

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They're gonna put ketchup on a goose? Maybe you should just microwave it.

Lol. I won't microwave it, but the end product must be good and tasty (my requirement) but must also seem "mild" or "tame" (their requirement). So exotic and bold flavor combinations are out. They would have a cardiac arrest if they saw pepper in the kitchen because its "too spicy."

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They're gonna put ketchup on a goose? Maybe you should just microwave it.

They would have a cardiac arrest if they saw pepper in the kitchen because its "too spicy."

Oh man, we feel your pain. The thing about goose and duck is that theyre awesome even cooked medium (and maybe a bit further). The meat stays great, and the skin goes crispy, but follow whichever skin preparing techniques you see fit. It'll be delicious for you, simple enough for them.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just a thought, but brining is a great way to make things delicious without looking "seasoned." You don't need to go with exotic flavors or anything. Who knows, you may expand their minds a bit when they wolf it all down and then you tell them what was in the brine.

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