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PhilD

Emerging stars ...?

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We are planning our pre-Christmas excursion to Paris. Our current plans are:

Thursday dinner - Le Regalade

Friday lunch - Le Cinq (I trust Julot)

Saturday dinner - looking for an interesting/challenging contrast...?

As you can see: one old favorite; one emerging classic; and a space for something innovative, new and exciting (i.e. Spring is so 2006).

We look forward to your recommendations.

PS - we love El Bulli but hate Ze Kitchen Gallerie - is that a conundrum...?


Edited by PhilD (log)

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We are planning our pre-Christmas excursion to Paris. Our current plans are:

Thursday dinner - Le Regalade

Friday lunch - Le Cinq (I trust Julot)

Saturday dinner - looking for an interesting/challenging contrast...?

As you can see: one old favorite; one emerging classic; and a space for something innovative, new and exciting (i.e. Spring is so 2006).

We look forward to your recommendations.

PS - we love El Bulli but hate Ze Kitchen Gallerie - is that a conundrum...?

You may consider 4 choices that fit the bill

-les magnolias.IN closeby subburb of Perreux sur marne

-Drouaut in central Paris

-Senderesen

-L'atelier de robuchon

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Yeah , and La Regalade is almost the suburbs! ;)


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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As you can see: one old favorite; one emerging classic; and a space for something innovative, new and exciting (i.e. Spring is so 2006).

I have nothing. I think most major news from this year are only OK, not nearly as exciting as your first two choices, not even as exciting as Spring. Itinéraires, maybe. Or Caïus.

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This isn't exactly a new a place, but Gazetta is a place that doesn't get mentioned often for some reason. I had an amazing meal there in July and thought at the time that it wouldn't be surprising if it was awarded a star.

I saved the menu, which was 37€ for 4 plats and 49€ for 6.

The cuisine was definitely innovative and exciting, but more importantly delicious.

My memory of the meal is now a bit faded, but I remember that the descriptions on the menu did not necessarily do justice to what was presented.

Here is the menu on the evening we went. There is also a small à la carte selection.

Girolles, patty pan squash, saffron and watercress

White summer truffles with poached egg yolk and new potatoes

Grilled Sardines with red beans, lardo, pepper

Farm raised suckling pig with creme de boudin, Chioggia beats, purslane and spelt

Caramelised mozzarella flan with apricot sorbet and smoked bread

Floating Island with watermelon, sheep milk yoghurt, chocolate pain perdu, figs and fennel.

Actually writing about it makes me want to go back.

Another not so new choice would be Chateaubriand.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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And there's always Racines. That's not 2006. Are they open saturdays?

They're closed on weekends but open on Mondays, which for some reason feels very 2009 to me.

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Since there doesn't seem to be much in the way of new and exciting judging from what others have said - I would recommend (based on my very limited experience from our last trip) that you do Le Cinq at dinner on Saturday night. It's a very beautiful room which I think shows best at night (and that would be especially true IMO during the holiday season). And perhaps the 100 euro lunch special at Guy Savoy on Friday (which was the best meal of our trip). The place isn't new but it is still great - and the decor is very appropriate for a high end lunch (it is elegant - but somewhat spare - I liked it - but Le Cinq would definitely be a more sumptuous place for a dinner).

If you do go to Le Cinq for dinner - make a reservation at the bar for a drink before dinner (reservations are necessary because the bar post-renovations is too small for the hotel). Not only are the drinks excellent - but it is a cozy room with a big fireplace. I was grateful to have the fireplace even in October (but - then again - I am from Florida - and 50 degrees is cold for me).

Don't know what your budget is. But - if you have one - best way to keep costs reasonable IMO is to trim them on the alcohol side of the meal.

FWIW - if you do find anything "new - exciting - hot" - and especially somewhat inexpensive - Saturday night is usually the worst night of the week to dine at such an establishment (whether it's in Paris or elsewhere). Robyn

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FWIW - if you do find anything "new - exciting - hot" - and especially somewhat inexpensive - Saturday night is usually the worst night of the week to dine at such an establishment (whether it's in Paris or elsewhere).  Robyn

Amen, sister.

eGullet member #80.

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This isn't exactly a new a place, but Gazetta is a place that doesn't get mentioned often for some reason.  I had an amazing meal there in July and thought at the time that it wouldn't be surprising if it was awarded a star.

Hi. We're visiting Paris in February and Felice's write up of La Gazzetta definitely makes it sound worth visiting. However, after doing a search, I found several less than flattering reports (some using words like "inedible" about certain dishes). Obviously, I take everything I read with a grain of salt, but I would love to hear any other recent comments from other gulleteers. By way of reference, we love places like La Regalade, Chex l'ami Jean, and can not stand fancy pretentious places (AKA Ducasse). We also loved Mirazur in Menton.

I've also recently read a few interesting reports on Le Baratin with chef Raquel Carena. Does anyone have any experience there?

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This isn't exactly a new a place, but Gazetta is a place that doesn't get mentioned often for some reason.   I had an amazing meal there in July and thought at the time that it wouldn't be surprising if it was awarded a star.

