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French Holiday Cocktails


Abra
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I posted a bunch of holiday cocktail recipes from a current issue of a popular French cooking magazine here.  You guys might be interested, and if you aren't, I don't know who would be!

Well, I was very interested to read them. And having read them, I can say they certainly sound, uh, interesting. But I'm not sure I'll be whipping any of them up any time soon.

And yet, they somehow seem familiar, like something that my French-Canadian grandmother would approve of as appropriate holiday cocktails. Maybe it's the wanton, over-the-top inclusion of "exotic" ingredients. (Fresh *and* canned litchis? Lemongrass and pomegranates with yet more litchis?)

What's the alcoholic equivalent of cuisine a la grand-mere?

- Laura Letourneau Chalifoux

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Thanks for the interesting list, Abra!

I was looking through it to see if I found something to serve as a festive apero for a dinner party this weekend. I was looking at the Champagne/Honey/Cointreau combo. But, once I starting working through the logistics of that recipe in my head, I'm not sure it's the best plan.

They suggest dissolving the honey into the cointreau and then adding the champagane - in an amount that would serve six. This means you'll be pouring the champagne out into something else and giving it a good mix. Seems to me that it would be better to create these individual in the flutes to keep your bubbles fresh. I might give it a little try and will report back if it results in something nice.

52 martinis blog

@52martinis

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Forest, that's just what I would do - add the syrup to the flutes and then pour in the Champagne, as for a kir royale. I don't get why they think you should do it in a pitcher, but I'd ignore that part.

I know just what you mean, Lapin, they're endearingly retro.

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The staying power of the bubbles is underrated; you can mix them in a pitcher without killing it; I've done this several times with punches involving sparkling wine.

Yes, I did have the same thought that it could be similar to a punch involving sparkling wine, which I'd have problem tossing the wine into. but, I'm with Abra on the one-at-a-time for these. In this case - serving 6 & such a simple recipe - it would be just as easy to make them individually and I think they would be better. Bubbly fizzy champagne is nice and festive and the presentation of pouring it out of my old water pitcher isn't quite as fun as topping up each guest up as they arrive. While I'm sure a side by side comparison wouldn't result in a HUGE difference in taste, I feel like there really isn't much more work to make it slightly better.

52 martinis blog

@52martinis

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Do it in the flute if you prefer, but I'd for sure pre-mix the honey & Cointreau.

Otherwise you won't get the combined flavors since there won't be much mixing in a flute.

Suspect this is why the original recipe was the way it was.

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