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Leftover cooked lobster meat


CaliPoutine
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We took a trip to Nova Scotia in July for a family reunion. We brought back about 1.5lbs of lobster meat. I froze it while we were at the hotel, and its been sitting in my deep freeze ever since.

What can I make that will be edible? I was originally thinking of a lobster pot pie, but I dont want anything that heavy. Could I use it for a lighter pasta? A pizza maybe? Lobster is on sale this week for 8.99lb so if I needed more, I could get it.

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Is it precooked? Or raw? In either case, you want a preparation that cooks it as little as possible -- heats it through in the case of precooked.

Butter, chives, S&P, and lemon zest makes a good pasta sauce. And there's always the classic lobster roll.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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How about lobster strudel? A sheet of puff pastry ,some bechamel and some aromatics.

Quick and spiffy and great finger food.You could probably get two strudels from 1 1/2 pound and add in other goodies per tastes . I also make a very nice strudel with mushroom pate' that would make a nice mix and match.

HTH

Jorge

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We were recently at a champagne brunch at the Mohegan Sun. There was a pasta station where the guy would create a pasta dish in a made to order pan sauce. The inherant problem with this is that you don't get to taste the work in progress. If you were making it yourself and tasting, you know what to add. Deb had him make a lobster fra diavolo with penne pasta that I thought was remarkably good. I remember thinking though, that I would like to add a little more garlic, a pinch of crushed red pepper, a good splash of vodka, a bit of heavy cream followed by the chunks of precooked lobster meat and the cooked pasta.

Now I 'm getting hungry.

HC

Edited by HungryChris (log)
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Lobster, asparagus, and orange is a classic combination. For the sauce, reduce fresh orange juice, grated peel, and a little lemon juice. Strain, then stir in some cold butter, a bit of cream, and a pinch of salt. In the meantime, cook some penne rigate in salted water, adding the peeled and cut asparagus for the last few minutes. Also in the meantime, gently reheat the lobster meat in butter. Mix everything together, adding a little of the pasta water if needed. Adjust the salt, if needed. Some minced flat-leaf parsley as a garnish is optional.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Let me get this said.

It stinks for the lobster fishermen--I can't imagine how they are paying their bills with the price of lobster.

But it has meant that we are having lobster pretty often this winter. I don't think not buying the cheap lobsters is gonna help them. If i lived near the docks i'd go and buy directly from them but I don't.

So, anyway-we had too much food on NYE--the lobsters got steamed, but weren't eaten.

Five pounds of lobster results in a lot of meat--two meals worth, in my opinion.

So last night we had warm lobster salad--a bed of red leaf lettuce, a little sorrel, carrot strips, cukes, grape tomatoes, some roasted cauliflower bits, water chestnuts, and a warm thai-style vinaigrette--lemon juice, fish sauce, sesame oil, sugar, pepper flakes, left over butter, olive oil--sauteed some garlic, ginger and green onion in the vinaigrette, added lobster chunks and stirred til warm --served over the greens with bread and butter on the side--delish, if i do say so myself.

Tonight will be lobster pasta--what do you like best--red, olive oil, cream--a combo of sauces? I don't want to overwhelm the lob, just enhance

All suggestions welcome.

Zoe

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Tonight will be lobster pasta--what do you like best--red, olive oil, cream--a combo of sauces?  I don't want to overwhelm the lob, just enhance

All suggestions welcome.

Zoe

Simply saute (reheat actually) the lobster in olive oil w/ a little minced garlic, toss into pasta. A little flaked red pepper would not hurt.

One of my favorite meals involving leftover lobster was to slice the tail meat pretty thinly, serve cold with a lime/garlic/ginger/fish sauce dipping sauce and/or a nice ponzu.

Lobster cakes (make just like crab cakes only use lobster) is another good way to use the leftovers.

Edited by 6ppc (log)

Jon

--formerly known as 6ppc--

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I've been making lobster and grits a lot:

Saute diced onion, celery, and bell pepper in a lot of butter (half a stick to a stick, depending on how much lobster you have), without browning. Stir in a little flour, add lobster stock or water, and simmer until thickened but still very buttery. Season with a liberal amount of Old Bay, a little sriracha, and half a lemon's worth of juice. Add chopped lobster and stir until coated and warmed through. Serve over grits, or alongside awendaw.

