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Gently pre-used ginger syrup


Darienne
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With the help of the 'Ginger Lady', Andiesenji :wub: , I have now made my second wonderful batch of candied ginger. The first batch, coated in chocolate, is all gone and we are moving on. I planted the leftover knobby bits and am hoping to harvest a crop of ginger in about nine months.

The first leftover syrup was cooked into little hard ginger candies. They taste gingery, but not overwhelmingly so.

And Andie generously gave me other uses for the ginger syrup: candying other fruit or citrus peels or even chestnuts, topping gingerbread or cookies, glazing chicken or other meats, sauces for rice, etc.

My question is can this syrup, a boiled down simple syrup; 1 cup water to 1 ½ cups sugar, be used as the base for any other confection? A brittle with nuts? Candy-coated nuts? Crystalline or non-crystalline confections? Add more sugar? Or corn syrup and then?

All ideas are invited. Thanks.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Use it to make marshmallows! You can put them on top of pumpkin pie and broil it VERY briefly. (But watch out, because homemade marshmallows brown quickly - like in seconds.) Or if you are from the midwest (where I was raised) you could use them to top off candied sweet potatoes.

You can make marshmallow fluff with it, too. Would be great as a garnish for apple pie.

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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I have never made a granitas. Could be a start.

Or marshmallows. I like making marshmallows and ginger marshmallows, dipped in dark chocolate sounds good. I had not thought that the syrup would make marshmallows, but after looking at a recipe, I can see that it would.

Thanks. :smile:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I am sure you can use the syrup in any candy recipe that calls for syrup or honey.

Consider honeycomb candy

how about the "comfits" popular in "olden" times or the candies made with boiled honey in which nuts, usually almonds, are dipped multiple times, drying them in between "layers" until they are encased in a clear candy shell.

Comfits recipe

Honeycomb candy recipes

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Cocktails!! There are any number of places where a little shot of ginger and sweetness would be delicious, In fact almost any drink recipe that calls for Canton Ginger liqueur could likely substitute ginger syrup.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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You could just add to seltzer for a ginger soda or stir into a nice cup of tea

tracey

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I am sure you can use the syrup in any candy recipe that calls for syrup or honey.

how about the "comfits" popular in "olden" times 

Thanks everybody for all the ideas. And thanks for that fascinating website: Historic Food, although I don't think I'll be making a Palpatroon of Lobsters soon. :biggrin:

Thanks again.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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You could just add to seltzer for a ginger soda or stir into a nice cup of tea

tracey

Oooh! That brings to mind a recipe out of Martha Stewart's magazine years ago: Ginger syrup and seltzer poured over a scoop each of vanilla ice cream and orange sherbet. It's a drinkable orange dreamsicle.

April

One cantaloupe is ripe and lush/Another's green, another's mush/I'd buy a lot more cantaloupe/ If I possessed a fluoroscope. Ogden Nash

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Just a note to say that I made the butter scotch that Andie linked above. I ate some straight. I chopped some up for chocolate chip cookies. And right now I've got a cheesecake with a whole slew of the pieces in it. Very good stuff!

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Cocktails!!  There are any number of places where a little shot of ginger and sweetness would be delicious,  In fact almost any drink recipe that calls for Canton Ginger liqueur could likely substitute ginger syrup.

Heck yeah!!

Apple Jack (Lair's bonded, if you can get it)

lemon juice

ginger syrup

or

gin

lime juice

ginger syrup

2 or 3 drops of Angostura bitters.

Both are shaken in ice and strained into a chilled cocktail glass.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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Just a note to say that I made the butter scotch that Andie linked above. I ate some straight.  I chopped some up for chocolate chip cookies.  And right now I've got a cheesecake with a whole slew of the pieces in it.  Very good stuff!

Is there a reason why I could not throw a couple of handfuls of pecans into the mix at the last minute?

Thanks.

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 8 months later...

My question is about storage of ginger syrup.

Just finished another batch of ginger and have leftover syrup as usual.

- Roughly how long could I store it just in a dark place, like a cupboard or plastic container (I have a large Rubbermaid container in which I keep all the assorted ingredients like citric acid, cocoa butter, confectioner's sugar, food colorings, etc.)

- Roughly how long could I store it in a fridge?

- Roughly how long could I store it in the freezer?

Thanks. :wink:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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My question is about storage of ginger syrup.

Just finished another batch of ginger and have leftover syrup as usual.

