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Pourable ganache for Buche is separating! Help!


zenpup
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Have just made the pourable ganache for a Buche de Noel from François Payard's Book "Simply Sensational Desserts" using El Rey Gran Saman Bittersweet 71% chocolate and pasteurized (not ultra) organic heavy cream from Whole Foods.

Brought the cream to a boil, removed from the heat and stirred in the finely chopped chocolate. Looked fine for a minute and then separated into floating oil and slightly granular chocolate.

Proportions: 312g chocolate, 290g heavy cream

The saucepan was dry to begin (no water), and the silicone spatula was dry too.

I have made this many times, but with Callebaut...never with the El Rey. Never had a problem before...always smooth and beautiful.

Any thoughts? Rescuable? Was the cream still too hot?

Thanks for any help! Am heading out to buy more chocolate...

Oh, and I wanted to add...the chocolate was in a metal bowl and I poured the boiling cream over it...and I do have a stick blender and will try that.

Edited by zenpup (log)

I'd rather be making cheese; growing beets or smoking briskets.

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Do you have a stick blender? That might pull it back together.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I'd go with John's suggestion above, adding a little cold milk while you do it. I always use a stick blender or food processor when making a dark chocolate ganache to help prevent splitting.

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A couple of things to consider.

If your ganache "breaks" immersion blending is one of very few things that will probably save it.

For me, as a chef, having an assistant pour the chopped chocolate into boiling cream always resulted in a greasy mess, with the cocoa butter separating out, all of that business.

Pouring the cream onto the chopped or pistole/feve style choc that's in a bowl, covering with plastic for maybe 5 or 10 minutes then immersion blending will give you a result that will make you smile!

Lastly, I've said on these boards before, that IMO, El Rey is a VERY tempermental chocolate, not easy to work with.

So, why not forget about guessing reformulations/rewriting recipes and use a dependable chocolate like Valrhona Caribe/ An E.Guittard ( High End Line) or Cocoa Berry choc like Favorite Mi Amer,etc.

Vary degrees of expense but all dependable and forgiving.

Best to you, hope all works out!

Edited by tan319 (log)

2317/5000

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If you are adding a fairly high proportion of cream to chocolate - like for a thinner ganache for pouring - I find it helps to pour only about half of the cream over the chocolate and whisk until melted, then whisk in the rest of the cream. If you add too much cream all at once, sometimes you don't get a nice emulsion, but it looks sort of granular and like the chocolate is not completely melted.

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If you are adding a fairly high proportion of cream to chocolate  - like for a thinner ganache for pouring  - I find it helps to pour only about half of the cream over the chocolate and whisk until melted, then whisk in the rest of the cream.  If you add too much cream all at once, sometimes you don't get a nice emulsion, but it looks sort of granular and like the chocolate is not completely melted.

Yes, many advise adding in two, sometimes three additions.

As I wrote above, I've found adding my cream to choc in a bowl, covering with plastic, giving bowl a light shake to make sure all choc is covered with cream and letting sit for a good five, ten minutes.

Then when you whisk, you'll get a nice emulsion, usually no need for immersion blend, no unmelted pieces.

If you have a grainy or granular, greasy finish, you've "scalded" or burnt the chocolate.

From the fat in the cream .

2317/5000

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