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Cochon Butcher


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I'm wondering if anyone has the inside scoop on when exactly Cochon Butcher will be opening up? I've read January, but me being me and pigs being pigs, I'm hoping to find out the precise date ASAP so airline tickets can be appropriately purchased.

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I've heard January too, but I haven't heard a firm date, and I doubt we will until much closer to the opening.

I interviewed Donald last week, and he's firm on January. Haven't heard a precise day yet. My sense was that it depends somewhat on when the city signs off on everything.

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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Is this interview going to be available in the near future?

No, not until February. It's for an in-flight magazine. It's more about Donald Link (and others) than the Butcher.

I can't remember if Donald said much more about the Butcher, but I'll be happy to post the interview when I have time (probably not until the weekend).

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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  • 2 months later...

Officially it's still a soft opening (according to the PR rep). The New York Times ran a big piece on the place today:

It’s all preparation for his newest venture, Cochon Butcher, which opened Tuesday. The 1,000-square-foot combination meat market and 25-seat cafe is inside the same century-old brick warehouse that houses Cochon, the down-home Cajun restaurant that gained Mr. Link national attention.

Mr. Link, 39, wants Cochon Butcher to be “like all the little specialized markets in Cajun country, where everybody goes to get their Cajun meats and sausages — things you can’t get at the regular grocery store.” Though a sprinkling of mostly mass-produced Cajun meats has long been available in New Orleans supermarkets, this is the first time the city has seen all the iconic Louisiana-style charcuterie items house-made by a notable chef and under one roof: the thick smoked sausage known as andouille, the garlicky fresh links called chaurice and the smoked seasoned ham known as tasso.

Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"

Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

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Don't you people know you're not supposed to visit a new restaurant for at least six months? Sheesh.

p.s. the Cuban is awesome, but the pork belly was too rich for me, which is hard to credit, but true. I think it's the realization that my cholesterol is high that made it impossible to properly enjoy.

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Oddly enough, I found the pork belly to be well within my richness limits. Delicious.

Also, the pickles were fantastic, and overall, I'm very excited about this place.

I ate half of the pork belly sandwich, and shared the other half, sliced up, with some folks in my office. It was well within their richness limits too.

And I'm with you on the pickles. I need to try the pastrami with sauerkraut as well, but man that Cuban was spectacular. It's going to be hard not to order that the next time I go.

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I tried the Cuban also, and got a bite of the Muffaletta. All very good, and fairly priced, considering the location and quality. My only problem so far is that a glass of wine doubles the price, and makes what was a good-value lunch into one that isn't.

Those pickles though-- man. Does anyone know if the pickles they serve are the same as the bread and butters they sell packaged? I meant to ask, but forgot.

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I got the pastrami and a muffaletta to go, which I had the next day. The pastrami was delicious with a pronounced smokiness but not acrid. The sauerkraut was mild and slighlty sweet. Excellent sandwich but could have used a little more meat. The muffaletta was so so the next day. I believe they serve them hot, so I don't think day old and cold would be exemplary. Great chocolate chip cookie as well. Lots to investigate there. Oh, and I really liked the homemade chips. ch

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Went today, tried the pork belly (delicious, could have used a little more mint) and the cuban (very good, though a tad too mayo/cheesy). The pickles are killer, and the housemade chips were tasty. The Mountain Springs (Arkansas) fizzy water is a nice touch, too.

I was most excited to see the air-cured sausages: coppa, lomo, (spanish style dried) chorizo, soppressata, etc. All are hard to find in s LA, so I welcome these options. Also noticed good-looking merguez--wish the place would put it into a sandwich!

One drawback: uncomfortable square stools that weigh a ton. Too heavy to scoot around, with weird angled tops....and the stools are slightly too low for a short person (like moi) to sit comfortably at the the tall tables.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just posted a review on "Sundays in NOLA forum". (The moderator may move it to this forum ) This is a must go place!

What disease did cured ham actually have?

Megan sandwich: White bread, Miracle Whip and Italian submarine dressing. {Megan is 4 y.o.}

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Wow, my next trip to New Orleans I'm bringing a giant cooler and am going to buy one of everything!

If I had to spend a month in New Orleans for work or something I would just go to Butcher every day and get something new to try. That would be a very affordable yet delicious way to eat.

Really, is there any other shop in the country that is doing anything at this scale? I know there is Salumi in Seattle, and while their sausages are good they have less than a dozen products.

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Does anyone happen to know Kris from Cochon Butcher? I believe he is the main meat man working his magic with the pigs; crafting the sausages, saulmi, etc... I would like to contact him about a possible apprenticeship.

Does anyone more familiar with the place and the people who run it think this is something they might be open to?

Thanks for your help

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