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Non-stick cooking sprays


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When greasing pans etc.. do you go for traditional butter or a non stick vegetable spray.

I use a tasteless non stick spray for those things that have a real tendency to stick , but many times I will still grease and flour the traditional way. My Bundt pan I always use the non stick spray.. ( and it's a non stick pan!! )

I am terrified of things getting stuck in it with all those lovely curves.

If you use a non stick spray, what brand ?

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I have two of these:

misto.jpg

You can fill them with anything you want and you just pump them up a few times in order to generate air pressure. No propellants or preservatives or anything like that. Right now I've got olive oil in one and grapeseed oil in the other. Not that I use them very much. It's just as easy to put a little oil in a pan and spread it around with a piece of paper towel.

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I have a few of these. The oil's probably gone bad in them by now, I use them so seldomly.

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Oh, I use mine very often. One with olive, one with canola. More for sautéeing and grilling than baking. Then I do the butter/flour thing.

I recently found out that some of those pan-release sprays have a lot of WATER in them -- so actually they'll have the opposite effect from what you want. Read the label carefully! :shock:

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I go through 2 cases of crisco pan release a week. I couple it with quilon bparchment sheets. The crisco is *very* neutral in flavor and for some reason works better than pam.

FG is right, for a home cook a paper towel and your choice of fat works fine

I do a lot more than most people and I'd be filling a misto 50+ times a day.

I have a misto and use it for spraying oil on salads.

Nick

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One thing that the commercial non-stick sprays have all over those pump'n-spray oil canisters (when used in baking) is the inclusion of Lecithin. Nothing, I mean nothing is going to stick with lecithin. In fact, lately I've been using a product called "Cake Release" from Wilton. It's a yellow, flavorless liquid that you brush on the pan like melted butter and contains several typed of oils, corn flour and lecithin. Way more non-stick than butter.

By the way, lecithin is derived naturally from soy beans and is used to emulsify chocolate. It can also be good for you.

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The problem with the commercial sprays is they eventually build up on sprayed surfaces, in my experience. They're hard to fully clean from pots and pans. I think it might be the lecithin that does this, actually. I use a Misto on most pots and pans if needed for this reason. I keep a can of Mazola nonstick corn oil spray that I use exclusively on my cheep tabletop hibachi. I don't care if I get a stubborn film on the grate of that thing.

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When I worked in a big pastry shop, we used to grease pans with a paint sprayer filled with some German grease. We also used the sprayer to butter sandwiches. I think I inhaled enough oil on a daily basis to fry calamari.

:blink:

At home I butter and flour, or use Pam when I'm lazy. My Misto broke about a week after I bought it. :rolleyes:

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The problem with the commercial sprays is they eventually build up on sprayed surfaces, in my experience. They're hard to fully clean from pots and pans. I think it might be the lecithin that does this, actually. I use a Misto on most pots and pans if needed for this reason. I keep a can of Mazola nonstick corn oil spray that I use exclusively on my cheep tabletop hibachi. I don't care if I get a stubborn film on the grate of that thing.

Perhaps, but I've yet to see a buildup on sheetpans. The commercial sprays also help the quilon sheets along.

Re buildup: You should see the glaze buildup on a large heavily used grill from the olive oil in fiorentina marinades.

One thing that I've found the sprays invaluable for (and I thank nightscotsman for a possible explanation) is grilled fish or turkey burgers.

No matter how hot my cast iron grates are, fish will occasionally stick. Turkey Burgers invariably. Spraying the cooking surface of the *food* to be cooked works wonders. The sprays work much better than wiping oil or butter, which people perceive as sullying the so-called fat-free/reduced calorie, nature of these foods. This isn't to say that they are superior in all uses. Just that, as with any tool, they have their *best* application. These are some of the things that I've found them useful for.

Nick

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  • 5 years later...
This probably belongs in a whole new thread, but what uses other than the obvious have you put your Mistos to? And I do mean in the kitchen! I actually stumbled onto a forum where they were loading their misters with arometherapy oils or something.  :rolleyes:

Well...you could use your Misto to recreate El Bulli's candied-lemon-peels-with-margarita-mist "cocktail". :smile:

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Since we now oil a lot of pans a day, I buy depanning oil by the 16L, but I used to make my own from canola oil and liquid lecithin which I bought at a health food store. The only problem was that straight lecithin is kind of a messy substance which stains dreadfully if slopped on anything. I also mixed up pan goop with it (flour, oil and lecithin). Don't use a Misto however ... never found one that worked for me, although I like the idea. Susan

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Don't use a Misto however ... never found one that worked for me, although I like the idea. Susan

You and me both ! I've had three of them, and all of them clogged up within the first month or two, to the point where they never actually *sprayed*, they just sorta, erm, (piddled) the oil out. When they did spray I loved them, but I sort of expected they'd work longer than a month or two. Maybe I didn't use them often enough, I dunno.

