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Candying fruit, Wybauw's method


McAuliflower
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In my excitement over finding Wybauw's procedure for candying fruit (the two week sugar soaking process) I managed to not read his directions clearly until now.

...Now being when I have a dozen oranges sitting on my counter most eagerly.

Each step of the sugar soaking process indicates that I boil the sugar solution to a certain Brix point before proceeding.

How would a non-professional attempt this at home?

google's book preview shows the procedure here.

Help?

flavor floozy

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I think that you are going for degrees Baume, and yes, you prepare a sirop a trente, then in go the fruit, and each day you bring the pan of fruit & syrup to a boil for a set period of time, then remove it from the heat and let the syrup cool. The syrup should increase a certain number of degrees Baume each day for 10-14 days.

If you can lay hands on Passion for Chocolate by Bernachon, tr. is Rose Levy Beranbaum, she outlines the entire process for candied orange peel, in her usual very precise, clear manner.

Regards,

Theabroma

Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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In my excitement over finding Wybauw's procedure for candying fruit (the two week sugar soaking process) I managed to not read his directions clearly until now. 

...Now being when I have a dozen oranges sitting on my counter most eagerly.

Each step of the sugar soaking process indicates that I boil the sugar solution to a certain Brix point before proceeding.

How would a non-professional attempt this at home?

google's book preview shows the procedure here.

Help?

Unfortunately, I think you're really going to need a refractometer to measure the BRIX accurately. Sometimes you can pick one up on ebay. jbprince has them, too.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I'm sending you the Bernachon recipe by e-mail. If you follow the timing directions (start to time from a hard boil) your Brix are pretty close at the end.

You can get a refractometer on e-bay from Hong Kong for a reasonable price - look for the one for honey making.

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Ooo- thanks for the Bernachon recipe Kerry!

This answers my impatient needs to start on my Christmas food presents.

thank you everyone.

I'm gonna start on it today- without a refractometer... which I suspect will be perfectly fine.

flavor floozy

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  • 3 weeks later...

And so how did this turnout for you, McA?

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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the a la mode method is "cold candying" - make a syrup 2 parts sugar one part water, boil, let cool to 30c put along with your fruit into vacuum bag, vacuum, open 3-4 weeks later.. voila!!

it preserves the freshness perfectly....

cheers

t.

Edited by schneich (log)
  • Like 1

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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the a la mode method is "cold candying" - make a syrup 2 parts sugar one part water, boil, let cool to 30c put along with your fruit into vacuum bag, vacuum, open 3-4 weeks later.. voila!!

it preserves the freshness perfectly....

Schneich,

That's a very intriguing method! Do you have to par-boil citrus rinds first, or can you skip this step with the vacuum treatment?

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  • 3 years later...

I'm bumping this topic back up because Whole Foods had organic oranges on sale today for .79/lb, so I now have 10 lbs that I want to slice and candy. I've done this yearly by slow simmering in a crock pot, but I'm always looking for alternative techniques. I'd like to try Wybauw's 2-week increasing sugar concentration soaking technique, and even have a refractometer, but I can't find the details on how to do it. Does anyone have these details?

Also , I keep thinking there must be a way to do this with vacuum packing and sous vide. Has anyone had success with this technique?

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I'm bumping this topic back up because Whole Foods had organic oranges on sale today for .79/lb, so I now have 10 lbs that I want to slice and candy. I've done this yearly by slow simmering in a crock pot, but I'm always looking for alternative techniques. I'd like to try Wybauw's 2-week increasing sugar concentration soaking technique, and even have a refractometer, but I can't find the details on how to do it. Does anyone have these details?

Also , I keep thinking there must be a way to do this with vacuum packing and sous vide. Has anyone had success with this technique?

I don't have Wybauw's books with me (I'm up north working until Wednesday). I'm interested in what Schneich posted upstream but wondering how the brix would get increased if it's not open to evaporation. I suspect it's a combination of boiling the syrup to a particular brix, then sealing with the fruit, rinse, repeat.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I was able to find the pages describing this technique on Google Books. Also had a miserable failure. The mixture started bubbling and fermenting after a few days, despite following the directions. Obviously the sugar concentration in the early steps was insufficient to inhibit growth of bacteria/yeast.

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I've had great success with Grewling's method for candying citrus. Triple blanch, then simmer for a couple hours in a 65 deg brix syurp (iirc 45% sugar, 20 glocuse syrup, 35% water). Cool and store in syrup. I've also dried them out on the table for a bit, and they kept well in the cupboard after drying.

I don't have Wybauw's books with me (I'm up north working until Wednesday). I'm interested in what Schneich posted upstream but wondering how the brix would get increased if it's not open to evaporation. I suspect it's a combination of boiling the syrup to a particular brix, then sealing with the fruit, rinse, repeat.

You can also add sugar.

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  • 8 years later...
On 12/17/2008 at 5:37 PM, schneich said:

the a la mode method is "cold candying" - make a syrup 2 parts sugar one part water, boil, let cool to 30c put along with your fruit into vacuum bag, vacuum, open 3-4 weeks later.. voila!!

it preserves the freshness perfectly....

cheers

t.

 Has anyone tried this? Would this work for chocolate-covered citrus peel? How long would it keep for?

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