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Single Shrimp Amuse Bouche


StanSherman
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To start a small Christmas dinner I was thinking of a single shrimp with a glass of champagne.

Two of the people are in their 80’s and won’t go for sushi or raw.  What way would you prepare the perfect shrimp?

How big are they?

The shrimp, that is.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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And how formal is the dinner? Can you do a shrimp-on-a-toothpick-type thing, or is that too gauche?

Not formal, just loved ones who we want to treat well.

What is the rest of the dinner? It's hard to go wrong with shrimp wrapped in bacon (maybe with a miso glaze or something along those lines), but that's a pretty big flavor to kick off the meal with.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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What is the rest of the dinner? It's hard to go wrong with shrimp wrapped in bacon (maybe with a miso glaze or something along those lines), but that's a pretty big flavor to kick off the meal with.

So far:

Schramsberg Blanc de Noirs 2002 with a perfect single shrimp

Caesar salad

Prime Rib w Horseradish foam

Steele Stymie Merlot

Green Onion-Parmesan Popovers

Brussels Sprouts with Shallots

White Chocolate-Raspberry Crème Brûlée

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How about a shot glass of gazpacho with a shrimp on the rim...its a little summery but I wouldn't complain :smile:

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

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My most popular shrimp amuse involves a shrimp set in a dollop of pineapple puree on a thin slice of green plantain cooked in butter until soft through and caramelized on the bottom. A pinch of sea salt on the plantain on one side of the shrimp and a pinch of cayenne on the other side, dust the shrimp with spray dried coconut milk and top with a strand of grated ginger, a strand of grated lime zest, a strand of mint leaf, a strand of basil leaf and a piece of cilantro root. Nothing particularly innovative but people seem to like them... never served them with champagne though.

Edit: Ok, more information surfaced while I was typing. This won't really fit the menu.

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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So far:

Schramsberg Blanc de Noirs 2002 with a perfect single shrimp

Caesar salad

Prime Rib w Horseradish foam

Steele Stymie Merlot

Green Onion-Parmesan Popovers

Brussels Sprouts with Shallots

White Chocolate-Raspberry Crème Brûlée

Looks like a pretty classic menu so I might suggest starting with a Shrimp Bisque-a different take on the "perfect shrimp" dish but one that is warm, satisfying and fits within your menu. And it's probably a surprise to a lot of guests these days to see soup served at a meal-harkens back to the days when soups were more a part of home menus. And shrimp bisque is delicious with champagne.

I make a somewhat complicated recipe that involves cooking shrimp shells with vegetables, deglazing with brandy and then slow simmering with tomato paste and shrimp stock. There are a couple of stages of straining and a final thickening with butter and flour, but the results are worth it.

If you don't want to go to all that trouble, Whole Foods usually sells shrimp bisque. You could garnish the soup with a poached shrimp and serve with buttered toast points and flutes of champagne.

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Looks like a pretty classic menu so I might suggest starting with a Shrimp Bisque-a different take on the "perfect shrimp" dish but one that is warm, satisfying and fits within your menu.  And it's probably a surprise to a lot of guests these days to see soup served at a meal-harkens back to the days when soups were more a part of home menus.  And shrimp bisque is delicious with champagne.

I make a somewhat complicated recipe that involves cooking shrimp shells with vegetables, deglazing with brandy and then slow simmering with tomato paste and shrimp stock.  There are a couple of stages of straining and a final thickening with butter and flour, but the results are worth it. 

If you don't want to go to all that trouble, Whole Foods usually sells shrimp bisque.  You could garnish the soup with a poached shrimp and serve with buttered toast points and flutes of champagne.

I do have the perfect service for this idea. I have a bronze patina tree with birds holding small 2 oz cups with tea lights under as warmers. I've done a similar lobster bisque with saffron added.

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Looks like a delicious selection of "classics"—I think a bacon-wrapped shrimp with some kind of glaze would fit the theme well. But, of course, I'm a sucker for bacon...

She's going to want bacon for breakfast the next morning, but I agree on the pairing. I'm getting ready to do a big batch so we'll save the bacon dishes for Valentines day.

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Looks like a pretty classic menu so I might suggest starting with a Shrimp Bisque-a different take on the "perfect shrimp" dish but one that is warm, satisfying and fits within your menu.  And it's probably a surprise to a lot of guests these days to see soup served at a meal-harkens back to the days when soups were more a part of home menus.  And shrimp bisque is delicious with champagne.

I make a somewhat complicated recipe that involves cooking shrimp shells with vegetables, deglazing with brandy and then slow simmering with tomato paste and shrimp stock.  There are a couple of stages of straining and a final thickening with butter and flour, but the results are worth it. 

If you don't want to go to all that trouble, Whole Foods usually sells shrimp bisque.  You could garnish the soup with a poached shrimp and serve with buttered toast points and flutes of champagne.

I do have the perfect service for this idea. I have a bronze patina tree with birds holding small 2 oz cups with tea lights under as warmers. I've done a similar lobster bisque with saffron added.

You could serve the bisque in shot glasses as well with the shrimp skewered on top.