- Roughly how long could I store it just in a dark place, like a cupboard or plastic container (I have a large Rubbermaid container in which I keep all the assorted ingredients like citric acid, cocoa butter, confectioner's sugar, food colorings, etc.)

- Roughly how long could I store it in a fridge?

- Roughly how long could I store it in the freezer?

Thanks.   :wink:

I've got a jar that has been on the pantry shelf for a year. I poured the hot syrup into a scalded quart canning jar, topped with a sterilized lid and tightened the ring and the "dimple" appeared when it was cool and is still there. I have some apricot syrup from that candying process that is probably more than two yeas old and is still good - I opened one of the pint jars last week to make a glaze for a pie and it was fine.

Once opened, I have kept the stuff in the fridge for many months - have never had anything grow in or on it.

I usually transfer it to a squeeze bottle to make it easier to dispense.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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My question is about storage of ginger syrup.

Just finished another batch of ginger and have leftover syrup as usual.

- Roughly how long could I store it just in a dark place, like a cupboard or plastic container (I have a large Rubbermaid container in which I keep all the assorted ingredients like citric acid, cocoa butter, confectioner's sugar, food colorings, etc.)

- Roughly how long could I store it in a fridge?

- Roughly how long could I store it in the freezer?

Thanks.   :wink:

I've got a jar that has been on the pantry shelf for a year. I poured the hot syrup into a scalded quart canning jar, topped with a sterilized lid and tightened the ring and the "dimple" appeared when it was cool and is still there. I have some apricot syrup from that candying process that is probably more than two yeas old and is still good - I opened one of the pint jars last week to make a glaze for a pie and it was fine.

Once opened, I have kept the stuff in the fridge for many months - have never had anything grow in or on it.

I usually transfer it to a squeeze bottle to make it easier to dispense.

Thank you. It's too late I guess for the scalding process...I had already poured it into a plastic container. Or could I heat it again and then do the scalding glass, etc, etc.?

If it is simply too late to redeem it, I'll simply keep it in the fridge as it is. Or divide it into two smaller containers and freeze some. It's always a question in the end of space...

Just keep on learning...keeps the brain in a functioning whirl. :rolleyes:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I'm pretty sure that it will keep indefinitely in the fridge... or until it starts to crystallise, in which case reboiling it would fix it.

Thanks. I suspect that you are correct.

Now my next question is:

I must make another batch of ginger this week. What proportion of the syrup to make the new batch could safely come from this past batch?

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Cocktails!!  There are any number of places where a little shot of ginger and sweetness would be delicious,  In fact almost any drink recipe that calls for Canton Ginger liqueur could likely substitute ginger syrup.

Now you're talking! There's a drink I'm in love with at The Standard Grill called "Penny Drop".

Vodka, 'housemade ginger cordial' (your ginger syrup), lime juice, ginger beer. Not sure of the

proportions, but you could certainly play with it. The Standard bartender pours it over lots of crushed ice in a copper mug, and garnishes with crystallized ginger. Adult ginger ale.

Refreshingly delicious!

www.onetoughcookienyc.com

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I'm pretty sure that it will keep indefinitely in the fridge... or until it starts to crystallise, in which case reboiling it would fix it.

Thanks. I suspect that you are correct.

Now my next question is:

I must make another batch of ginger this week. What proportion of the syrup to make the new batch could safely come from this past batch?

No more than half and taste it carefully to be sure it doesn't have even a hint of "scorch" flavor.

Even if you have stored the syrup in a plastic container, you can always reheat it - simmer for a few minutes to be sure it is evenly hot - then jar it up as you would jelly.

When I was delving into my pantry a couple of days ago I found a jar of citrus syrup from 2004, vacuum still intact. I opened it and used it to glaze chicken pieces, also put some over ice and added seltzer to make a cooler. I'm still alive so it must be okay.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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No more than half and taste it carefully to be sure it doesn't have even a hint of "scorch" flavor. 

Even if you have stored the syrup in a plastic container, you can always reheat it - simmer for a few minutes to be sure it is evenly hot - then jar it up as you would jelly. 

When I was delving into my pantry a couple of days ago I found a jar of citrus syrup from 2004, vacuum still intact.  I opened it and used it to glaze chicken pieces,  also put some over ice and added seltzer to make a cooler.  I'm still alive so it must be okay.

Thank you, O Ginger Lady. :wub: I really needed that information. I used some premade ginger syrup with my Clementine oranges and I guess I used too much. Not a good idea.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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