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Jaymes

Which knife for Christmas

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Do you have a link saying the Santoku is double bevelled? I don't remember reading about that anywhere.

It says right there in the description that it's a double-beveled knife:

http://www.kershawknives.com/productdetail...=328&brand=shun

Unique, single-sided blade design (with exception of Nakiri and Santoku; both double-bevel blades)

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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An 8 inch Fibrox (Vicorinox) chef's knife. It is very utilitarian, is not as expensive (19.22 at Amazon) as Henkels, etc. and is highly rated in several reviews that I have seen. You can spend some more and get him the rosewood handle version and it will still be much less than Henkels,etc.


Tom Gengo

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I would recommend throwing in a copy of Chad's new book, the one that made Slate's top 10 books of 2008. For Christmas I sent one to my nephew who just treated himself to his first set of good knives, he bought Wusthof.

I am thinking of treating myself to that nakiri also. I have never used one and before spending big bucks, it would be worthwhile to see how much I would use it.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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An 8 inch Fibrox (Vicorinox) chef's knife.  It is very utilitarian, is not as expensive (19.22 at Amazon) as Henkels, etc. and is highly rated in several reviews that I have seen.  You can spend some more and get him the rosewood handle version and it will still be much less than Henkels,etc.

I concur with the Victorinox. It was rated the #1 Chef's knife by Cook's Illustrated a few years ago. I bought one for a "xmas auction" random gift, and its pretty nice. Well balanced, and it has a fibrox handle, which would probably hold up if it accidentally got thrown into the dishwasher (something a single male would probably do at least once). Save the money you'd spend on a more expensive knife and get a Victorinox paring knife to match it, I just got two for other gifts for $4.99 each at Amazon.

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I would recommend throwing in a copy of Chad's new book...

Chad's book and a gift certificate (korin? epicurean ege? some place local to him?) would be brilliant.


Notes from the underbelly

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I can't really argue with the suggestion of the fibrox. If I was starting all over again, I'd probably go with a cleaver. Dexter, Town Food service and CCK all make excellent chef's cleavers that can be had for <$40.

But what do I know.

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Probably too late (not many shopping days left), but for someone new to higher quality knives, I would go with either Forschner or Wusthof Classic. I have a collection of Japanese knives myself, but most of these are typically made with a harder steel, meaning more difficult to sharpen for the novice/beginner. Although the Togiharu is a fantastic knife for the price, and utilizes a softer steel, the only reason why I would not place this at the top of the list for someone relatively new to knives is due to the lack of a bolster (of course many stamped or cheaper knives don't have one as well). I think many folks prefer this for comfort and grip.

Wusthof and Forschner are made with a slightly softer steel, making them easier to sharpen, yet they are still very high quality knives. 8" is a good starter size.

One note: the Wusthof classic line looks a lot sexier than the Forschner. It's a forged blade compared to Forschners stamped. don't get me wrong, Forschner is a fantastic knife, just utilitarian though.

All of this is IMHO

Happy holidays all!


Edited by dougery (log)

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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So what did you end up deciding on? What is that lucky lad getting from his generous auntie? Are you going to include a copy of Chad's book for him to learn about use and care of good cutlery?


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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So what did you end up deciding on?  What is that lucky lad getting from his generous auntie?  Are you going to include a copy of Chad's book for him to learn about use and care of good cutlery?

Did also get him a copy of Chad's book.

And not tellin' which knife I selected. I so very, very much appreciate all the info that folks took the time to post here, so don't want anyone to think that their efforts were for naught.

:rolleyes:


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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So what did you end up deciding on?  What is that lucky lad getting from his generous auntie?  Are you going to include a copy of Chad's book for him to learn about use and care of good cutlery?

Did also get him a copy of Chad's book.

And not tellin' which knife I selected. I so very, very much appreciate all the info that folks took the time to post here, so don't want anyone to think that their efforts were for naught.

:rolleyes:

I think we're all mature enough not to be insulted if you didnt pick the knife we reccomended. I for one would like to know what you selected.

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And not tellin' which knife I selected.  I so very, very much appreciate all the info that folks took the time to post here, so don't want anyone to think that their efforts were for naught.

Wow, really? Thanks for saving me the months of therapy I surely would've had to endure. :rolleyes:


Edited by Octaveman (log)

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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:laugh::laugh::laugh:

So, are y'all saying I should lighten up?

I did get him a copy of Chad's book, and took this paragraph of Chad's advice:

"For a $20-25 budget, there is the Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox-handled chef's knife. Unlike many stamped knives, this one comes with decent geometry and pretty good steel. It's a great starter knife or one to stock your beach/lake cabin so you don't have to take your expensive knives. I like them. Cook's Illustrated loves them. They're good knives."

