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Potato Sandwiches


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I associate tangy tonkatsu with grilled pork. Is that normal?

Tonkatsu sauce is usually associated with breaded and deep-fried pork cutlets (tonkatsu), although some people like me add it to Japanese-style potato salad, among other uses.

Japanese-style potato salad is very heavy on the Japanese mayonnaise, usually with bits of carrot and cucumber.

Something like this:

http://www.justhungry.com/2006/05/japanese_potato.html

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Are chip butties associated with football (Gaelic or soccer) in Ireland? I'm thinking it might be like baseball's ballpark frank in the US, or strawberries at Wimbledon, etc.

I don't think there's a connection there. Chips are certainly sold at such events, but generally in a bag or a punnet - it's pretty rare to see a butty for sale.

No, I associate the butty with takeaway (fish and) chips consumed at home. It's probably (although I've never thought about it) a way of stretching the meal and making it go further, and a carry-over from when times were tight.

Incidentally, I was discussing this with my wife last night and she asked me to point out that mayonnaise is an integral part of the chip butty in her mind. I hate the stuff and never have it on anything, so that had passed me by.

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Or crazy Canucks with potato chip sarnies?

Are potato chip sandwiches Canadian?

I've lived in Canada my entire life and never even heard of someone putting potato chips on a sandwich. Is it an eastern Canadian thing?

Ah but then you must not have associated with the right crazy Canucks! :biggrin:

I have lived in B.C., Alberta, Ontario and Quebec and I can't tell you where I first learned this habit but I have known quite a number of friends over the years who put chips on sandwiches. It might even date back to my days in the Forces when ketchup on toast was a favourite breakfast.

I grew up on the east coast (Moncton , New Brunswick) and remember my grandfather used to do it. I am known to eat them on occasion and it must be toast with butter and jam with plain salty potato chips, and always accompanied by a tall, cold glass of milk. It is my go to when I am craving sweet and salty, usually around that time of the month...you girls know what I'm talking about.

A truly destitute man is not one without riches, but the poor wretch who has never partaken of lobster. - anonymous
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned Primanti Brothers.

I'm not from Pittsburgh, so I didn't grow up with this concept, but I heard about it plenty of times. There was a knock-off of this restaurant in the Flats of Cleveland when I lived there called Panini's, and they sold their sandwiches with choice of meat, plus cole slaw and fries inside the sandwich, usually doing their best business late at night. I worked in a bar in that area, so getting off work late at night meant searching for something to eat at that hour. Most nights it was a choice between Panini's, Chin's Chinese or The Big Egg.

Personally, I'm not a big fan, but it certainly makes for a very filling sandwich.

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I am half Canadian (did not know this food was part of my heritage!) as a kid our standard "healthy" after school snack combo .....we would stop at the Italian bakery on the way home and pick up a couple of crusty rolls each (one to eat while walking the other for the sandwich) go home slather on lots of yellow mustard, dill pickles and a big pile of chips ..then I would take my history book and squished it flat for easy handling and then had it with a ice cold Coke...I may have ot try one again it has been years!!! I dont have my history book or the same crusty rolls (or even the same metabolism!) ...sigh ..memories

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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I had an idea... why not make a Potato Latkas and put that into a sandwich... a lil sour cream... chives... smoked salmon or smoked trout... or smoked whitefish... cream cheese?? bagel?? :)

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I had an idea... why not make a Potato Latkas and put that into a sandwich... a lil sour cream... chives... smoked salmon or smoked trout... or smoked whitefish... cream cheese?? bagel?? :)

on a good rye

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Here's the Lebanese version for you, my buddies and I lived on those things in high school and college because they were cheap, delicious and went great with beer and Pepsi. You can find them in almost any Lebanese sandwich shop in Beirut or elsewhere.

Pit bread + hot of from the fryer fries + Ketchup + cabbage coleslaw (NOT the sweet American version) + pickles + tomatoes.

I still make those with leftover French fries.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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There is also the variation of a chip butty made with the very thin packaged potato "crisps" (English) or "chips" (Australiah) or ??? (American)

Eat them straight away or the crisps go un-crisp and the whole point is the texture difference between them and the soft bread.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

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I think I have drooled through this whole thread! I have never heard of any of these kinds of sandwiches and when I really stopped and thought about it, it does sound good! When I was a kid my grandfather would take us out for hamburgers, and we would put fries on the burger and pour our chocolate shake over the burger...it was so good!

edit to add: Now, one thing I have not had since I moved to the southern part of the US is a good egg salad sandwich. They just don't seem to be that common here...

Edited by CKatCook (log)

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Does Mumbai's vada paav count? This is mashed potato spiced in exciting ways, made into balls that are diiped in chickpea flour batter and deep fried. Then one fritter is gently smashed between a paav, and enrobed with chutney(s) of choice +/- green chiles.

Pao looks lie hamburger bun but predates the British, to the Portuguese who had occupied the town named after its regnant deity, Mumba Devi, much as Los Angeles is, Mumbai. They built the Bom Jesus church. Catherine of Aragon married a Charles or someone tweedy, and brought the town with her as her dowry. It slowly morphed into Bombay, the harbor with the Bom Jesus Church, not necessarily to the joy and delight of the native population. A touch of the Inquisition etc. had preceded all this. Read Sanjay Subrahmanyam: The Portuguese In Asia.

All of the above is a context to the remark often heard today in quarters international and domestic, mocking the "change" of Bombay to Mumbai. It is inconvenient they say, it does not trip merrily off the tongue. Goodness gracious!

Pav or pao has a very specific texture and staling quality: it does not keep at all and owes its unique profile to old Iberian breadmaking methods, which would make an interesting research topic. Just like the fact that Srinagar in Kashmir has some of the finest bagel-like breads in the universe. So something so emblematic of East European Jews turns up there deeply embedded in its Muslim culture. Very interesting!

Recently, McD's found itself enmeshed in labyrinthine politics and cultural gyres. It had entered in some deal with a political group to find and standardize the vada-pav, everyman/person's staff of life, for a mutual sweetheart deal, the influential poltical group to then strongarm independent street and small vendors for violating "standards"!!

http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/video...o.aspx?id=38318

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From my childhood: I recall my mom frying potato slices in bacon fat, then placing them between slices of Mrs. Baird's white sandwich bread slathered with Hellmann's mayonnaise and seasoned with salt and pepper. And if she had a few slices of dry salt pork bacon on the side (with the cracklin's attached), she was a very happy woman.

She's been thin and healthy all her life and she still is. But at nearly 73, those sandwiches and dry salt pork are a thing of the past. Or so she would have me believe. :huh:

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I love potato salad sandwiches. They rank right up there with bakedbean sandwiches.

Leftover potato salad (mama's recipe).... white baloon bread.....carb lovers bliss.

Mine aren't as goopy as the one in Hiroyuki's hyperlink in the second page.

Edited by Susie Q (log)
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