Hi. We're visiting Paris in February and Felice's write up of La Gazzetta definitely makes it sound worth visiting. However, after doing a search, I found several less than flattering reports (some using words like "inedible" about certain dishes). Obviously, I take everything I read with a grain of salt, but I would love to hear any other recent comments from other gulleteers. By way of reference, we love places like La Regalade, Chex l'ami Jean, and can not stand fancy pretentious places (AKA Ducasse). We also loved Mirazur in Menton.

I've also recently read a few interesting reports on Le Baratin with chef Raquel Carena. Does anyone have any experience there?

I'm afraid this is one time when I disagree with my esteemed cohost. I and another eG member ate at Gazzetta and were not impressed at all. Le Baratin is quite good, but if you want a rising star I still don't understand why you're not considering Jadis,Table d'Eugene + Jeu de Quilles? They have all been very favorably if not superlatively reviewed, granted by French critics, but hey, they know something too. Just read Sebastien Demorand's review today in Le Fooding and tell me why that's not the table of the month. It is by me. Young guy, old recipes, fantastic presentation, good wines, reasonable prices.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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This isn't exactly a new a place, but Gazetta is a place that doesn't get mentioned often for some reason.   I had an amazing meal there in July and thought at the time that it wouldn't be surprising if it was awarded a star.

Hi. We're visiting Paris in February and Felice's write up of La Gazzetta definitely makes it sound worth visiting. However, after doing a search, I found several less than flattering reports (some using words like "inedible" about certain dishes). Obviously, I take everything I read with a grain of salt, but I would love to hear any other recent comments from other gulleteers. By way of reference, we love places like La Regalade, Chex l'ami Jean, and can not stand fancy pretentious places (AKA Ducasse). We also loved Mirazur in Menton.

I've also recently read a few interesting reports on Le Baratin with chef Raquel Carena. Does anyone have any experience there?

I'm afraid this is one time when I disagree with my esteemed cohost. I and another eG member ate at Gazzetta and were not impressed at all. Le Baratin is quite good, but if you want a rising star I still don't understand why you're not considering Jadis,Table d'Eugene + Jeu de Quilles? They have all been very favorably if not superlatively reviewed, granted by French critics, but hey, they know something too. Just read Sebastien Demorand's review today in Le Fooding and tell me why that's not the table of the month. It is by me. Young guy, old recipes, fantastic presentation, good wines, reasonable prices.

Sounds pretty good to me, even with my fractured French.

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La Regalade was disappointing in Sept. It was fine in April..so..I think it is not always the same.

On the otherhand Spring was excellent both for lunch and dinner. I also have a reservation there for Dec. 5th..looking forward to it, too!

Enjoy,

Joan

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They have all been very favorably if not superlatively reviewed, granted by French critics, but hey, they know something too. 

Granted , they (French critics) know something, but after reading Demorand's typically hip (read semi-incomprehensible to a non-native) rave over Chamarré Montmartre followed by Rubin's broken-hearted slam of the same spot within hours of each other, one wonders what :wacko:

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They have all been very favorably if not superlatively reviewed, granted by French critics, but hey, they know something too. 

Granted , they (French critics) know something, but after reading Demorand's typically hip (read semi-incomprehensible to a non-native) rave over Chamarré Montmartre followed by Rubin's broken-hearted slam of the same spot within hours of each other, one wonders what :wacko:

Demorand was very enthusiastic about Le Chamarré, perhaps a tad too much so IMO, and Rubin much too harsh in my opinion. I tend to lean in Sébastien's direction, and Emmanuel's conclusion "tristes Caraïbes" when it's all about the Indian ocean left me a bit puzzled. Products are good if not magnificent, preparations a bit too complicated and redundant but it wouldn't take much for this chef to serve really amazing food. A bit of streamlining would do it. No reason to jump to the ceiling but no reason to blow your brains out either.

A shared experience cinematographed by François-Régis Gaudry from L'Express led us halfway between the two extremes; I suppose his review of the restaurant in the magazine will reflect this more temperate appreciation.

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I'm afraid this is one time when I disagree with my esteemed cohost.  I and another eG member ate at Gazzetta and were not impressed at all. 

Did you go for lunch or dinner? One of the problems is that Gazetta, like Chateaubriand, is one of these places that has an entirely different menu for lunch and dinner and so you can't compare the two. For lunch they cater to local office workers and have pizza, salad, and a tapas plate all for around 10-16€ and then dinner is entirely another thing with a menu gastronomique. I had wanted to go when it first opened but then heard mixed reviews as well and so never did. After hearing a very good review more recently I decided to give it a try and was very impressed. I can only go by my meal, but would certainly go back.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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I'm afraid this is one time when I disagree with my esteemed cohost.  I and another eG member ate at Gazzetta and were not impressed at all. 