But I do again want to thank everybody that contributed advice.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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:laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:

So, are y'all saying I should lighten up?

I did get him a copy of Chad's book, and took this paragraph of Chad's advice:

"For a $20-25 budget, there is the Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox-handled chef's knife. Unlike many stamped knives, this one comes with decent geometry and pretty good steel. It's a great starter knife or one to stock your beach/lake cabin so you don't have to take your expensive knives. I like them. Cook's Illustrated loves them. They're good knives."

But I do again want to thank everybody that contributed advice.

Oh goodie, I actually recommended it before Chad did!! I'm happy ( and immature). LOL

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:laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:

So, are y'all saying I should lighten up?

I did get him a copy of Chad's book, and took this paragraph of Chad's advice:

"For a $20-25 budget, there is the Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox-handled chef's knife. Unlike many stamped knives, this one comes with decent geometry and pretty good steel. It's a great starter knife or one to stock your beach/lake cabin so you don't have to take your expensive knives. I like them. Cook's Illustrated loves them. They're good knives."

But I do again want to thank everybody that contributed advice.

Oh goodie, I actually recommended it before Chad did!! I'm happy ( and immature). LOL

I have to admit that the low price was a factor, especially since I decided to get the book, too. And while I do love my nephew, I also have four kids and their assorted wives/husbands, and my grandkids to buy for.

It all adds up, y'know.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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**************

I did get him a copy of Chad's book, and took this paragraph of Chad's advice:

"For a $20-25 budget, there is the Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox-handled chef's knife. Unlike many stamped knives, this one comes with decent geometry and pretty good steel. It's a great starter knife or one to stock your beach/lake cabin so you don't have to take your expensive knives. I like them. Cook's Illustrated loves them. They're good knives."

**************

That's a good combination...and a practical one for someone who may or may not understand knives well enough yet to take care of it. You will not shed any tears if your nephew or a room mate decide to use it as a pry bar...or let it rust in a sink...or crash around in a drawer. But it should provide good service for years if all goes well.

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the coment that threw me was that a Wusthof Knife can not be sharpened. they sell a Wusthof knife sharpener for $20, and it works great. th

Based on what I read here, I just picked up a Togiharu Molybdenum Sante problem that you might be running into  is that every time you use a good knife you need to runn it on a sharpening steel a few time.  the sharpening steel does NOT sharpen it straightens the edge of the knife that is rounded everytime that you use it.  if you do this, everytime that you use the knife, then you should only have to sharpen the knife every 7 months, for the average home cook.  and for storage, dont put them in a drawer, the blades will bend,  and a wooden knife block harbors many nasty bacteria,  i would suggest a magnet.

Chef

oku. Thanks for the the suggestion, I have now bought myself a small Christmas present.

I know what you mean!! I'm really tempted myself.

But most of all, I want to thank everybody that offered their thoughts and opinions. I just knew I could count on you.

Now, armed with these suggestions, I'm going to figure out which one will be just right.

Thanks again!

:rolleyes:


Tell me what you eat, and i will tell you what you are!

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:laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:

So, are y'all saying I should lighten up?

I did get him a copy of Chad's book, and took this paragraph of Chad's advice:

"For a $20-25 budget, there is the Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox-handled chef's knife. Unlike many stamped knives, this one comes with decent geometry and pretty good steel. It's a great starter knife or one to stock your beach/lake cabin so you don't have to take your expensive knives. I like them. Cook's Illustrated loves them. They're good knives."

But I do again want to thank everybody that contributed advice.

Not a bad choice at all. I have several Tramontina knives sold as commercial cutlery including a Santuko. They sharpen up nice and work real well.

The book is a great start as well.

Any knife will serve you if kept sharp. Direct him to those sections of the book and you might have some ideas for next Christmass.

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:laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh:

So, are y'all saying I should lighten up?

I did get him a copy of Chad's book, and took this paragraph of Chad's advice:

"For a $20-25 budget, there is the Forschner/Victorinox Fibrox-handled chef's knife. Unlike many stamped knives, this one comes with decent geometry and pretty good steel. It's a great starter knife or one to stock your beach/lake cabin so you don't have to take your expensive knives. I like them. Cook's Illustrated loves them. They're good knives."

But I do again want to thank everybody that contributed advice.

Not a bad choice at all. I have several Tramontina knives sold as commercial cutlery including a Santuko. They sharpen up nice and work real well.

The book is a great start as well.

Any knife will serve you if kept sharp. Direct him to those sections of the book and you might have some ideas for next Christmass.

Ha! You're right! Giving someone a "hobby" solves the gift-giving dilemma for years!


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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