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Question on Salted Duck Egg Yolk


warlockdilemma
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How does one get that bright orange yolk on Salted Duck eggs?

I cook mine on the rice cooker with rice.....results always vary.....sometimes I get that bright orange yolk,but most times it is a pale dull yellow(more like a boiled egg yolk)....Is there a certain cooking time or method to get that perfect cooked yolk or it depends on the quality of the salted egg?

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We get duck eggs in the spring, and the yolks are consistently a deep yellow. They're from the same farm and possibly from the same ducks. The egg lady says it's mostly their diet that colors the yolk.

I've had duck eggs at a Filipino restaurant that have been cured with salt. The shells were red and the yolks were rich and orange. Very tasty.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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  • 1 year later...

I received a box of salted duck eggs from my principal as part of our Dragonboat festival gifts. How should I use them? Someone suggested in a congee, but we're not big congee fans in my house. One of my other co-workers suggested in a salad with tomatoes, which I might try. Any other ideas?

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I received a box of salted duck eggs from my principal as part of our Dragonboat festival gifts. How should I use them?

1. Boil, peel, slice and eat.

2. Mix raw with chicken eggs and water (about equal portion). Steam the mixture custard for 20 min or so.

3. Use the salted duck egg yolk to make "golden shrimp"... smash the yolk... smear on raw shrimp (with shell on)... dip in batter... deep-fry. Kind of like a shrimp tempura.

4. Mix salted duck eggs with century eggs (cut in cubes) and stir-fry with spinach. (Stir-fry spinach first. Stir-fry the salted duck eggs separately. Mix in century egg cubes at the end. Then pour on top of spinach.

... many other uses...

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Sounds good! But the eggs I have have already been boiled, so I should have posted that I'd received the boiled kind, sorry. I didn't know you could get salted raw ones.

This rules out the custard and stir-frying them. Would they go well crumbled over stir-fried leafy greens, you think?

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Would they go well crumbled over stir-fried leafy greens, you think?

I think it would be fine.

Boiled salted egg yolks are also used as filling for some Cantonese dim sum (or small eats): like nor mai gai (glutenous rice wrapped in lotus leaves), joong (glutenous rice wrapped in bamboo leaves).

The salty part is the egg white, not the yolk.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Or just use the boiled salted eggs as the protein part of your meal along with steamed rice and a dish of vegetables.

With uncooked salted eggs, I sometimes cook them in their shell along with the rice.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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If those salted eggs are anything like the ones I remember from my childhood dinners, they are seriously salty. Don't think of them as eggs, but as a salty garnish, condiment, or seasoning. My parents regularly served them with steamed pork and/or plenty of rice. The blandness of the meat or rice tempered the saltiness of the eggs.

My mother in particular liked to put those salted eggs in a steamed pork cake. Now that's serious peasant food, usually not served in Chinese restaurants. To make a steamed pork cake, combine some ground or well-chopped pork with ginger, garlic, soy (not too much), chopped scallions, chopped shittake mushrooms, chopped water chestnuts, and then anything else you think would taste good. All the vegs should be finely chopped. (My parents used cleavers. I reach for the food processor.) Tuck some salted duck egg quarters into the pork, covering them up--not too much duck eggs--remember they will help salt the pork. Smooth the mixture into one big patty in a dish, and steam until the pork is cooked. Serve with plenty of steamed rice.

You could also make a chicken stirfry over steamed rice, and garnish the plate with a couple quarters of salted duck eggs.

Once, in Kasma's Thai cooking class, we were making Son-In-Law eggs, and we made some Son-In-Law eggs with salted duck eggs. Those salty Son-In-Law eggs weren't half-bad, though I prefer fresh boiled duck eggs for that dish.

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Instead of congee, you could put them in a tofu "salad". Just mix a block of tofu (I think soft tofu works better) with the eggs, maybe toss in some dried shrimp. I usually do this with century eggs, but salted eggs work just as well.

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How does one get that bright orange yolk on Salted Duck eggs?

I cook mine on the rice cooker with rice.....results always vary.....sometimes I get that bright orange yolk,but most times it is a pale dull yellow(more like a boiled egg yolk)....Is there a certain cooking time or method to get that perfect cooked yolk or it depends on the quality of the salted egg?

I boil mine for 10 mins in a pan never the rice cooker. The yolks always turn out perfectly for me.

I cooked Prawns with salted duck eggs recently, a variation of hzrt8w's "golden shrimp". Boil a couple of eggs, cut them open and scoop out the yolks and lightly smash them (eat the whites separately if you want a salt fix). Cover prawns in starch and deep fry till semi done, set aside. In a little oil (a scant tablespoon) gently fry the yolks, they will magically dissolve into a paste. Add the prawns, increase the heat and coat with the salted egg yolk sauce. The prawns should be slightly crispy and very rich tasting.

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