Did you go for lunch or dinner? One of the problems is that Gazetta, like Chateaubriand, is one of these places that has an entirely different menu for lunch and dinner and so you can't compare the two. For lunch they cater to local office workers and have pizza, salad, and a tapas plate all for around 10-16€ and then dinner is entirely another thing with a menu gastronomique. I had wanted to go when it first opened but then heard mixed reviews as well and so never did. After hearing a very good review more recently I decided to give it a try and was very impressed. I can only go by my meal, but would certainly go back.

We went for lunch the week it opened at it definately was not "pizza, salad, and a tapas" but a fuller menu.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I will add a new one. Bigarrade 106 Rue Nollet. Christophe Pele offers his own modern style at a price incredible compared to Le Cinq. It will be interesting for you to speculate on how much of the price differential between the two is in the food versus everything else.

And if you want a traditional solid wonderful meal experience I would suggest Le 153 Grenelle. Jean Jacques Jouteux really provides an incredible price quality value here that is really fun with his sister out front.

Boston


Edited by boston (log)

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They have all been very favorably if not superlatively reviewed, granted by French critics, but hey, they know something too. 

Granted , they (French critics) know something, but after reading Demorand's typically hip (read semi-incomprehensible to a non-native) rave over Chamarré Montmartre followed by Rubin's broken-hearted slam of the same spot within hours of each other, one wonders what :wacko:

Demorand was very enthusiastic about Le Chamarré, perhaps a tad too much so IMO, and Rubin much too harsh in my opinion. I tend to lean in Sébastien's direction, and Emmanuel's conclusion "tristes Caraïbes" when it's all about the Indian ocean left me a bit puzzled. Products are good if not magnificent, preparations a bit too complicated and redundant but it wouldn't take much for this chef to serve really amazing food. A bit of streamlining would do it. No reason to jump to the ceiling but no reason to blow your brains out either.

A shared experience cinematographed by François-Régis Gaudry from L'Express led us halfway between the two extremes; I suppose his review of the restaurant in the magazine will reflect this more temperate appreciation.

Thanks, Ptipois, I enjoyed your video. I too was puzzled by Rubin's "Caraibe" reference and just assumed his geography needed a little brushing up.

I would so much prefer that critics give a straightforward pronouncement dealing with the quality of the product, level and consistency of the cooking and service as you and Dr. Talbott seem to do. A mention of the comfort and decor is worth a few lines, but spare me the flowery prose occupying 3/4 of the content, or the color themes (let's eat red today) found in the food press upon occasion.

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something innovative, new and exciting

? Jadis, Table d'Eugene, Jeu de Quilles ?

John thanks for these. We have booked into Jadis. We used to enjoy Guillaume Delage's food when he cooked a Gaya so it will be really interesting to try it in his own restaurant. I will report back.

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Yes, and the concierges are really great ! ;)

Since there doesn't seem to be much in the way of new and exciting judging from what others have said - I would recommend (based on my very limited experience from our last trip) that you do Le Cinq at dinner on Saturday night.  It's a very beautiful room which I think shows best at night (and that would be especially true IMO during the holiday season).  And perhaps the 100 euro lunch special at Guy Savoy on Friday (which was the best meal of our trip).  The place isn't new but it is still great - and the decor is very appropriate for a high end lunch (it is elegant - but somewhat spare - I liked it - but Le Cinq would definitely be a more sumptuous place for a dinner).

If you do go to Le Cinq for dinner - make a reservation at the bar for a drink before dinner (reservations are necessary because the bar post-renovations is too small for the hotel).  Not only are the drinks excellent - but it is a cozy room with a big fireplace.  I was grateful to have the fireplace even in October (but - then again - I am from Florida - and 50 degrees is cold for me).

Don't know what your budget is.  But - if you have one - best way to keep costs reasonable IMO is to trim them on the alcohol side of the meal.

FWIW - if you do find anything "new - exciting - hot" - and especially somewhat inexpensive - Saturday night is usually the worst night of the week to dine at such an establishment (whether it's in Paris or elsewhere).  Robyn


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

blog

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Yes, and the concierges are really great !  ;)

Couldn't agree more :smile: . Robyn

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During a recent trip I was most pleasantly surprised by Café des Musées. It's between the Place des Vosges and the Picasso Museum. It's more of a lunch place than dinner in my opinion, but it serves some great traditional food with modern accents. I had a blood sausage terrine made with green chartreuse that was one of the best dishes I've had this year, and 3-course lunch for two with wine was 60 euro.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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This isn't exactly a new a place, but Gazetta is a place that doesn't get mentioned often for some reason.   I had an amazing meal there in July and thought at the time that it wouldn't be surprising if it was awarded a star.

Hi. We're visiting Paris in February and Felice's write up of La Gazzetta definitely makes it sound worth visiting. However, after doing a search, I found several less than flattering reports (some using words like "inedible" about certain dishes). Obviously, I take everything I read with a grain of salt, but I would love to hear any other recent comments from other gulleteers.

Hugh, in case your trip is not yet complete, Francois Simon raves about La Gazetta in today's Figaro and calls it "sans-faute". You can read the full review (at least for now) here


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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