I tried rinsing the nozzle with boiling water, poking out the hole with a pin, you name it. No spray, just.....well, a piddle.

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Don't use a Misto however ... never found one that worked for me, although I like the idea. Susan

You and me both ! I've had three of them, and all of them clogged up within the first month or two, to the point where they never actually *sprayed*, they just sorta, erm, (piddled) the oil out. When they did spray I loved them, but I sort of expected they'd work longer than a month or two. Maybe I didn't use them often enough, I dunno.

I tried rinsing the nozzle with boiling water, poking out the hole with a pin, you name it. No spray, just.....well, a piddle.

Ya gotta fill em with HOT soapy water and pump em up and spray til dead. then rinse ,and fill with a bit of clean water and pump and spray a bit again to clean soapy water out. then refill w/ whatever, and then they will work for a couple months... Think I found that on their website...Works..

Bud

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  • 3 weeks later...

Having recalled a previous discussion on non-stick sprays causing non-stick pans to start sticking ("nordicware bundt pan--loses its non-stickiness?"), I just saw an ad in the latest Bon Appetit magazine for Pam Professional. It's a non-stick spray supposedly engineered for high heat cooking. They must be aware of the stories being bandied about regarding how their spray has been turning non-stick pans into sticking pans because they have printed on the Pam Professional label "resists residue buildup for easy cleanup". Of course, the key word here is "resists". :hmmm:

Has anyone tried this new non-stick spray yet?

edited to close the dang parenthesis

Edited by Toliver (log)

 

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When we are too lazy to pan pop corn, Kiddle sprays hers with olive oil to hold the salt. I don't salt my popped corn, I just douse it with hot sauce, so no spray stuff for me.

We also have one lone baking sheet saved solely for baking cookies, crackers, rutabegas and potatoes. This sheet is permanently coated with residue from olive oil spray. That stuff is impossible to clean off of baked surfaces.

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This probably belongs in a whole new thread, but what uses other than the obvious have you put your Mistos to? And I do mean in the kitchen! I actually stumbled onto a forum where they were loading their misters with arometherapy oils or something.  :rolleyes:

Well...you could use your Misto to recreate El Bulli's candied-lemon-peels-with-margarita-mist "cocktail". :smile:

Hmmm that's a thought. My hand-pump mister isn't actually a Misto, I got it at Crate & Barrell. Last week I made a batch of chocolate-tarragon gelato, loaded the mister with olive oil I'd infused with tarragon, and misted away.

I'm still looking for unconventional uses for an oil mister though, or at least something that would never occur to me :wink:

Again I realize this is slightly off-topic. Could anyone direct me to the proper thread? :biggrin:

JB

my website: MacGyver's Kitchen

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Having recalled a previous discussion on non-stick sprays causing non-stick pans to start sticking ("nordicware bundt pan--loses its non-stickiness?", I just saw an ad in the latest Bon Appetit magazine for Pam Professional. It's a non-stick spray supposedly engineered for high heat cooking. They must be aware of the stories being bandied about regarding how their spray has been turning non-stick pans into sticking pans because they have printed on the Pam Professional label "resists residue buildup for easy cleanup". Of course, the key word here is "resists". :hmmm:

Has anyone tried this new non-stick spray yet?

I believe the recent issue of Cook's Illustrated reviewed Pam Professional. I don't have the issue in front of me, but as others have indicated, I think it is the lecithin in most sprays that causes build-up. Instead, Pam Professional uses partially hydrogenated oils, i.e. trans fats, to stand up to the heat. Cooks Illustrated thought that when high heat was required, the small amounts of trans fats would not be of concern.

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I use Pam "Amateur" but only for making omelettes, which I have never consistently been able to get wholly unstuck out of the pan, despite trying many different techniques. I don't use non-stick pans, btw, because I'm worried that the frantic stirring will loosen the teflon, causing my eggs to taste funny or my alimentary canal to become non-stick, as well.

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I used Everbake from King Arthur's Flour for bread for years, but it built up on the bread pans and scrubbing and scrubbing and scrubbing did not remove it. I finally (sadly) tossed the grummy bread pans, bought new ones from King Arthur and have been using Pam Professional for the last few loaves of bread. It seems to work well, and the pans do not end up disgustingly (and uncleanably) sticky.

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