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If you still have the shells you can make lobster broth out of them and turn it into lobster bisque.

can you (or anyone else here) rec'd a good lobster broth recipe, or is it just simmer the shells in water with an onion and some parsley?

(and a bisque recipe too if you wouldnt mind)?

thanks

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If you still have the shells you can make lobster broth out of them and turn it into lobster bisque.

can you (or anyone else here) rec'd a good lobster broth recipe, or is it just simmer the shells in water with an onion and some parsley?

(and a bisque recipe too if you wouldnt mind)?

thanks

here's a classic recipe

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/vie...er-Stock-231559

but really you can just make a simple stock if you want--the most important thing is to cook for a very short time--my fish guy told me this--and it's true--any fish/shellfish--just cook for about 15 minutes.

and guys--each suggestion is more luscious than the last! It does seem that anything you do with lobster will be fabulous!

I do feel strangely drawn to the lob and grits, though! If i can talk the hub into this i might go that route--he doesn't love shrimp & grits as much as i do--when we are in Charleston I have em at least once a day!

Zoe

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If you still have the shells you can make lobster broth out of them and turn it into lobster bisque.

can you (or anyone else here) rec'd a good lobster broth recipe, or is it just simmer the shells in water with an onion and some parsley?

(and a bisque recipe too if you wouldnt mind)?

thanks

here's a classic recipe

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/vie...er-Stock-231559

but really you can just make a simple stock if you want--the most important thing is to cook for a very short time--my fish guy told me this--and it's true--any fish/shellfish--just cook for about 15 minutes.

That's a good stock recipe, but if you really want to go crazy and make it extra rich, start with some mirepoix, lots of tarragon, and a bay leaf, then once that's sweated add the lobster shells and cook them a bit. As the shells go in, I throw in a mixture of cognac and dry sherry, then put some fish stock in along with the tomaley. Simmer it for about an hour to produce a broth that has a lot of flavor and is very condensed. Then just add cream or cream + cornstarch slurry, some tomato paste, season, add bits of lobster and enjoy.

I think you need longer cooking for this broth because it really condenses the flavor and makes a super rich lobster broth.

nunc est bibendum...

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I made my lobster stock with leftover rose prosecco and a splash of some really good dry vermouth, plus aromatics. Took awhile to get to simmer but once it did I think I simmered for 45 minutes? Fifteen just seems way too short, but I've also gone far too long in the past with the result being a funky off flavor.

Question: Now that I've strained the shells and solids off and dumped them, can I simmer the stock again to reduce it without harm?

My friend told me of a butter he made by roasting lobster shells quite crispy, breaking them in pieces and then poaching them in lots of butter. Then, he pureed the entire mixture shells and all, ran through a sieve and allowed to solidify.

(Imagine lobster meat gently cooked in this butter ...)

I didn't do that New Year's Eve, but right after dinner I took the massive amounts of roe from the three fat crustaceans, plus some tomalley, and made a beautiful pinkish compound butter with parsley added in at the end. I've only had it slathered on toast so far, but it's pretty great.

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I do feel strangely drawn to the lob and grits, though!  If i can talk the hub into this i might go that route--he doesn't love shrimp & grits as much as i do--when we are in Charleston I have em at least once a day!

Zoe

It really works. The lobster flavor isn't covered up, and it doesn't have that vibe a lot of post-Thanksgiving recipes have, where turkey is just shoehorned into something for the sake of using up turkey. That was the problem I ran into when I started using up leftover lobster (lobster has been as cheap as pork chops for the last couple months, around here). I'm sure you could sub lobster for shrimp in a lot of other recipes that call for cooked shrimp, of course.

If it's the grits your husband doesn't like, you could make it with rice or egg noodles?

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I made my lobster stock with leftover rose prosecco and a splash of some really good dry vermouth, plus aromatics. Took awhile to get to simmer but once it did I think I simmered for 45 minutes? Fifteen just seems way too short, but I've also gone far too long in the past with the result being a funky off flavor.

Question: Now that I've strained the shells and solids off and dumped them, can I simmer the stock again to reduce it without harm?

I have -- but I simmered the stock for a full hour, too, which is what I do with shrimp heads. I thought the warning about 15 minutes was only for fish, not shellfish, but I'm sure someone has an authoritative answer and explanation.