You could also make some cheesy grits, spread them in a hotel pan till cool and set up. Cut out in rounds with a biscuit cutter and sear in a pan on both sides till crispy. Serve the shrimp on top with a tomato like relish or a sauce of rosemary, worchestire, veal stock and garlic.....just a thought ;)

Edited by chickenfriedgourmet (log)
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Over in this topic I grappled with a very similar question. I ended up making these:

gallery_19804_437_20836.jpg

That's Maine shrimp that have been gently blanched, with a "gremolata" of minced kaffir lime leaf, shallot, white pepper, and thai basil, a simple pickle made from long strings of cucumber, and some alaea salt on top for saline and contrast.

Chris Amirault

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Being a single shrimp and launching your meal, it probably needs a bit of a wow factor.

Christine Manfield gave a recipe in "The Cook's Book" for noodle-wrapped deep-fried shrimp.

Prepare the shrimp by peeling but leaving on tail section (as a handle).

Basically you take fresh thin egg noodles, boil them for two minutes and then wrap them around the pre-seasoned shrimp. This is then deep fried for 3 minutes at 350 degrees.

The outcome is visually appealing, has a bit of crunch outside and the firm shrimp texture inside.

Serve it with some sweet chili sauce for an Asian touch or, probably more appropriate to your menu and guests, with a sauce Andelouse (ie. cocktail sauce) for a more conventional touch.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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Being a single shrimp and launching your meal, it probably needs a bit of a wow factor.

Christine Manfield gave a recipe in "The Cook's Book" for noodle-wrapped deep-fried shrimp.

Prepare the shrimp by peeling but leaving on tail section (as a handle).

Basically you take fresh thin egg noodles, boil them for two minutes and then wrap them around the pre-seasoned shrimp. This is then deep fried for 3 minutes at 350 degrees.

The outcome is visually appealing, has a bit of crunch outside and the firm shrimp texture inside.

Serve it with some sweet chili sauce for an Asian touch or, probably more appropriate to your menu and guests, with a sauce Andelouse (ie. cocktail sauce) for a more conventional touch.

How about Shrimp wrapped in a spanish ham with a thin slice of apple and manchego cheese skewered over the glass of champagne....trust me it should go together http://www.foodpairing.be/FoodPairable.aspx?f=Champagne you could juice a granny smith apple and marinate the shrimp in it, grill with salt and pepper, wrap in ham and place a thinly sliced piece of manchego cheese around it, skewer and serve

Edited by chickenfriedgourmet (log)
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You could also make some cheesy grits, spread them in a hotel pan till cool and set up. Cut out in rounds with a biscuit cutter and sear in a pan on both sides till crispy. Serve the shrimp on top with a tomato like relish or a sauce of rosemary, worchestire, veal stock and garlic.....just a thought ;)

I have done similar with a fried cheese grits round topped with one shrimp on a thin disk of sausage. Hide the toothpick in a green onion brush and it is sort of a shrimp and grits amuse.

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Given your menu:

Classic Jumbo Shrimp cocktail.

I only suggest this cause a) It's VERY opulent (assuming big enough shrimp) and b) is made ahead of time. Take jumbo-extra-colossal shrimp, brine for a couple of hours in salt and a little sugar, broil on both sides then chill. You would need U10 shrimp for this, U6 if you have big eaters. Serve with a slice of lemon and store bought cocktail sauce with fresh horseradish mixed in.

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An Adaptation of Robuchon's langostine in filo... (langostin cigar)

So take one sheet of Filo,

One Basil Leaf

Salt and Pepper

1 shrimp tail.

Wrap the basil leaf vein side up around the shrimp. Take the filo and cut into rectangles about 3 inches by 3 inches. you can leave the tail on, in which case wrap all but the tail in the filo, crimp the ends. or if you take the tail off, well im sure you can figure it out. eggwash the filo before frying. Fry at 375 to 400 until brown.

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I like the bisque idea, maybe instead of a big cup of bisque, have a shot of creamy bisque and a giant shrimp, so the bisque is almost like a dipping sauce for the shrimp? That way you get all the creamy flavor and richness without filling people up too much. And it should go nicely with the champagne.

:biggrin: Pam

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I like SeanDirty's idea of the Robuchon variant... but one of the things that makes the Robuchon dish so great is that he uses (or used to use - I haven't had it in a while) bric pastry, rather than filo - it winds up a bit crisper, and doesn't fall apart... it may be hard to find the bric dough if you don't have a middle eastern or indian market around... Also, Robuchon serves it with a relatively thick basil puree for dipping...

Another idea (if you want to knock off a great restaurant theme) is from Le Bernardin from a few years ago - they did a great shrimp ravioli - in the ravioli is the shrimp, duxelle of wild mushrooms, and served with a foie gras truffle butter sauce... it's freaking crazy good - but it's expensive to make... Eric Ripert puts the basic recipe in his book "A Return to Cooking" but he does it with crawfish rather than shrimp...

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  • 5 months later...

I regularly do multi-course shrimp-truck dinners, and like to start off with a single grilled jumbo shrimp. Shrimp wrapped in bacon is a stand-by, but lately I've been serving the shrimp with a single accompanying flavor.

Two days ago I served one shrimp with a not-very-sweet mango-apricot marmalade, and then another with a brushing of vanilla cream and a drop of Marie Sharp's hot sauce.

Lots of things work: pepper jelly, chesnut cream with a bit of hot sauce, mole. I tend to cook up a few shrimp, cut them in pieces, and play around with whatever's in the fridge.

Bruce

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It all depends on the quality of the shrimp. If it is of top quality and flavorful, then let it shine with a simple grilling in the shell with the head still on (preferably). If not of the very best quality, any of the above or other enhancements would work well.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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