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Penwu

Port or sherry for cocktails? Or both?

83 posts in this topic

Sorry to hear you got stuck with bad sherry. A Bamboo should be perfectly dry, the aperitif version of a dry Martini. (Though I believe Pouring Ribbons adds a barspoon of rich demerara for texture, but I don't remember whether that's the version in Shim.) Lustau Fino is great and widely available, and I've enjoyed every Manzanilla I've tried. Anything simply labeled "dry sherry," is likely to have sugar added, weirdly enough. Stick to stuff labeled fino, Manzanilla, Amontillado, or oloroso—each of these grades has a distinctive character, but they're all dry. Lustau's are all solid.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Yeah, Dry Sack is definitely too sweet for most cocktail uses that call for dry sherry. Plus, as I recall, it doesn't taste that good.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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I can second the Lustau Amontillado for use in the Bamboo. Not usually too hard to find.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Well since sherry seems to be where it's at, I thought I'd better get with it, so I tried this from Jeffrey Morgenthaler:

 

2 ounces Scotch whisky

1 ounce Pedro Ximénez Sherry

2-3 dashes orange bitters

Stir ingredients with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

 

attachicon.gif004 (480x640).jpg

 

This is a surprising drink; I expected the sweetness to predominate but actually it's quite strongly salty; the Scotch tones down the sherry a lot and the typical Scotch flavours get a nice gentle nuance from the extra fruit.

 

 

 I tried this  (Scottish Breakfast) last night using Glenlivet 12 yo. It needed less sherry (or more scotch) but was quite good even before adjusting. I'd say this would be a good one to play with balancing for different whisky or even your own blend to get different effects.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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 I tried this  (Scottish Breakfast) last night using Glenlivet 12 yo. It needed less sherry (or more scotch) but was quite good even before adjusting. I'd say this would be a good one to play with balancing for different whisky or even your own blend to get different effects.

 

With Scotch based drinks I find it very helpful to be pretty specific with what type of scotch you are using since there can be considerable variation from region to region and brand to brand. Most of the time when generic scotch is called for in a cocktail it seems to typically be calling for a fairly light blend like Famous Grouse unless otherwise specified.

 

I would tend to think Glenlivet 12 is not too different from a blend like Famous Grouse although I have had neither in a while to really compare.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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