Anyway, I can't compare the reduced stock side by side with the initial stock, but I felt I had to reduce it because the only pot I could fit the lobsters in and cover was ... the lobster pot. The amount of stock I wound up with ... if I didn't reduce it, I would have tossed most of it out. Reduced, it was stronger than I would want in a soup/chowder/etc, but good as the basis for a sauce.

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I made my lobster stock with leftover rose prosecco and a splash of some really good dry vermouth, plus aromatics. Took awhile to get to simmer but once it did I think I simmered for 45 minutes? Fifteen just seems way too short, but I've also gone far too long in the past with the result being a funky off flavor.

Question: Now that I've strained the shells and solids off and dumped them, can I simmer the stock again to reduce it without harm?

I have -- but I simmered the stock for a full hour, too, which is what I do with shrimp heads. I thought the warning about 15 minutes was only for fish, not shellfish, but I'm sure someone has an authoritative answer and explanation.

I thought this too--I do fish fumet for 30 minutes max and I do shrimp stock quickly too because there doesn't seem to be a point in going longer. I haven't detected any off flavors off of an hour simmer with lobster shells, but I'd definitely hesitate to go any longer.

nunc est bibendum...

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If you think you'll be doing lots of lobster, you might want to get Jasper White's Lobster at Home cookbook.

I made his Rich Lobster Stock for the holidays, which involved roasting a whole bunch of lobster carcasses and simmering them for an hour with lots of other stuff including fennel and tomatoes and and a whole bottle of white wine! Took forever to make, but now I have 5 quarts of the stuff in nice 1 cup portions in the freezer.

We started off with Lobster Newburg on Toast Points for Christmas Dinner -- it was heavenly! Of course, you start collecting more lobster bodies and bits for the next round of stock in the freezer with every recipe you make using the current batch of stock...it never ends.

There's also a "simpler" recipe for Quick Stock that doesn't involve roasting the lobster bodies. It also leaves out the tomatoes, which I think makes it more appropriate for many recipes.

It's an excellent, authoritative book to have in your collection -- let's make 2009 the Year of the Lobster!

- L.

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We just enjoyed that lobster roe/tomalley butter I made on top of roasted oysters in the shell and on baked potatoes. I have never eaten as many rich foods in one week as I have the past one ...

I need to take a picture of it before it's gone. The butter itself has a pink hue with flecks of green parsley and brilliant individual lobster eggs. Mmmmmm ...

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We took a trip to Nova Scotia in July for a family reunion.  We brought back about 1.5lbs of lobster meat.  I froze it while we were at the hotel, and its been sitting in my deep freeze ever since.

What can I make that will be edible?  I was originally thinking of a lobster pot pie, but I dont want anything that heavy.  Could I use it for a lighter pasta?  A pizza maybe?  Lobster is on sale this week for 8.99lb so if I needed more, I could get it.

Like 6ppc says, leftover lobster is an excellent sub for crab cakes. Or Chowder.

Frankly, leftover lobster is unusual for me. You must've had your fill of lobster on that trip. :wink:

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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At a famous restaurant in Paris they often take the left over lobster meat that is not used in the big plates like the little feet and some of the meat from the head, mix it with mayonaise and some tabasco, salt pepper. slice smoked salmon in very thin long sheets and tile them on top of one another, place the lobster meat in the middle and roll the salmon around the lobster meat. to create almost a sushi-like lobster roll. serve with a nice vinaigrette spiked with dill or a pesto. it's a delicious way to use those left over lobster pieces.

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We took a trip to Nova Scotia in July for a family reunion.  We brought back about 1.5lbs of lobster meat.  I froze it while we were at the hotel, and its been sitting in my deep freeze ever since.

What can I make that will be edible?  I was originally thinking of a lobster pot pie, but I dont want anything that heavy.  Could I use it for a lighter pasta?  A pizza maybe?  Lobster is on sale this week for 8.99lb so if I needed more, I could get it.

Like 6ppc says, leftover lobster is an excellent sub for crab cakes. Or Chowder.

Frankly, leftover lobster is unusual for me. You must've had your fill of lobster on that trip. :wink:

We did!! We had that lobster roll tasting with you and previous to that, we had that family lobster dinner at the firehall in Cape Breton. We each got two 2lb lobsters. I was full after the first one.

Here is what I did with the leftover meat. It was amazing. I defrosted the leftover meat and tossed it with the fra diavolo sauce( san marzano chopped tomatoes in the sauce )

gallery_25969_665_505924.jpg

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